Hackney has one of the highest diabetes rates in the capital

Hackney has one of the worst records in London for diabetes and the number of sufferers will climb by 10,159 the next 20 years, placing huge pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 19,678 people with diabetes in the borough, up by 446 on last year. Some 9.1% of all the people living in Hackney have the condition, which is above the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 9.4% and in 2035 will hit 10.9%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, and 3.3% of them will live in Hackney .

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

 

 

Greenwich has one of the lowest diabetes rates in capital but the problem is growing

The number of people with diabetes in Greenwich will rise by 8,014 in the next 20 years. While the borough will continue to have one of the lowest rates in London, the extra numbers will place huge pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 18,025 people with diabetes in the area, up by 429 on last year. Some 8.3% of all the people living in Greenwich have the condition, which is below the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 8.5% and in 2035 will hit 9.5%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, and 2.9% of them will live in Greenwich .

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

 

 

Enfield has one of the highest diabetes rates in the capital

Enfield has one of the worst records in London for diabetes and the number of sufferers will climb by 10,316 the next 20 years, placing huge pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 24,515 people with diabetes in the borough, up by 460 on last year. Some 9.5% of all the people living in Enfield have the condition, which is above the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 9.7% and in 2035 will hit 10.8%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, and 3.9% of them will live in Enfield .

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

 

Ealing has one of the highest diabetes rates in the capital

Ealing has one of the worst records in London for diabetes and the number of sufferers will climb by 10,373 in the next 20 years, placing huge pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 29,557 people with diabetes in the borough, up by 412 on last year. Some 10.7% of all the people living in Ealing have the condition, which is above the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 11.2% and in 2035 will hit 12.6%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, and 4.5% of them will live in Ealing .

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

City of London has one of the lowest diabetes rates in capital but the problem is growing

The number of people with diabetes in City of London will rise by 234 in the next 20 years. The area has a small resident population and will continue to have one of the lowest rates in London, but the extra numbers will place pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 590 people with diabetes in the borough, up by 13 on last year. Some 7.7% of all the people living in City of London have the condition, which is below the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 7.7% and in 2035 will hit 8.8%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035.

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

Camden has one of the lowest diabetes rates in capital but the problem is growing

Camden has one of the lowest rates of diabetes in London but the number of sufferers will go up by 7,141 in the next 20 years, placing pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 16,085 people with diabetes in the area, up by 403 on last year. Some 7.8% of all the people living in Camden have the condition, which is below the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 8.0% and in 2035 will hit 9.1%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, and 2.6% of them will live in Camden .

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

Kingston’s diabetes record is the best in the country

Kingston has the lowest rate of diabetes in London and for the whole of England. But in the next 20 years there will be an additional 4,018 sufferers in the borough, according to Public Health England, placing pressure on health services.

There are currently 9,440 people with diabetes in the area, up by 218 on last year. Just 6.7% of all the people living in Kingston have the condition, which is well below the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have crept up to 6.8% and in 2035 will reach 7.6%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, 1.5% of them will live in Kingston.

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

 

 

Growth of preventable cases of diabetes threaten the health service

Obese copy

The number of people in London suffering from diabetes will rocket by 40% over the next 20 years, according to forecasts from Public Health England.

Its figures show that in 2016 there are 638,000 people over 16 with diabetes. But rising rates coupled with a growing population means that this will go up by more than a quarter of million to 895,000 by 2035.

PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

John Newton of Public Health England said: “Developing diabetes in not an inevitable part of ageing.  We have the opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS.”

The PHE forecasts reveals a wide discrepancy in rates across the capital.  Brent has the highest rate of diabetes not only in London but in England with 11.5% of people with the condition today.  Kingston has the lowest rate in England at 6.7%.

The highest rates after Brent are in Harrow, Redbridge and Ealing. The lowest, apart from  Kingston, are in Richmond, Wandsworth and Islington.

Diabetes rate 2016

Both Brent and Kingston will retain their positions as the boroughs with the highest and lowest rates in England by 2035.  The rate in Brent will climb to 13.6% of the population.

The record in Ealing, Harrow and Redbridge will remain poor and Newham will be second only to Brent with a rate of 12.7%.

Kingston’s rate will rise to 7.6%, with neighbouring Richmond, plus Wandsworth and Islington remaining among the areas with lowest rates.

Diabetes 2035

The data shows a worsening situation throughout London over the next two decades.  Today there are seven boroughs where the prevalence of diabetes in the population is above 10%. By 2035 the rate is forecast to be one in ten or higher in 17 areas.

The biggest change in the rate of the condition between 2016 and 2035 is forecast to be in Tower Hamlets where the rate will go up by 24%.  The borough is also expected to see the biggest growth in population in the coming decades, as reported by Urbs. The combination of these factors will place severe pressure on local health services.

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

See also

Sportiest Londoners live in the wealthier south west boroughs

How the obesity rate doubled for the class of 2007

Size matters – and it depends where you live

 

750 new cases of female genital mutilation identified over summer

More than 750 women and girls who had been subjected to Female Genital Mutilation were recorded by the NHS in London over the summer.

More than half the newly recorded cases in the UK were in London, according to the data for July to September released this month by the Heath and Social Care Information Centre.

Photo: Redkaya ┃Shutterstock.com

Photo: Redkaya ┃Shutterstock.com

Female Genital Mutilation, or FGM, is the removal of all or part of the female genitals for non-medical reasons. It is a traditional practice in a number of African countries but it is illegal in the UK.

The law was strengthened in 2003 to prevent girls being taken overseas to undergo FGM. This is thought to be particularly prevalent during the long school summer holidays which have been termed the ‘cutting season’.

The newly recorded cases do not necessarily indicate that the procedure had been recently carried out on these women. Rather it is when the NHS recorded their case. In around half the cases the women reported the FGM themselves.

The country of origin is not known for many of the women. Where origin is recorded, the national figures show the largest number of women is from Africa, particularly East Africa, and especially Somalia.

A previous study by City University and the human rights organisation Equality Now, reported by Urbs, estimated that as many as 87,000 women and girls across the capital may have undergone FGM. Brent and Southwark had the largest number of cases.

FGM

The NHS began collecting quarterly statistics on newly identified cases in 2014. So far the data has been collected largely from acute or hospital trusts, but from October it became mandatory for GP surgeries to also make submission. This may well cause the number of recorded victims to rise in the coming months.

Source data

See also

Thousands of women and girls with FGM living across London

Mapping Londoners: Born in Somalia

 

Shrinking public sector employment outdone by private sector jobs growth

commuters B&W-2The proportion of jobs in the public sector is shrinking, driven by government cuts under its austerity plans but more largely by the growth in private sector employment.

744,000 people living in London work in the public sector, which includes the NHS, education, central government, local authorities, public bodies, the police and the armed forces. That is 15.3% of the workforce and one of the lowest rates in Britain. The average for England is 16.8% with rates much higher in the North East and in Wales and Scotland.

public sector jobs regional

Since 2010 there has been an 8% decline in public sector jobs. Under government plans heath and education budgets are protected so the cuts have fallen elsewhere. Some of the reduction may be attribute to reclassification. At the end of 2013 Royal Mail was privatized and in early 2014 the Lloyds Banking Group, that had been bailed out by the government and taken in to the public sector, was reclassified as private as the government sold down its share.

During the same period there has been rise of in private sector job, pushing up the proportion of private sector workers from 81% to 85% of the workforce.

This split however is not uniform across London. 27% of the employment in Greenwich is in the public sector. That’s the highest rate of any region in the UK, and neighbouring Lewisham and Newham are not that far behind. At the other extreme, there are just 3% of people in the City working in the public sector.

public sector jobs map

Government pressure to reduce the size of the public sector is likely to lead to it making up a smaller proportion of employment in the next few years. The Office for Budget Responsibility, which analyses public finances, has said that between 2010-18 it expected to see the loss of 1.1 million public sector jobs across the country.

London is fortunate in seeing private sector job growth to compensate, at least in numbers. What is not clear from this data is how successful ex-public sector workers are at finding appropriate work in private organisations.

Source data

See also

Jobs concentrated in just 5 of London’s 33 boroughs

The jobs success and housing failure causing a crisis for the capital

Jobs growth shows changing face of work