85% of children in private school in one area of West London

dad and kids Sending children to private schools has long been a popular choice for parents in West London. But in one small area of Westminster the figures are still surprising. 85% of the children aged 4-11 in Knightsbridge and Belgravia ward are absent from the state school roll and presumed to be in independent schools.

The figures were produced by the GLA in its research on demand for school places.

Knightsbridge and Belgravia ward is a neighbourhood of ultra-expensive residential property to the south of Hyde Park. In contrast there are 114 wards in London, around 18%, that have no children of primary age attending an independent school. Many of these areas are in the less affluent eastern boroughs of Barking and Dagenham, Newham, Havering and Bexley.

The GLA calculates that across London 12.8% of children aged between 4-15 are in independent schools, and this is most prevalent in south west and central London, particularly Westminster, and Kensington and Chelsea.

Data from the Department for Education shows the rate is 10.6% if children 16-18 are taken into account, and the rate has been steady for the past 4 years. Across London 146,000 children are being educated privately.

When mapped at borough level the east/west divide becomes clear, with the exception of the City of London where there is just 1 state primary and 4 independents.

6 boroughs, Wandsworth, Richmond, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster and Camden account for 40% of the children in private education.

Private school uptake map

 

Boroughs on the eastern edge of the capital have little private education. In Barking and Dagenham it is less than 1%, just 115 of the 40,000 school-age children in the borough.

Only the South East matches London for the proportion of children in independent schools. Nationally the rate is 7%. Many parts of London are well below that rate underlining the contrast between rich and poor in the city.

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See also

105,000 extra secondary pupils pose huge challenge for capital’s schools

Fight for reception gets tougher as more kids swell primary school demand

Schools data reveals ethnic mix with fall in proportion of white British pupils

 

 

Lowest paid living in Newham as rates remain static across capital

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Photo: Shaun Wilkinson ┃Shutterstock.com

The lowest paid full time workers in London appear to be living in Newham. Hourly rates of pay for residents of the East London borough are lower than the typical rate for the UK generally at £12.90.

People living in the City of London or the best-paid borough, Westminster, are typically earning in excess of £250 per week more with an hourly rate of pay over £20.

The figures are revealed in the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings from the Office for National Statistics. They are based upon a sample of PAYE tax records and are considered the most reliable guide to pay rates.

Newham is not the only London borough where the median pay rate is below the rate for the UK generally. In Barking and Dagenham the full time hourly rate is £13.31, that’s 5p per hour below the UK median rate.

In contrast, across the river from Newham, the hourly rate in Greenwich is £3 higher.

Hourly pay full time London map

The median rate in Brent is below £14 per hour. In Enfield, Haringey, Waltham Forest, Hounslow and Ealing it is below £15.

Outside the centre, rates are highest in a pocket of South West London. Kensington and Chelsea, Richmond and Wandsworth have rates above £19 per hour. In Hammersmith and Fulham it is above £18.

The ONS uses a median rate or mid point rather than calculating an average, which would be distorted by a small number of very highly paid people. The rates are before tax and do not include overtime.

Rates of pay in London remain higher than the rest of the country. The London-wide median rate for full time employment is £16.16, £1.44 per hour more than the next nearest region, the South East of England, and £4.15 more than the lowest paid region, Northern Ireland.

Hourly rates full time regional

The median rate across the UK moved very little in the past year, rising by just 1.5% but that is 5 times higher than London where the hourly rate rose by just 5p since 2014.

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See also

Over 750,000 jobs pay less than the living wage in the capital

Paying the rent takes up 72% of income for private tenants

Buying a home gets further out of reach, now 11 times annual salary

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Photo: Tom Gowanlock ┃Shutterstock.com

The cost of a home in London has risen to 11 times the annual salary. This startling statistic is revealed in the data on earnings and house prices from the Office of National Statistics.

Each April the ONS does a survey on earnings and it has just released this date revealing that the median weekly pay in London was £660 or £34,320 annually. The median is the mid point, thus avoiding the distortion of the high and low numbers in calculating an average.

Data from the Land Registry shows that the median house price in London for the same period was £379,000 or 11 times earnings.

Someone earning the median wage who had managed to save perhaps £20,000 as a deposit and then took out a maximum 4.5 times salary mortgage would still only have raised 46% of the cost of the median property. It is hardly surprising therefore that the proportion of homes bought with a mortgage is falling. As reported by Urbs, cash buyers are becoming the dominant group in some areas of central London. They are mostly older people who have sold a more expensive property, or overseas investors.

The ratio of earnings to house prices has been on a steadily upward path since the late 90s, apart from a small dip following the financial crisis of 2008. In 1997 the median house cost 4 times the median salary. That ratio has since more than doubled across the country, and nearly trebled in London.

house to earnings timeline

In some parts of London the figures are even more eye-watering.  A median price home in Wandsworth costs 17 times the median earnings of someone living in the borough. In Westminster it is 22 times and in Kensington and Chelsea the median house price is 38 times salary.

house to earnings map

The data for the rest of the country helps explain why so many people choose to move out of London. In the South East generally the ratio is 9 times earnings. That’s lower than all but the 3 London boroughs on the eastern edge of the city, Havering, Barking and Dagenham and Bexley. In the North East of England a home is just under 5 times annual salary, a ratio not seen in London since the late 90s.

house to earnings national

These ratios mean that buying a property will remain out of reach for many in the capital. The much talked about ‘generation rent’ looks like it’s here to stay.

Source data

See also

What would you do with £1.6 million in cash? Buy a house, of course

The jobs success and housing failure causing a crisis for the capital

Why the London property market is heading back to the 1970s

 

 

More mums in their early 40s than early 20s in city’s wealthiest areas

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Photo: g-stockstudio ┃Shuttertock.com

Women giving birth in their early 40s outnumber women giving birth in their early 20s in 8 of London’s most affluent boroughs. In Kensington and Chelsea the ratio is 2:1 in favour of the older mums.

The figures in the latest births data from the Office for National Statistics underlines the long-running trend towards women having children when they are older. Nationally the number of mums in the 35-39 age group exceeded those aged 20-24 for the first time last year, according to the data just released.

But in London that trend is more developed and the numbers of women in their 40s giving birth is growing. Across England and Wales just under half of all births are to women in their 20s. In London it is 38% as more women wait before having children.

London v national birth ages

London mums have an older age profile. The data show that 18% of all the children born in the England and Wales in 2014 were born in London. But only 9% of those born to under 20s were in the capital, while it is home to a quarter of mothers over 35 and more than a third of those over 45.

Across England and Wales as a whole the picture is different and the number of mothers in their early 20s outnumbers those in their 40s by 4:1.  This is the case in some London boroughs too, such as Newham and Barking and Dagenham. But in Richmond, and Kensington and Chelsea the 40-44s have outnumbered the 20-24s for some years and this trend is now emerging in more boroughs, including Camden, City of London, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kingston, Wandsworth and Westminster.

20s v 40s

The affluent nature of these boroughs suggests that professional women trying to balance career with the timing of children may be a key driver of this trend.

Source data

See also

Baby booming Wandsworth is the city’s kiddie capital

Over 50% of London babies have mothers born outside the UK

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

 

The city’s workforce: best qualified in the UK and getting smarter

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Photo: pcruciatti ┃Shutterstock.com

London has the best-qualified workforce in the UK. Nearly half the working-age population has a degree-level or equivalent qualification.

The proportion of people educated and trained to this level (so-called level 4+) has been rising over recent years and remains consistently above the UK average.

Data based on the Annual Population Survey from the Office for National Statistics shows London reached 49% with level 4+ qualifications by the end of last year.

Qualifications 4+ chart

Levels are far higher in some areas of the capital. 9 boroughs in the centre and South West have more than 60% of the workforce with qualifications at level 4+. These include Camden, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, City of London, Richmond and Lambeth. But top spot goes to Wandsworth where almost 70% of people aged 16-64 have a degree or equivalent.

Only Havering, Barking and Dagenham, and Bexley have levels below the national average.

Qualifications 4+ map

The proportion of people with no qualifications was stable through 2013 and 2014 at 8%, a little below the national average. In Barking and Dagenham the rate is nearly double that at just below 16%. Greenwich, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Haringey all have more than 10% of the working population with no qualifications, which is above the national average.

Qualitfications none map

The skills levels of the London workforce has been praised by foreign business owners as an incentive for operating in the city, according to a survey conducted by the GLA, previously reported by Urbs.

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See also

What National Insurance really tells us about London’s overseas workforce

New workers stick together and head north of river as they settle in the capital

How London boroughs will rival the ‘Northern Powerhouse’

A prosperity divide and neither rich nor poor seem happy

© Acmanley | Dreamstime.com - London Street Art Photo

Photo: © Acmanley | Dreamstime.com

The people of Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea and Camden are among the wealthiest on average in the UK, but money is not buying them happiness, as they are more miserable than many across the country.

These findings emerge in an index that looks at the combination of wealth and life satisfaction to indicate levels of prosperity. It suggests that 6 London boroughs (Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London) are the most prosperous in the country. But 4 others (Bexley, Greenwich, Brent and Croydon) are in the bottom 10 of 170 areas assessed.

The high prosperity scores for London boroughs are based largely on wealth not well-being. The Legatum Institute, a think tank that says that it is focused on promoting prosperity, put the index together. It used GDP per capita as a measure of wealth and the life satisfaction data collected by the Office for National Statistics.

Residents in Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London, enjoy an average income of £133,000. 15 of the top 20 areas in the UK for average earnings, including Tower Hamlets, Hackney, Newham, Lambeth, Southwark, Lewisham, Haringey and Islington, are in London. But the spread of wealth is not uniform across the capital and some boroughs come at the lower end of the table. Redbridge, Waltham Forest, Enfield and Barking and Dagenham have average earnings of £14,300.

What is common to all London boroughs however is the low level of life satisfaction. The happiest place in the UK according the ONS measure is the Outer Hebrides. Out of 170 areas the only London borough to squeeze into the top 50 is Bromley at 49 in the rankings.

Wealthy Hammersmith and Fulham and Kensington and Chelsea are down in the mid 80s and only 6 other boroughs (Ealing, Merton, Sutton, Kingston, Richmond and Hounslow) make it into the top 100.

While residents of Camden and the City of London come top for earnings they are in the bottom 10 when it comes to happiness, along with Croydon and Brent. Haringey and Islington folk also seem to be miserable – 11th from bottom in the life satisfaction rankings.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Pay rates underline gap between rich and poor boroughs

Welcome to the city of the super rich

 

 

Elderly losing out in city with high levels of digital skills

finger on tablet-2A very high proportion of people in  London use the internet but what are they able to do when they are online? 91% of Londoners have at some point accessed the internet according to survey data from the Office for National Statistics, reported by Urbs.  But fewer than that have basic skills it would seem, according to a another survey into digital capability?

The research, commissioned by the charity Go On UK, which aims to improve digital skills in individuals and organisations, shows that Londoners come out on top in the UK,  but 16% would fail to perform 5 basic digital skills.

The charity identified a series of task to define digital skills, from searching for information, to filling out an online form or creating something from online assets.  Those with all 5 are defined as having Basic Digital Skills, those with the first 4 as having Basic Online Skills.

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Graphic: Ipsos for Go On UK

Research company Ipsos carried out face-to-face interviews with 4,167 people nationally, 577 of them in London, to assess skills. 71% nationally possessed all 5 skills; in London it was 84%.

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Map: Ipsos for Go On UK

 

Looking at the survey results at local authority level saw a high point of 90% in the City of London and above average scores of 88% in Kensington and Chelsea, and 86% in Wandsworth. Seven boroughs had rates below 80% with the lowest recorded in Redbridge, 76% and Newham, 73%.

Across the UK, skill levels in older people are much less common but the decline for those over 45 was much steeper in London than the rest of the country.  While skill levels for groups below 44 are almost identical, in the 65+ age category 43% have the basic digital skills but only 38% in London.

One positive difference between London and the rest of the country is the gender gap, which the survey suggests doesn’t exist in the capital.  In the UK as a whole 80% of men and 74% of women had the basic digital skills. In London it was 84% and 83%.

Access to broadband emerged as a key factor as did ownership of digital devices.  London scores well in both these areas; 93% of respondents in London had broadband access and 94% owned a smartphone.

Source data

See also

More than half a million Londoners have never used the internet

London’s smart, but not smart enough

 

Mapping Londoners: Born in Sweden

For a small country of 9.7 million people, Sweden has quite an impact. From H&M on the high street, Ikea in our homes or Spotify on our music players, Swedish brands are part of British life.

But there are few Swedish people resident in the UK. According to the 2011 census 14,747 of the resident population of London were born in Sweden. That’s about half of all the Swedes in the UK and just 0.2% of Londoners.

Most live centrally, with 10% in Westminster, 1.200 in Kensington and Chelsea and 895 in Camden. Hackney, Richmond and Wandsworth were other favourite boroughs.

Born in Sweden

According to the most recent population estimates, based on the Annual Population Survey, so less reliable than the census, the number of Swedes appears to have fallen and may be down to 10,000 in London.

So some Swedish Londoners may have headed home. Those that remain can keep in touch with the homeland using Skype – that’s a Swedish invention too.

Source data

Mapping Londoners: Born in Denmark

Mapping Londoners: Born in Norway

More population maps

 

Thirst for craft beers drives an increase in breweries

beerBrewing is booming in London perhaps driven by the current craze for craft beers.

The number of breweries in London has gone up from 45 in 2013 to 76 in 2015. Nearly 90,000 people in the city are now employed in the brewing and pubs sector out of 870,000 across the UK, according to the British Beer and Pub Association. 46% of the people working in the industry are under 24.

While big landmark breweries like Young’s historic Ram Brewery in Wandsworth have closed the expansion in the industry appears to be driven by micro breweries, many of them catering for the growing popularity of craft beers.

But while brewery numbers are increasing pub numbers are falling, according to the British Beer and Pub Association. This year to June 411 pubs closed in London and the South East while 145 new premises opened their doors, a net loss of 266.

This means that many of the new brewers will be looking wider than the pub trade to sell their beer, with some doing deals directly with retailers while other take their sales online.

Source data

See also

London losing its thirst for binge drinking

Mapping Londoners: Born in Germany

The number of BMWs, Mercedes and Audis on the street would suggest that Londoners had a thing about Germans, or their cars at least. German citizens themselves are a little less commonplace.

There are 55,000 German-born Londoners, and they are the 19th largest national group in the city, according to data from the last census. Germans live throughout the city but the majority are in inner London boroughs.

Wandsworth is the most popular borough with German-born Londoners and the largest number are found in a wedge from Wandsworth through Kensington and Chelsea and Westminster to Camden.

Born in Germany

Source data

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