Most Londoners are within a 15 minute car journey of hospital

© Slawekkozaks | Dreamstime.com - Entrance Accident & Emergency Department Royal London Hospital Photo-2

Photo: © Slawekkozaks | Dreamstime.com

The area near Hampton Court Palace is a fine riverside location to live, but it’s not so good if you need to drive to a hospital.

The Hampton neighbourhood is identified in government statistics as the place with the longest average journey time by car to get to a hospital in London.  The average journey for the 826 residents of this area is 28 minutes, almost double the London average.

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Google Maps, contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right 2013

Outer London boroughs like Richmond, Havering and Barking and Dagenham all have longer average journey times than central areas.  The average journey by car to hospital for residents in these areas is 17 minutes. In Hammersmith and Fulham and the City of London it is just 11 minutes.

The added factor for Richmond is that there is no hospital in the borough. The nearest are in Kingston or Hammersmith.

A comparison of the 4,600 local neighbourhoods, or LSOA, as they are referred in statistical studies reveals fairly uniform journey times across London for a car journey to hospital.

Car journey to hoptial

But if you are without a car and relying on public transport or walking to visit a sick relative or friend then your journey is more of a postcode lottery.  The average time in London is 28 minutes.  It’s a fraction of that in the City, but in the Rainham and Wennington areas of Havering the journey takes nearly an hour.

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See also

Availability of public transport below average in all outer boroughs

Thousands of children sent to hospital because of tooth decay

Areas where pensioners most likely to be lonely identified

 

 

Lib Dem’s London collapse a consolation prize for Labour

Voters in London © Slawekkozaks | Dreamstime.com

Voters in London © Slawekkozaks | Dreamstime.com

As the Labour Party picks over the disaster of election night London offers some small consolation.   Labour bucked the national trend in the capital to increase its MPs by 7, taking 45 of the 73 seats.  Those gains came largely at the expense of the Liberal Democrats as Labour not the Conservatives became beneficiaries of the Lib Dem collapse.

Labour’s success and the calamity for the Lib Dems is underlined in the voting share.  Labour’s share was up by 24%, the Lib Dems share plummeted by 64%. Ukip quadrupled their vote and the Greens doubled theirs from last time.  The Conservatives had a modest increase in votes but were down by one seat at the end of the night.

 

Voting share 2015

3.5 million people turned out to vote.  That’s up by 100,000 on 2010 and is a 65.6% turnout, a little below the national figure. The way votes were cast across the capital gives an insight into the politics of the city, more complex than the simple, first past the post constituency results. If seats were decided by a simple proportion of the share of the vote London MPs would look a lot different

 

General Election seats and shareVoting shares within constituencies give an insight into the spread of polical support in the city. The most fervent Labour supporting place is East Ham, where Stephen Timms romped home with 77% of the vote and the largest majority of any London MP.  The most Conservative constituency is Richmond Park where 34,404 people voted to re-elect Zac Goldsmith.

Ukip support is strongest in Hornchurch and Upminster, where Lawrence Webb got 13,977 votes and one of the party’s many second places.  Ukip also polled strongly in Barking, and Dagenham and Rainham.

Highest turnout in the capital was 77% in Twickenham where the senior Liberal Democrat Cabinet minister, Vince Cable, lost the seat he had held for 18 years. Lowest turnout was 54% in Ilford South.

The spread of voting patterns meant tight battles in many constituencies.  None tighter than Croydon Central where Conservative Gavin Barwell squeaked in with a majority of 165.

The capital also showed an enthusiasm for political diversity.  499 candidates put themselves up for election. Voters in Bethnal Green and Bow, Camberwell and Peckham, and Hackney South and Shoreditch had 11 candidates to choose from.  In Uxbridge and South Ruislip there was a choice of 13, among them London’s least successful candidate, Independent James Jackson who got just 14 votes.

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