How London compares for the cost of public transport

Taxi Bus Tube-2-1London is the third most expensive for public transport out of 71 cities globally, according to a survey by the financial services company UBS.

As part of its annual prices and earnings survey UBS looked at the cost of getting around a city. In order to get a like-for-like comparison the company took the cost of a single ticket on an underground system, bus or tram for a journey of 10 kilometres or 10 stops.

Urbs Media looked at the data paying particular attention to 20 cities with strong connections to London or those in countries that had significant migrant populations living and working in the UK.  (See the table below).

Copenhagen is the most expensive for public transport, followed by its Swedish neighbour, Stockholm, and then London.  New York and Paris are both cheaper, but people who have moved to the capital from Warsaw, Bucharest, or New Delhi will notice a big price difference.  Kiev has the cheapest public transport of any city surveyed.

The results do not take account of the lower prices for season tickets, which would reduce the cost in London and in other cities too.  Nor does it factor in the quality or reliability of the service.

City Public Transport ($US) Taxi fare ($US)
Berlin 2.89 14.78
Bucharest 0.46 3.31
Copenhagen 4.63 15.43
Dublin 3.31 11.35
Geneva 3.12 20.58
Hong Kong 1.28 3.65
Johannesburg 0.79 6.34
Kiev 0.16 1.59
London 4.04 10.09
Madrid 1.98 11.35
New Delhi 0.37 1.54
New York 2.75 11.67
Oslo 3.80 32.10
Paris 1.95 12.43
Rome 1.62 14.24
Stockholm 4.17 18.56
Sydney 2.58 11.52
Toronto 2.43 15.88
Vilnius 0.90 4.52
Warsaw 0.91 5.64

London comes out a little better for the cost of taking a taxi. Looking at the price of a 5 kilometre cab ride within the city, New Delhi offers the cheapest option. London is more expensive than Hong Kong, Bucharest and Warsaw, but cheaper than Sydney, New York, Paris, Rome, Madrid or Berlin.  But none compare to the astronomical cost of a cab ride in Oslo – three times the price of London.

UBS conducted the survey in March and April 2015.  It has carried out the price and earning survey annually since 1971.

Source data

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Tube Delays: Waterloo and City Line

Tube stationThe Waterloo and City Line connects Waterloo railway station with Bank in the City of London. With two stations and no stops in between, it is the most efficient line on the network in terms of time lost through disruption.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 12,314 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Waterloo and City Line. This is the best performance on the network.

LCH Waterloo City

As the chart shows, with few other issues to contend with, isolated strike action is responsible for a very high proportion of the lost hours.

The Waterloo and City Line is the shortest line travelling 1.47 miles in 4 minutes. It carries fewer passengers than any other Tube line. It was known by its passengers as “The Drain”, possible due to the seepage of water into the tunnels.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

Tube Delays: Victoria Line

Tube mapPassengers are the main cause of delays on the Victoria Line. Members of the public were behind 35% of the time lost to disruption on the line in 2014/15. That’s double the rate for any other line.

Delays caused by what TfL calls “customers and public action” include commuters taking ill, items dropped on the track and people jumping in front of trains. Documents published by TfL reveal that more than 20 people a year kill themselves on the Underground.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 129,010 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Victoria Line. This makes it one of the better performers.

LCH Victoria

The Victoria Line was the first to introduce automated operations where the train is controlled by computer overseen by a driver. These types of automated systems are also in use on the Central and Jubilee lines but only on the Victoria Line do they feature as a significant cause of Lost Customer Hours. They were blamed for 13% of the delays last year on this line.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Tube Delays: Piccadilly Line

Tube escalatorSignal problems are the biggest cause of disruption on the Piccadilly line.

Staff issues, including industrial action and problems with the train fleet are the other significant issues.

Delays are measured by what TfL call Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

 

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 205,014 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Piccadilly Line.

LCH Piccadilly

The Piccadilly ranks in 4th place for the worst record on the network, but it has improved considerably in the past 10 years. It has reduced Lost Customer Hours by 69% in the pas 3 years compared to 2003/06.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

Tube Delays: Northern Line

commuters tube escalatorThe Northern Line, formerly known as the misery line, has seen the best rate of improvement over the past decade in reducing the level of delays.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 139,252 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Northern line.

LCH NOrthern

Comparing its recent performance with the average for 2003/06 shows a reduction in LCH of 76%, the best record on the network.

The line has one of the highest proportions of disruption caused by passengers. This accounted for 27% of the delays in 2014/15 compared to 17% across the network.

Delays caused by what TfL calls “customers and public action” include commuters taking ill, items dropped on the track and people jumping in front of trains. Documents from TfL show that more than 20 people a year kill themselves on the Underground.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Tube Delays: Metropolitan Line

Oyster Reader Tom Page Wikimedia commonsThe Metropolitan Line is the oldest on the Tube network and the oldest underground line in the world, starting life in 1863 as the Metropolitan Railway running between Paddington and Farringdon.

Despite its age it has one of the lowest levels of delays on the network. Signal failure is the main cause of lost time, accounting for 23% of delays, compared to a network average of 14%.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 94,441 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Metropolitan line.

LCH Metropol

Along with the District, Circle, and Hammersmith and City lines a modernisation project is about to get underway on the Metropolitan including up dates to the signals system, which TfL admits “belongs in a museum” although still functions safely.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

Tube Delays: Jubilee Line

Tube stationThe Jubilee is the newest Tube line but it faces an age-old problem for every urban underground – delays caused by its passengers. This was the single biggest factor in 2014/15 causing 22% of time lost compared to 17% for the whole network.

Delays caused by what TfL calls “customers and public action” include commuters taking ill, items dropped on the track and people jumping in front of trains. The grim “person under a train…” message is familiar and more than 20 people a year kill themselves on the Underground.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 292,033 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Jubilee line. This makes it the second highest on the network after the Central line.

LCH Jubilee

While the Jubilee line has seen an improvement over the past 10 years in Lost Customer Hours the numbers rose slightly at the start of 2015/16 year in April.

The Jubilee line is the only line to see “stations” listed as a significant source of delay. Although the line was opened as recently as 1979 a number of its stations date back 100 years and were used by other lines originally. The line was extended in the 1990s though the Docklands to Stratford.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Tube Delays: District Line

Girl's boots-2Signal failure is the biggest single factor that caused delays on the District Line in 2014/15, which will come as little surprise to its passengers.  35% of the time lost though delays was caused by signal problems compared to just 14% for the whole Tube network

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 222,088 Lost Customer Hours per period on the line. This makes it the third highest on the network.

LCH District-2

Over the past 10 years as Lost Customer Hours have been reduced across the network the District line has reduced LCH by 57% comparing the average for 2003/06 with 2012/15.

TfL’s next round of modernisation work will target 3 of the oldest tube lines, including the District line, to upgrade a signaling system that the company says “belongs in a museum, having been operating safely, but in a very basic way, since the early years of the last century.”

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

Tube Delays: Circle/Hammersmith and City Lines

tube train interiorStaff issues accounted for nearly 40% of the delays on the Circle and Hammersmith and City Lines in 2014/15. About half of this was simply staff absence and shortages.

As with other lines, signals failures, train fleet problems and action by customers were the big factors.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 165,973 Lost Customer Hours per period on the lines. This makes it middle ranking in terms of performance across the network.

LCH Circle Hamm

Over the past 10 years as Lost Customer Hours have been reduced across the network the Circle and Hammersmith and City lines have shown one of the biggest improvements with a 63% reduction in LCH comparing the average for 2003/06 with 2012/15

Since 2009 the Circle and the Hammersmith and City line have operated as a end-to-end service, perhaps more a spiral than a circle running from Hammersmith to Edgware Road via Aldgate.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Tube Delays: Central Line

tube speeding pastThe Central Line suffered the highest level of delays of any line on the Tube network in 2014/15. Apart from industrial action, which happens in one off events, the biggest cause of delay was train fleet problems. This accounted for more delays on the Central Line than any other.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 410,144 Lost Customer Hours per period on the line. That is 29% higher than the second most delayed line, the Jubilee.

LCH Central

Over the past 10 years as Lost Customer Hours have been reduced across the network the Central line has remained a persistent offender. It has shown the least improvement in all lines since 2003/04.

The Central Line opened in in 1900 and its flat fare of 2 old pennies from Bank to Shepherd’s Bush earned it the nickname of the Tuppenny Tube. In the 1990s it became the second line after the Victoria to introduce automated operations where the train is largely controlled by a computer system monitored by a driver. Unlike the Victoria Line, automated operations are not a significant cause of lost hours on the line.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest