Motorists pay £235 million in parking fines but number of tickets is falling

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The number of parking tickets issued in London went down by 6% last year but motorists across the city still forked out £235 million in fines.

There were 3.82 million penalty charge notices stuck on windscreens for on-street parking offences in the financial year 2014/15. In 2006/07 it was over 5 million.

Lambeth and Haringey make the most money from parking tickets. Both boroughs have penalty charge incomes of £18 million, according to their returns to the Department for Communities and Local Government. Their neighbours make a fraction of that, £8 million in Brent and £3 million in Southwark.

Westminster, which has larger traffic flows than Haringey and Lambeth, made £17.6 million from penalty charge notices.

Parking fines map

Motorist may feel that they are hunted by uniformed parking wardens, but the number of tickets issued and the resulting fines has been falling over successive years. Traffic volumes in London are on a downward trend but went up marginally last year due to increases in eastern areas. Traffic volumes in central areas, where the demand for parking is highest, have fallen, as reported by Urbs.

Parking fines income

Parking is big business in London. It generated £582 million for the councils in 2014/15, according to their own figures, analysed by the motoring charity, the RAC Foundation. That’s 40% of all the parking income for the UK, yet London has just 10% of the cars.

Westminster heads the table with £74 million, but its parking income has dropped in the past 12 months along with the other top earners, Kensington and Chelsea and Camden.

Parking total income

After costs are taken out London councils had a surplus of £308 million from parking. By law that money has to be re-invested in transport and environmental projects. Across the UK the surplus from parking represents 15% of the expenditure on local transport.

Source data

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