750 new cases of female genital mutilation identified over summer

More than 750 women and girls who had been subjected to Female Genital Mutilation were recorded by the NHS in London over the summer.

More than half the newly recorded cases in the UK were in London, according to the data for July to September released this month by the Heath and Social Care Information Centre.

Photo: Redkaya ┃Shutterstock.com

Photo: Redkaya ┃Shutterstock.com

Female Genital Mutilation, or FGM, is the removal of all or part of the female genitals for non-medical reasons. It is a traditional practice in a number of African countries but it is illegal in the UK.

The law was strengthened in 2003 to prevent girls being taken overseas to undergo FGM. This is thought to be particularly prevalent during the long school summer holidays which have been termed the ‘cutting season’.

The newly recorded cases do not necessarily indicate that the procedure had been recently carried out on these women. Rather it is when the NHS recorded their case. In around half the cases the women reported the FGM themselves.

The country of origin is not known for many of the women. Where origin is recorded, the national figures show the largest number of women is from Africa, particularly East Africa, and especially Somalia.

A previous study by City University and the human rights organisation Equality Now, reported by Urbs, estimated that as many as 87,000 women and girls across the capital may have undergone FGM. Brent and Southwark had the largest number of cases.

FGM

The NHS began collecting quarterly statistics on newly identified cases in 2014. So far the data has been collected largely from acute or hospital trusts, but from October it became mandatory for GP surgeries to also make submission. This may well cause the number of recorded victims to rise in the coming months.

Source data

See also

Thousands of women and girls with FGM living across London

Mapping Londoners: Born in Somalia

 

As the Met faces cuts to officers, how many patrol your borough?

Police_sagar simkhada shutterstock_333009221-1

Photo: sagar simkhada ┃Shutterstock.com

How many police officers does it take to keep London safe? As the Metropolitan Police faces up to budget cuts that will see it forced to save around £800m in the next 4 years that is the question facing the Commissioner, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe.

In an interview with LBC he said: If we could keep at least 30,000 cops, I can make this city safe. If it’s below that, I start to get worried.” With the Commissioner already suggesting that cuts could mean losing 5,000 or more, it seems that he is going to get worried.

The latest data for September this year shows that the Met currently has 31,780 officers. Of those, 18,141 are allocated to what it calls Territorial Policing. That is the day-to-day local policing done at borough level. The largest number is in Westminster, the borough that covers much of central London with large numbers of visitors by day and revelers each night.

Police numbers

 

The rest are allocated to specialist units covering particular crimes like murder or gang violence, or particular operational areas like air support and mounted police.

The average ratio of officers in Territorial Policing to the population of the boroughs is 2.1 per 1,000 people. It is higher in some central areas, particularly Westminster.

Police numbers ratio pop

Looking at the number of officers in relation to what the Met has identified as priority crimes (violence, robbery, theft, burglary) shows a higher caseload for officers in some North London boroughs. In Brent and Islington there are 23 priority crimes per officer. South of the river in Lambeth and Southwark there are 18 and 19.

Haringey and Lewisham offer a good comparison. They have a similar number of officers and ratios of officers to population, but the rate of priority crimes per officer is 21 in Haringey and 17 in Lewisham.

Police numbers ratio crime

Following the terrorist attacks in Paris Sir Bernard said that he wants to increase the number of armed police in the Specialist Firearms Command above the current 2,000 level. If the cuts are to fall most heavily on Territorial Policing it may be the boroughs in North London that feel the greatest impact.

Source data

See also

The Met fails to reflect the face of people it’s policing

Police Taser some young and elderly, and firing is up steeply in some areas

Concern about knife crime but rise is small and level well below 2011

Thousands reoffend while on probation but rates are declining

Prison sign StockCube.shutterstock_62859043-1

Photo: StockCube ┃Shutterstock.com

Thousands of offenders who are being supervised by the probation service commit further crimes within 3 months. But the rate of reoffending by those on probation is going down in London. The city has the second lowest rate of reoffending in England and Wales for offenders who are being monitored by the Probation Service.

The latest figures from the Ministry of Justice show that during 2013 the Probation Service across London had a caseload of 92,607. These were offenders under supervision orders – either issued by a court or following their release from prison on license. Out of this caseload, 8.1% reoffended.

At regional level London has the second lowest reoffending rate in England and Wales. Only the West Midlands is lower.

Reoffending regional chart-2

London has had reoffending rates consistently lower than predicted since 2010.

Within London, Hammersmith and Fulham has the worst record with 12.9% committing a further offence while under probation supervision. Kingston, Kensington and Chelsea and Tower Hamlets have rates approaching 10%.

Southwark, Greenwich and Bromley had much better results during 2013. The reoffending rate in Bromley was below 7% while Southwark and Greenwich have rates that have been consistently lower than predicted.

Reoffending map

While these figures indicate some success for the Probation Service they do not show the full picture on reoffending. The data does not include youth crime or offenders over 22 who have been released from a custodial sentence of less than a year, as they do not receive probation supervision.

The broader data on reoffending from the Ministry of Justice shows that the rate for all adult and juveniles, not just those under probation supervision, was 26.5% in England and Wales in 2013, and this rate has been fairly stable since 2003.

The age group with the highest rate of reoffending is those under 14 where 38% commit a further offence within 12 months. People convicted of theft are most likely to reoffend – 43% commit a further crime with 12 months.

Source data

See also

Concern about knife crime but rise is small and level well below 2011

Crime down nearly a third in 5 years on buses, Tube and trains

Crime map shows inner-outer divide

How the obesity rate doubled for the class of 2007

dreamstime_s_9910135The rate of obesity in primary school children in London doubles between Reception and Year 6. And the capital has the biggest problem of any region in the country with children who are overweight or classified as obese.

The findings come from analysis by Urbs Media of data from the National Child Measurement Programme over the last 9 years. Under this programme children are measured and weighed at the start and the end of primary school. It was set up by the government to help tackle obesity and covers children in all state schools, with around 95% taking part.

The most recent figures are for the 2013-14 school year and show that more than a fifth of children in Year 6 in London are classified as obese. That is more than double the rate for children in reception.

child obesity London

And this is not a recent phenomenon. Data going back to the 2006-07 school year shows a similar doubling in rates of obesity.

The Year 6 children from last year entered the school system in 2007. The data for that year shows that of the 74,235 Reception children measured, 10.8% or 8,017 were classified as obese.   In Year 6, 78,642 were measured. Many of the children may be different as families leave and arrive in the capital. But many will be the same. The rate of obesity for the class of 2007 had doubled by age 11.

London’s record looks even grimmer when children who are classified as overweight are added. In London, 38% of 11-year-olds are classified as overweight or obese. The North East and the West Midland have a very similar proportion of overweight 11-year-olds but a slightly lower rate of obese children.

child obesity regional

The Body Mass Index (BMI) is used to calculate levels of body fat to indicate whether someone is classified as underweight, healthy weight, overweight or obese. For most adults a BMI above 30 indicates obesity. The index levels for each classification vary for children to take account of difference in growth rates at different ages.

The data for London shows a largely capital-wide problem with 7 boroughs (Hackney, Westminster, Tower Hamlets, Newham, Barking and Dagenham, Lambeth and Southwark) with more that a quarter of Year 6 pupils classified as obese. Richmond stands out by having a much lower level. It also has a lower level of obese 5-year-olds, just 6%.

child obesity map

London has a better record on adult obesity than other regions of the country but the National Child Measurement Programme data shows a significant problem for youngsters that will lead to serious health issues in later lifer.

Much has been done in the recent year to raise awareness of the need for a good diet and the risks of being overweight. Despite that, the data shows that this has been  a consistent problem and it is not going away.

Source data

BMI calculator

See also

Thousands of children sent to hospital because of tooth decay

Size matters – and it depends where you live

A prosperity divide and neither rich nor poor seem happy

© Acmanley | Dreamstime.com - London Street Art Photo

Photo: © Acmanley | Dreamstime.com

The people of Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea and Camden are among the wealthiest on average in the UK, but money is not buying them happiness, as they are more miserable than many across the country.

These findings emerge in an index that looks at the combination of wealth and life satisfaction to indicate levels of prosperity. It suggests that 6 London boroughs (Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London) are the most prosperous in the country. But 4 others (Bexley, Greenwich, Brent and Croydon) are in the bottom 10 of 170 areas assessed.

The high prosperity scores for London boroughs are based largely on wealth not well-being. The Legatum Institute, a think tank that says that it is focused on promoting prosperity, put the index together. It used GDP per capita as a measure of wealth and the life satisfaction data collected by the Office for National Statistics.

Residents in Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London, enjoy an average income of £133,000. 15 of the top 20 areas in the UK for average earnings, including Tower Hamlets, Hackney, Newham, Lambeth, Southwark, Lewisham, Haringey and Islington, are in London. But the spread of wealth is not uniform across the capital and some boroughs come at the lower end of the table. Redbridge, Waltham Forest, Enfield and Barking and Dagenham have average earnings of £14,300.

What is common to all London boroughs however is the low level of life satisfaction. The happiest place in the UK according the ONS measure is the Outer Hebrides. Out of 170 areas the only London borough to squeeze into the top 50 is Bromley at 49 in the rankings.

Wealthy Hammersmith and Fulham and Kensington and Chelsea are down in the mid 80s and only 6 other boroughs (Ealing, Merton, Sutton, Kingston, Richmond and Hounslow) make it into the top 100.

While residents of Camden and the City of London come top for earnings they are in the bottom 10 when it comes to happiness, along with Croydon and Brent. Haringey and Islington folk also seem to be miserable – 11th from bottom in the life satisfaction rankings.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Pay rates underline gap between rich and poor boroughs

Welcome to the city of the super rich

 

 

Growing illegal dumping problem costs £20 million to clear up

Sebastian Ballard [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http---creativecommons.org-licenses-by-sa-2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons-1.jpg

Photo: Sebastian Ballard ┃CC BY-SA 2.0

Clearing up illegally dumped rubbish cost taxpayers in London nearly £20 million in the last financial year.   8 of the 10 councils in the country with the biggest problem for fly-tipping are in London, and the problem is getting worse with a 12% increase in dumping incidents in the past 12 months.

Newham has the biggest problem in the country, as it did in the previous year, with more than 70,000 incidents recorded. Enfield had more than 50,000, a 57% increase on 2013/14. In comparison there were fewer than 1,000 recorded incidents in Kingston.

The clear up costs in Newham alone came to £3.34 million. Haringey and Enfield are both paying in excess of £2 million and Croydon and Southwark paid more than a million.

Fly-tipping in London
Number of incidents Clear-up costs
Newham 70,192 £3,339,219
Enfield 50,121 £2,015,058
Haringey 25,709 £2,193,945
Southwark 25,583 £1,063,934
Croydon 18,560 £1,568,123

Newham says that the large number of incidents may be down to better reporting thanks to 7-day a week street cleaning and improved technology for recording incidents.

Two thirds of the incidents in Newham involved fly-tipping on roadsides. Among the things dumped were 1,200 so-called white goods, such as fridges and washing machines.

Enfield recorded 1,322 incidents of fly-tipping on railway lines. It is a problem peculiar to the area as next nearest council with such incidents was Lewisham with just 7.

Clearing up in Haringey and Croydon costs double that of the other boroughs with the most substantial problems. The cost per incident in Croydon was £84.48 while in Newham and Enfield it is around half that. Haringey and Southwark recorded a very similar number of incidents but the clear up costs in Haringey are double those of Southwark.

The data gathered from the councils show that Enfield prosecuted 249 people for fly-tipping, more than any other London council. Newham took action in more than 8,000 cases, half of which involved a warning letter. It issued more than 2,000 fixed penalty notices fines and in a statement said that it had prosecuted 318 people for fly-tipping and littering, but no prosecutions for fly-tipping are recorded in the data from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Source data

See also

Fly-tipping hits 5 year high with Newham suffering the biggest problem

London is rubbish at recycling and many boroughs are getting worse

Emission targets at risk as growing population hits greener city plan

 

Anxious, unhappy, dissatisfied with life? Perhaps you live in Hackney or Barking?

despair

How happy are you? Did you feel anxious yesterday? Are you satisfied with life, and does your life feel worthwhile? These are the questions the Office for National Statistics has been asking since 2010 to try to understand the nation’s well-being.

The most recent rankings show that people in Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea are most pleased with their lot in life while those in Barking and Dagenham, Hackney and Lambeth seem to have little to smile about.

The results are based upon a national survey carried out by the ONS that questions around 120,000 people nationally and over 13,000 in London. The responses indicate a greater sense of well-being in south and west London, in line with the GLA’s own well-being index, previously reported by Urbs.

When it comes to satisfaction with life the small resident population of the City of London came out top, closely followed by Kensington. At the other end of the scale the survey respondents in Barking and Dagenham and Lambeth were least satisfied.

ONS Well-being Survey
How satisfied are you with your life?
Most Satisfied Least satisfied
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
Richmond Camden
Southwark Hackney
Merton Greenwich

There was a similar result at the top and bottom of the rankings when it came to whether life felt worthwhile.

ONS Well-being Survey
To what extent do you feel the things you do in your life are worthwhile?
Worthwhile Not worthwhile
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Hillingdon Hackney
Bexley Camden
Richmond Brent

In terms of happiness the affluent areas of Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea score well once more, and Bromley on the southern outer edge of the capital also has happy residents. Hackney and Barking and Dagenham feature again but at the wrong end of the rankings.

ONS Well-being Survey
How happy did you feel yesterday?
Most happy Least happy
Kensington and Chelsea Hackney
Bromley Barking and Dagenham
Richmond Hammersmith and Fulham
Barnet Waltham Forest
Hounslow Westminster

As well as being unhappy the survey respondents in Hackney and Barking and Dagenham were also the most anxious people in the capital. As their boroughs feature in the bottom 5 in all 4 categories perhaps that’s not surprising.

ONS Well-being Survey
How anxious did you feel yesterday?
Least anxious Most anxious
Enfield Hackney
Barnet Barking and Dagenham
Harrow Lambeth
Newham Southwark
Hillingdon Islington

The least anxious were not in the affluent areas that scored well in other categories but in the North London boroughs of Enfield, Barnet and Harrow.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Are you a north of the river or south of the river Londoner?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over 50% of London babies have mothers born outside the UK

Baby hand

More than half the babies in London last year were born to mothers who were from outside the UK. Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that 58% of new Londoners had mothers who were born outside the UK.  That’s more than double the national rate as across the country non-UK mums account for 27% of births.

In 3 boroughs, Newham, Westminster and Brent, three quarters of the births were to mothers from outside the UK. Since 2004 Newham has had the highest rate in the country for births by women born overseas. Last year it was 76.4%.

The boroughs with the lowest rates of births to mothers born overseas are Havering, Bromley and Bexley. With 28% non UK-born mothers Havering comes closest to the national average.

Mothers born outside UK

National data shows that Poland, Pakistan and India are the most common countries of birth for mothers who are not UK-born. The Polish-born population of the UK has increased 10-fold in the past 10 years.

Of the 127,000 babies born in London in 2014, 25,000 had mothers born in Asia or the Middle East, 20,000 had mothers born in the EU, the majority in newer EU members, which includes Poland, and nearly 17,000 had mothers from Africa.

Across London the most common region of birth for mothers from outside the UK varies from borough to borough. In 6 of the 14 inner London boroughs, including Haringey and Islington, it is the EU. In 10 of the 19 outer London boroughs, including Hillingdon, Harrow, Redbridge and Sutton, it is Asia and the Middle East. For 8 boroughs, including Lewisham, Southwark and Barking and Dagenham, it is Africa.

Source data

See also

Muhammad and Amelia top London’s baby name charts, again

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

Our multi-lingual city – English second language for half of primary pupils

Mapping Londoners: Born in Ghana

Ghanaian-born Londoners are the third biggest African group by birth after Nigerians and Somalis. There are 63,000 of them and they are dispersed across the capital, according to data from the last census.

The largest numbers are in Croydon and Southwark with substantial communities in Newham, Lambeth and Enfield.

Ghana was a British colony and known as the Gold Coast until it gained independence in 1957. As a result Ghanaians have a long history of settling in the UK.

Born in Ghana

Source data

More population maps

Rise in rough sleepers adds to the problem on Westminster’s streets

© Clearvista | Dreamstime.com-2

Photo: © Clearvista | Dreamstime

The number of people sleeping on the streets has gone up by 11%. While there are people sleeping rough in every London borough the figures are dominated by the central area of Westminster which accounts for well over a third.

The Combined Homelessness and Information Network (CHAIN) says that from April to June this year 2,775 people were seen sleeping rough. That’s 11% up on the same period last year and 18% up on the previous quarter, January to March.

Of this number 1,447 were seen for the first time and new to the streets, 968 were intermittent rough sleepers, who had been seen before, and 391 people were deemed to be living on the street, including 31 of the newly identified people.

As our map shows, the scale of the problem in Westminster where more than 1,000 people were seen dwarfs the number of rough sleepers across other London boroughs. Camden has the second highest number and around 140 people were seen in Lambeth, Southwark and Tower Hamlets.

Rough sleepers Q1 2015

115 people seen at Heathrow inflate the number for Hillingdon.  14 people were judged by CHAIN to be sleeping along bus routes.  Fewer than 10 rough sleepers were seen in Kingston, Bexley and Havering.

As previously reported by Urbs, Central and Eastern Europeans make up a significant proportion of rough sleepers in London. Figures for the last quarter show that 41% of those seen were British and 36% were from Central and Eastern Europe. Of those, more than half were Romanian and about a quarter were Polish.

Source data

See also

Homeless Romanians help drive up rough sleeper numbers

Cap on benefits hits London hardest

1 in 3 kids growing up in out-of-work households in parts of London