Poles and Pakistanis help shape the multi-cultural make up of the city

crowd zoom b&WThe capital’s migrant mix is shifting once more but it is not just the much reported arrival of people from Eastern Europe that is changing the multi-cultural face of the city. Data from the latest population survey carried out by the Office for National Statistics shows that South Asia and Southern Europe play a significant part too.

The biggest growth in numbers is in the Pakistani and Polish communities. Both have increased by 38,000 between 2011 and last year. Romanians, who were allowed access to work in the UK from the start of 2014, increased by 79% on 2011.

People born in India are the largest non-British group in the capital and their numbers grew by 12% over the period.

But the data also shows the Italian born population has grown by 27,000 and there are 16,000 more Spaniards. That’s an increase of more than 50% for both nationalities.

The biggest rate of growth was for Latvian’s, up 140% but numbers remain small and that high percentage represented 14,000 people.

Pop top 10

In contrast, large numbers of South Africans, Bangladeshis, Chinese and Nigerians have left London. The survey does not tell us how many returned to their country of birth and how many did what many UK born Londoners do – move to another part of the country.

Pop decline 10

The survey spoke to 27,000 people in London and more than 300,000 across the UK. The ONS warns that it is not as robust as the data in last census in 2011, and Urbs has written extensively on population profiles based on that data, but it provides the best estimates of how populations are shifting since 2011.

By comparing London and UK-wide data it is possible to identify the communities who are concentrated in the capital and those who are more dispersed across the UK.

The most London-centric group is from Ecuador. There are 14,000 in the capital; that’s 96% of the UK population. 79% of the people in the UK from the troubled Balkan state of Kosovo are in London.

But it is not just newer migrant groups that favour the capital. Ghana has a long relationship with the UK dating back through colonial times yet nearly three quarters of Ghanaian-born people in the UK are resident in London.

Pop Lon centric

In contrast, a small proportion of the small group of Slovakians in the country has chosen London. Germans seem to be widely dispersed around the UK, as do Chinese and people born in Zimbabwe.

Pop dispersed

Source data

See also

Mapping Londoners

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

Schools data reveals ethnic mix with fall in proportion of white British pupils

 

 

 

 

 

Mapping Londoners: Born in Nigeria

People born in Nigeria are the biggest group of black people by place of birth after those born in England. There are nearly 115,000 Nigerian-born Londoners, making them easily the largest African-born group, ahead of Somalis and Ghanaians. There are around 25,000 more Nigerian-born Londoners than Jamaican-born Londoners – the second largest black group by place of birth who were born outside England.

Southwark has the largest number of Nigerian-born people, followed by Greenwich and Lewisham. They are also the biggest non-English born group in Barking and Dagenham.

Born in Nigeria

Source data

More population maps

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

 

 

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

crowd backs turnedThe United Nations has 193 members, Fifa has 209 national associations but for truly comprehensive international diversity look no further than a list of the places of birth of Londoners.

With 268 places listed the city appears to be home to people from every conceivable corner of the planet and some not even born on terra firma. 1 person claims to have been born ‘in the air’, which we assume means on board a plane and 25 were born at sea.

The data is contained within the last census for the UK in which people were asked to identify their place of birth. The large number of places, in excess of UN recognised countries, is partly a product of people naming countries that no longer exist, such as Yugoslavia or the USSR or being less specific in naming Africa or the Caribbean as their place of origin.

People born in the UK have mostly been more specific in identifying the nation of their birth. As a result we know that the vast majority of Londoners, some 61% of the population, were born in England. Nearly 90,000 Londoners, just over 1% of the population, were born in Scotland. The Irish outnumber the Scots,  there are nearly 130,000 of them, plus nearly 33,000 born in Northern Ireland.

After England, the second most popular place of birth is India with just over 3% of the population. An imperial history is very evident with Nigeria, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Jamaica and Sri Lanka all featuring in the top 10 places of birth.

Anecdotally we know there are many Polish people working in London. The census data puts that into numbers – nearly 2% of the population, and Poland is the third most commonly cited place of birth for Londoners.

Population of London by place of birth
Position Place of Birth Number
1 England 4,997,072
2 India 262,247
3 Poland 158,300
4 Ireland 129,792
5 Nigeria 114,718
6 Pakistan 112,457
7 Bangladesh 109,948
8 Scotland 89,537
9 Jamaica 87,467
10 Sri Lanka 84,542

After the top 10 there is a significant drop in numbers to France in 11th place with 66,654.

Source data

See also

London drives UK population growth

Booming population will struggle to find a place to liv