Borough Profile: Lewisham 

People

Lewisham has a population of 299,817, that’s 3.5% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 34.9 years old, that’s 1 year younger than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 21% of the population compared to 9% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 47% of the residents. 31% of the people living in Lewisham were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Jamaica and makes up 4% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Nigeria. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Romania and Italy.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £315,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 17% owning their home outright and a further 32% with a mortgage compared to 24% who rent privately and a further 28% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,355.

Crime

The crime rate in Lewisham is 77 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84 .

The Area

Lewisham covers an area of 3,515 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 23% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Lewisham is above the national average with 76% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £32,757 and for women it is lower at £30,151.  The median income for a household in the borough is £43,360.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 53% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 6% have no qualifications and 4% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 76,507 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.7 cars per household.  Lewisham is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 13.1% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Lewisham can expect to live until they are 79, for women life expectancy is 83 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 190.8 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 6% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 24% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.2 out of 10, which is below average for London.

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Source Data

Borough Profile: Lambeth 

People

There are 325,455 people living in Lambeth, that’s 3.8% of the 8.6 million Londoners.

The average age of the population is 34.4 years old, that’s 1.5 years younger than the London average. There are more children in the borough than pensioners. Children and young people under 16 make up 18% of the population compared to 8% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 42% of the residents. 34% of the people living in Lambeth were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Jamaica and makes up 3% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Portugal. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Spain and Italy.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £420,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 11% owning their home outright and a further 25% with a mortgage compared to 34% who rent privately and a further 30% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,239.

Crime

The crime rate in Lambeth is 105 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is higher than the London average of 84 and is among the highest in the capital.

The Area

Lambeth covers an area of 2,681 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 17% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Lambeth is above the national average with 79% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £0 and for women it is lower at £30,729.  The median income for a household in the borough is £48,610.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 65% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 6% have no qualifications and 2% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 66,791 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.5 cars per household.  Lambeth is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 20.2% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Lambeth can expect to live until they are 79, for women life expectancy is 83 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 205.0 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 5% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 27% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.1 out of 10, which is below average for London.

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Source Data

Borough Profile: Kingston upon Thames

 People

Kingston upon Thames has a population of 173,853, that’s 2.0% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 37.0 years old, that’s 1.1 years older than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 19% of the population compared to 13% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 30% of the residents. 29% of the people living in Kingston upon Thames were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Sri Lanka and makes up 2% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from India. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Bulgaria and Poland.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £385,000.   Owner occupiers outnumber those who rent with 28% owning their home outright and a further 39% with a mortgage compared to 22% who rent privately and a further 11% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,675.

Crime

The crime rate in Kingston upon Thames is 59 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84 and is among the lowest in the capital.

The Area

Kingston upon Thames covers an area of 3,726 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 36% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Kingston upon Thames is above the national average with 74% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £40,000 and for women it is lower at £31,387.  The median income for a household in the borough is £56,920.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 54% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 6% have no qualifications and 4% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 70,421 cars in the borough, which equates to 1.1 cars per household.  Kingston upon Thames is rated as below average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 21.1% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Kingston upon Thames can expect to live until they are 82, for women life expectancy is 85 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 140.6 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 5% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 16% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.3 out of 10, which is above average for London.

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Source Data

Borough Profile: Kensington and Chelsea 

People

There are 158,447 people living in Kensington and Chelsea, that’s 1.8% of the 8.6 million Londoners.

The average age of the population is 39.1 years old, that’s 3.2 years older than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 16% of the population compared to 14% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 30% of the residents. 55% of the people living in Kensington and Chelsea were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from United States and makes up 5% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from France. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Italy and France.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £1,195,000, the highest in London.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 23% owning their home outright and a further 15% with a mortgage compared to 33% who rent privately and a further 29% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,078.

Crime

The crime rate in Kensington and Chelsea is 121 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is among the highest in the capital.

The Area

Kensington and Chelsea covers an area of 1,212 and is the smallest borough, not counting the City of London. The largest is Bromley, which is more than 15,000 hectares.

Some 15% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Kensington and Chelsea is below the national average with 68% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £0 and for women it is lower at £0.  The median income for a household in the borough is £116,350.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 65% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 5% have no qualifications and 4% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 44,536 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.6 cars per household.  Kensington and Chelsea is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 16.2% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Kensington and Chelsea can expect to live until they are 83, for women life expectancy is 86 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 136.3 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 4% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 22% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.6 out of 10, which is above average for London.

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Source Data

 

Borough Profile: Islington

People

Islington has a population of 228,397, that’s 2.7% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 34.7 years old, that’s 1.2 years younger than the London average. There are more children in the borough than pensioners. Children and young people under 16 make up 16% of the population compared to 9% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 32% of the residents. 37% of the people living in Islington were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Ireland and makes up 3% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Turkey. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Italy and France.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £530,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 15% owning their home outright and a further 24% with a mortgage compared to 26% who rent privately and a further 35% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,276.

Crime

The crime rate in Islington is 121 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is among the highest in the capital.

The Area

Islington covers an area of 1,486 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 12% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Islington is below the national average with 73% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £39,306 and for women it is lower at £31,995.  The median income for a household in the borough is £54,950.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 63% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 6% have no qualifications and 5% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 38,629 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.4 cars per household.  Islington is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 21.0% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Islington can expect to live until they are 79, for women life expectancy is 84 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 202.8 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 5% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 23% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.2 out of 10, which is below average for London.

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Source Data

 

Borough Profile: Hounslow

People

There are 272,102 people living in Hounslow, that’s 3.2% of the 8.6 million Londoners.

The average age of the population is 35.7 years old, that’s 0.2 years younger than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 21% of the population compared to 11% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 52% of the residents. 48% of the people living in Hounslow were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from India and makes up 11% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Poland. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Romania and Poland.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £319,950.   Owner occupiers outnumber those who rent with 26% owning their home outright and a further 27% with a mortgage compared to 28% who rent privately and a further 19% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,375.

Crime

The crime rate in Hounslow is 79 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84.

The Area

Hounslow covers an area of 5,598 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 40% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Hounslow is above the national average with 74% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £0 and for women it is lower at £0.  The median income for a household in the borough is £44,490.

The workforce is among the less qualified in London with 46% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 7% have no qualifications and 3% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 94,042 cars in the borough, which equates to 1.0 cars per household.  Hounslow is rated as below average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 15.3% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Hounslow can expect to live until they are 80, for women life expectancy is 84 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 165.8 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 7% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 23% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.3 out of 10, which is above average for London.

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Source Data

 

London’s unique language landscape where 26% don’t speak English at home

crowd backs turnedMore than a quarter of Londoners don’t speak English at home.  The latest figures, for 2015, show that the proportion of people who choose another language as their first choice for speaking to family has risen to 26%.

This is a uniquely London phenomenon. Across the UK the rate is just 8.5%.  It is highest in the West Midland, where there is a significant immigrant population and in Wales, where Welsh speakers affect the numbers.

Not speaking English chart

The figures from the Office for National Statistics, based upon its Labour Force Survey,  reveal that in Newham 58% of people are using a language other than English at home. As previous data analysis by Urbs has shown, Newham is home to London’s largest Pakistani community and a significant Indian-born population.

In neighbouring Tower Hamlets, 41% are choosing another language at home above English.  The borough has the largest number of Bangladeshi-born people in the capital.

Not speaking English map

In north London, 45% in Harrow and 43% in Brent will speak other languages ahead of English among the family.  Both boroughs have large Indian-born populations.

Ealing is home to London’s largest Polish-born population, and a significant Indian-born community, which may explain why 38% of people use a language other than English at home.

The rates are only at or below the national average in 2 boroughs, Richmond and Havering.

According to the latest population estimates, 37% of Londoners, or 3 million people, were foreign-born while 23% or 2 million people are not British citizens.

This is leading to a multi-lingual city full of bi-lingual people.  Department of Education data, reported by Urbs, shows that nearly half the primary school children and 40% of the secondary pupils in London do not speak English as their first language. In some boroughs three quarters of the students speak English as a second language.

The concern for social inclusion is those who speak no English at all. Data from the last census in 2011 revealed that there are 45,000 people, mostly women, who say that they cannot speak the language.  The Prime Minister has announced a £20 million programme of English tuition but was criticised for his targeting of Muslim women, although they are the largest group.

Source data

See also

Our multi-lingual city – English second language for half of primary pupils

East London likely focal point for PM’s English tuition for Muslim women

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

Poles and Pakistanis help shape the multi-cultural make up of the city

Mapping Londoners: Born in Russia

London has been a magnet for wealthy Russians in recent years with many investing in expensive property, and in one case buying a football club. This influx of super rich was documented at the start of 2015 in the aptly titled BBC programme Rich, Russian and living in London.

The data from the 2011 census shows that 60% of Russians who are registered as resident in London live in central areas. Their love of expensive properties in Mayfair and Chelsea is reflected by the fact that Westminster and Kensington and Chelsea are the boroughs with the largest numbers of Russian residents.

Camden, Barnet and Tower Hamlets all have communities of around 1,000.   Other boroughs have groups in the hundreds giving a total of 16,575, the 49th largest non UK-born population in the city.

Born in Russia

More recent data from the Annual Population Survey (a little less reliable than the hard numbers of the census) indicates that the number of Russians in London is declining. It suggests that numbers peaked at 18,000 in 2012 but have now fallen back to 11,000.

Source data

See also

Mapping Londoners: Born in Lithuania

Mapping Londoners: Born in the USA

Mapping Londoners: Born in Poland

More population maps

 

 

 

Mapping Londoners: Born in Denmark

The number of Danes who are resident in London appears to be increasing. According to the last census in 2011, 7,870 people said they were born in Denmark. That was around half the number from Sweden.

But the latest estimate from the Annual Population Survey (a little less reliable than the census as it is based on a survey sample) suggests that the number of Danish born Londoners has climbed to 11,000 and is now higher than the Swedish population of the capital by 1,000.

The census data reveals that Danes, like Swedes, choose to live centrally with Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea, and Camden with the largest populations. Hackney, Wandsworth and Ealing are also popular choices to for a home.

Danes are spread a little more evenly across the boroughs than other Scandinavians.

Source data

Mapping Londoners: Born in Sweden

Mapping Londoners: Born in Norway

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Mapping Londoners: Born in Norway

Norway has a population of around 5.1 million, that’s same as the outer London boroughs, so it is hardly surprising that with a relatively small population few are found in London.

According to the last census in 2011 there are 5,385 people born in Norway who are resident in capital. They are the smallest Scandinavian group, with Swedes outnumbering them 3:1.

As with other Scandinavian nationalities, Westminster is the most popular place to live. The other large group is clustered in Wandsworth and Merton. Apart from that, a semi-circle of central London boroughs from Kensington and Chelsea to Tower Hamlets have the most Norwegian residents.

With such a small group there is no estimate from the Annual Population Survey for how the numbers may have changed since the 2011 census.

Source data

 

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