Borough Profile: Lewisham 

People

Lewisham has a population of 299,817, that’s 3.5% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 34.9 years old, that’s 1 year younger than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 21% of the population compared to 9% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 47% of the residents. 31% of the people living in Lewisham were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Jamaica and makes up 4% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Nigeria. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Romania and Italy.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £315,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 17% owning their home outright and a further 32% with a mortgage compared to 24% who rent privately and a further 28% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,355.

Crime

The crime rate in Lewisham is 77 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84 .

The Area

Lewisham covers an area of 3,515 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 23% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Lewisham is above the national average with 76% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £32,757 and for women it is lower at £30,151.  The median income for a household in the borough is £43,360.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 53% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 6% have no qualifications and 4% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 76,507 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.7 cars per household.  Lewisham is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 13.1% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Lewisham can expect to live until they are 79, for women life expectancy is 83 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 190.8 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 6% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 24% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.2 out of 10, which is below average for London.

See other borough profiles

Source Data

Lewisham has one of the highest diabetes rates in the capital

The number of people with diabetes in Lewisham will soar by 10,041 in the next 20 years, placing huge pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 22,792 people with diabetes in the area, up by 444 on last year. Some 9.5% of all the people living in Lewisham have the condition, which is above the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 9.8% and in 2035 will hit 11.1%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, and 3.7% of them will live in Lewisham .

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

 

Falling numbers for free school meals but rates still among highest in country

children legsThe number of pupils claiming free school meals is continuing to fall in London. However, there is a greater proportion of children in nursery, primary and secondary schools claiming free lunches here than in many other parts of the country.

New data from the Department of Education shows that nearly 17% of London pupils are receiving free school meals in nurseries and primaries – more than two percentage points higher than the average in England.

Only the North East and West Midlands regions have a higher proportion of youngsters on the free meal scheme.  In Tower Hamlets and Hackney more than a third of under 11s are receiving free meals. The Merseyside borough of Knowsley is the only local authority with a higher rate.

In Southwark, a fifth of children are claiming free meals, a slight increase on last year.  But the numbers are down in Lewisham and Westminster, and the largest decrease took place in Islington where 29% of pupils are claiming school meal benefits, down from 38% last year, but still the third highest rate in the capital.

Free school meals primary

The trend is similar among secondary school pupils. On average, 13% of children over 11 are on the free meal scheme across England. The rate is similar in Outer London but significantly higher within inner London, with more than 40% in Tower Hamlets and 30% in Hackney and Islington. In Camden and Lambeth it is around a quarter of secondary school children.

Free school meals secondary-2

London varies hugely with outer areas pushing the capital average down.  Boroughs in the South West score as low or lower than many other parts of the country, with both Kingston upon Thames and Richmond upon Thames averaging less than 9% for students below the age of 16 claiming free school meals.

Free school meals are available to children from families who are claiming other types of benefit for unemployment or low income.  In 2013 the government extended the scheme so that all children in reception, year 1 and year 2 at state primary schools, ie all children under 8, receive free meals.  From year 3 onwards families must register and make a claim.

Entitlement to free school meals is commonly used as an indicator for children living in poverty. But many who are entitled to the benefit do not claim, a reluctance sometimes attached to social stigma. In London this year 215,000 children are judged to be eligible but only 180,000 are receiving free meals.

Source data

See also

105,000 extra secondary pupils pose huge challenge for capital’s schools

85% of children in private school in one area of West London

Schools data reveals ethnic mix with fall in proportion of white British pupils

 

Teenage survey finds that Richmond has highest level of cannabis use

spliff-2The affluent borough of Richmond has the highest level of young people smoking cannabis in London.

A national survey of 15-year-olds found that 19% living in Richmond had tried the drug.  This is the second highest rate in England – the highest is 24% in Brighton.

Across London, 27% of 15-year-olds say that they have been offered cannabis, in line with the national rate.  A little over 1 in 10 say that they have tried smoking the drug but rates are higher in 13 boroughs.

Richmond stands out as having the highest rates, and as reported by Urbs, also has the highest proportion of teenagers drinking alcohol and getting drunk. 16% of 15 year-olds in Lambeth and Islington say they have tried cannabis, with 15% in Camden, Haringey, Lewisham and Wandsworth.

Cannabis map

Rates are much lower in the east of the capital. Just 6% in Tower Hamlets and Redbridge, 7% in Newham and 8% in Barking and Dagenham, and Havering.

The data from the What About YOUth survey reveals that young people from a mixed ethnic background are most likely to have been offered and tried cannabis.  Those from Asian backgrounds are least likely.  93% say they have never smoked the drug, according to the survey, compared to 89% of all 15-year-olds.

Richmond also has the highest rates for teenagers who say they have smoked cannabis in the last year (17%) and in the last month (8.5%).

The survey offered little evidence of a link between cannabis and other drugs. Just 3% of 15-year-olds in London say that they have tried other drugs, though rates are between 5-6% in Bromley, Haringey and Camden.

Source data

See also

Kensington teenage girls have the most negative body image in England

Teens saying no to booze, but Richmond tops list for 15-year-olds getting drunk

Low drug-related death rates hide middle-aged heroin problem

 

Elderly bear the brunt of deprivation in the capital

Hands walking stick Kristo-Gothard Hunorshutterstock_162933494

Photo: Kristo-Gothard Hunor ┃Shutterstock.com

Elderly people in London are being left behind in the fight against deprivation.

Over the past 5 years a number of boroughs that were among the most deprived local authorities in England have reduced multiple causes of deprivation in many neighbourhoods. Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Haringey have pulled themselves above the bottom 20 boroughs in England since 2010.

But in these districts and others in the capital thousands of older people are living in income deprived households.  This is a particular problem for London. Of the 10 boroughs in England with the highest level of over 60s living in income deprived households, 7 are in London including the 3 with the worst record, Tower Hamlets, Hackney and Newham.

Local authorities with the highest proportion of older people in income deprivation
1 Tower Hamlets 49.7%
2 Hackney 43.1%
3 Newham 41%
4 Manchester 36.3%
5 Islington 36.1%
6 Southwark 34.3%
7 Lambeth 33.2%
8 Liverpool 32.7%
9 Knowsley 32.6%
10 Haringey 31.8%

5 more are in the 20 most income deprived boroughs for older people – Brent, Barking and Dagenham, Hammersmith and Fulham, Camden and Lewisham.

In Tower Hamlets nearly half the old people are living in income deprived households. The borough also has the worst record on children in income deprived households with 39% of under 16s affected.  In 6 other boroughs (Islington, Hackney, Barking and Dagenham, Enfield, Lambeth and Southwark) at least 30% of children are living in income deprived households.

These figures are revealed in data gathered for the Department of Communities and Local Government for the Index on Multiple Deprivation – the government’s measure of levels of deprivation across England. The index looks at 7 areas – income, employment, education, health and disability, crime, housing and the living environment.

The government measures deprivation in small areas called LSOAs.  Each of these neighbourhoods has around 1,500 residents.  There are 32,844 of them in England and 4,835 in London.

275 of these neighbourhoods in London are among the 10% most deprived in England. London has done well in reducing deprivation over the past 5 years, but the borough map shows a clear divide with much higher levels of deprivation in the east.

Deprivation borough map

The most deprived neighbourhood in the capital, according to the index, is an area of Hackney to the south of Homerton High Street and west of Mabley Green.  This neighbourhood is home to 1,300 people.

Of the 5 most deprived neighbourhoods in London, 2 are in Hackney, 2 in Westminster and 1 in Islington. The least deprived neighbourhood, according to the index, is in Bromley.

Source data

See also

Areas where pensioners most likely to be lonely identified

Low birth weight babies in Tower Hamlets 60% above London average

Elderly losing out in city with high levels of digital skills

98,000 not claiming their pension in a tale of two Londons

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 more boroughs will have a majority of BAME population in next 20 years

multi ethnic crowd bikeriderlondon shutterstock_150364787-1-2Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people will be in the majority in 12 of London’s 33 boroughs by 2036, according to population forecasts by the GLA.

Currently there is a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic majority in Newham, Brent, Tower Hamlets, Harrow, Ealing, Hounslow and Redbridge. By the end of the current decade there will be more BAME people than white people in Croydon, Barking and Dagenham, and Waltham Forest. By 2036 this will also be the case in Hillingdon and Lewisham.

BAME people are powering London’s population growth. Between the 2001 and 2011 census the population grew by 881,000. During the same period the white population fell by 300,000, despite the arrival of white EU migrants.

There are currently 8.6 million people living in London, 5 million of them are white. By 2041 the GLA expects their numbers to have risen by 10% to 5.5 million but the BAME population will grown by 36% from 3.6 to 4.9 million.

BAME White pop-2

The GLA forecasts that the biggest ethnic group will be from India. Black Africans overtook them at the time of the last census but they will become the biggest single group again by 2035, followed by Other Asians and Black Africans.

BAME trend-2

London will remain a city with a white majority population but the numbers vary in Inner and Outer areas. By 2041 BAME people will be 44% of the residents of inner boroughs and 49% of the population in outer areas.

Source data

See also

The Met fails to reflect the face of people it’s policing

Poles and Pakistanis help shape the multi-cultural make up of the city

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

As the Met faces cuts to officers, how many patrol your borough?

Police_sagar simkhada shutterstock_333009221-1

Photo: sagar simkhada ┃Shutterstock.com

How many police officers does it take to keep London safe? As the Metropolitan Police faces up to budget cuts that will see it forced to save around £800m in the next 4 years that is the question facing the Commissioner, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe.

In an interview with LBC he said: If we could keep at least 30,000 cops, I can make this city safe. If it’s below that, I start to get worried.” With the Commissioner already suggesting that cuts could mean losing 5,000 or more, it seems that he is going to get worried.

The latest data for September this year shows that the Met currently has 31,780 officers. Of those, 18,141 are allocated to what it calls Territorial Policing. That is the day-to-day local policing done at borough level. The largest number is in Westminster, the borough that covers much of central London with large numbers of visitors by day and revelers each night.

Police numbers

 

The rest are allocated to specialist units covering particular crimes like murder or gang violence, or particular operational areas like air support and mounted police.

The average ratio of officers in Territorial Policing to the population of the boroughs is 2.1 per 1,000 people. It is higher in some central areas, particularly Westminster.

Police numbers ratio pop

Looking at the number of officers in relation to what the Met has identified as priority crimes (violence, robbery, theft, burglary) shows a higher caseload for officers in some North London boroughs. In Brent and Islington there are 23 priority crimes per officer. South of the river in Lambeth and Southwark there are 18 and 19.

Haringey and Lewisham offer a good comparison. They have a similar number of officers and ratios of officers to population, but the rate of priority crimes per officer is 21 in Haringey and 17 in Lewisham.

Police numbers ratio crime

Following the terrorist attacks in Paris Sir Bernard said that he wants to increase the number of armed police in the Specialist Firearms Command above the current 2,000 level. If the cuts are to fall most heavily on Territorial Policing it may be the boroughs in North London that feel the greatest impact.

Source data

See also

The Met fails to reflect the face of people it’s policing

Police Taser some young and elderly, and firing is up steeply in some areas

Concern about knife crime but rise is small and level well below 2011

A prosperity divide and neither rich nor poor seem happy

© Acmanley | Dreamstime.com - London Street Art Photo

Photo: © Acmanley | Dreamstime.com

The people of Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea and Camden are among the wealthiest on average in the UK, but money is not buying them happiness, as they are more miserable than many across the country.

These findings emerge in an index that looks at the combination of wealth and life satisfaction to indicate levels of prosperity. It suggests that 6 London boroughs (Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London) are the most prosperous in the country. But 4 others (Bexley, Greenwich, Brent and Croydon) are in the bottom 10 of 170 areas assessed.

The high prosperity scores for London boroughs are based largely on wealth not well-being. The Legatum Institute, a think tank that says that it is focused on promoting prosperity, put the index together. It used GDP per capita as a measure of wealth and the life satisfaction data collected by the Office for National Statistics.

Residents in Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London, enjoy an average income of £133,000. 15 of the top 20 areas in the UK for average earnings, including Tower Hamlets, Hackney, Newham, Lambeth, Southwark, Lewisham, Haringey and Islington, are in London. But the spread of wealth is not uniform across the capital and some boroughs come at the lower end of the table. Redbridge, Waltham Forest, Enfield and Barking and Dagenham have average earnings of £14,300.

What is common to all London boroughs however is the low level of life satisfaction. The happiest place in the UK according the ONS measure is the Outer Hebrides. Out of 170 areas the only London borough to squeeze into the top 50 is Bromley at 49 in the rankings.

Wealthy Hammersmith and Fulham and Kensington and Chelsea are down in the mid 80s and only 6 other boroughs (Ealing, Merton, Sutton, Kingston, Richmond and Hounslow) make it into the top 100.

While residents of Camden and the City of London come top for earnings they are in the bottom 10 when it comes to happiness, along with Croydon and Brent. Haringey and Islington folk also seem to be miserable – 11th from bottom in the life satisfaction rankings.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Pay rates underline gap between rich and poor boroughs

Welcome to the city of the super rich

 

 

New workers stick together and head north of river as they settle in the capital

Larger numbers of new overseas workers coming to the capital are settling north of the river than south with Newham and Brent as the favourite destinations.

334,419 people from overseas registered for a National Insurance number, allowing them to work or claim benefits, in the financial year 2014/15. More than 50,000 are in Newham and Brent, but there are more than 10,000 in 13 of the 20 boroughs north of the river.

The City of London has the highest rate as a proportion of the working age population, but the numbers are small. Newham and Brent stand out clearly, and the top 10 are all north of the river areas.

NI top 10 boroughs

In contrast, 8 of the 10 boroughs with the lowest proportions are south of the river.

NI bottom 10 boroughsNew arrivals from Romania are driving the Newham and Brent numbers. Romanians were allowed free access to the UK labour market from the beginning of 2014. In the financial year 2014/15 nearly 67,000 have settled in London and registered for NI. That’s 20% of all registrations in London.

As our map shows, there are more than 8,000 in both Newham and Brent. That’s around a third of all new overseas NI registrations in each of those boroughs. As previously reported by Urbs, these are the areas that have the highest levels of Romanian born Londoners according to data from the last census in 2011.

NI Map Romanians-2

And it is not only Romanians who are choosing to join established national communities in London. Bulgarians, who also gained free movement to work in Britain in 2014, have predominantly settled in Haringey, Newham and Enfield. These are the three areas with the most Bulgarian-born Londoners according to the census.

Ni Map Bulgarians

The same story emerges for Poles. Ealing has more people from Poland than any other London borough according to the census data. It also has by far the most new NI registrations.

NI Map Poles

The group that bucks this trend is the Italians. 35,000 registered for NI in the past year, the biggest national group after Romanians. The census data shows that Italians living in London favour inner London boroughs with Westminster and Kensington and Chelsea as favourite. As our map shows, new arrivals are still living centrally but Tower Hamlets is the number one choice with Brent and Haringey also proving popular.

NI Map Italians

This shift in emphasis may be due to the changing nature and income level of a growing workforce seeking employment in London amid more difficult economic circumstances back home since the financial crisis.

Source data

See also

What National Insurance really tells us about London’s overseas workforce

The importance of the London factor in overseas worker numbers

London population maps

Mapping Londoners: Born in Nigeria

People born in Nigeria are the biggest group of black people by place of birth after those born in England. There are nearly 115,000 Nigerian-born Londoners, making them easily the largest African-born group, ahead of Somalis and Ghanaians. There are around 25,000 more Nigerian-born Londoners than Jamaican-born Londoners – the second largest black group by place of birth who were born outside England.

Southwark has the largest number of Nigerian-born people, followed by Greenwich and Lewisham. They are also the biggest non-English born group in Barking and Dagenham.

Born in Nigeria

Source data

More population maps

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa