Borough Profile: Kingston upon Thames

 People

Kingston upon Thames has a population of 173,853, that’s 2.0% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 37.0 years old, that’s 1.1 years older than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 19% of the population compared to 13% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 30% of the residents. 29% of the people living in Kingston upon Thames were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Sri Lanka and makes up 2% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from India. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Bulgaria and Poland.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £385,000.   Owner occupiers outnumber those who rent with 28% owning their home outright and a further 39% with a mortgage compared to 22% who rent privately and a further 11% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,675.

Crime

The crime rate in Kingston upon Thames is 59 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84 and is among the lowest in the capital.

The Area

Kingston upon Thames covers an area of 3,726 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 36% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Kingston upon Thames is above the national average with 74% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £40,000 and for women it is lower at £31,387.  The median income for a household in the borough is £56,920.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 54% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 6% have no qualifications and 4% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 70,421 cars in the borough, which equates to 1.1 cars per household.  Kingston upon Thames is rated as below average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 21.1% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Kingston upon Thames can expect to live until they are 82, for women life expectancy is 85 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 140.6 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 5% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 16% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.3 out of 10, which is above average for London.

See other borough profiles

Source Data

Might Brexit reverse a fall in new citizens?

The number of new Londoners taking their final step to British citizenship has fallen to its lowest level since 2004.

Figures from the Home Office show that in 2015 some 37,118 adults attended a formal citizenship ceremony where they took an oath or affirmation of allegiance and received their certificate of citizenship.  This is the lowest number since the ceremonies were first introduced in 2004 as the final and compulsory stage of the citizenship process.

Once a citizenship application is granted the Home Office sends out an invitation letter and an individual must attend a ceremony within three months.

The number attending in London has fallen by more than 7,000 on 2014 and is down by 43% from a highpoint in 2009, when more than 65,000 people attended ceremonies.

The ceremonies are organised by local authorities and were introduced by the government to foster the idea that gaining citizenship was an event to be celebrated rather than simply a bureaucratic process.  Other countries including the USA, Canada and Australia do the same.

The first ever ceremony was carried out in Brent.  Last year 1,885 people attended events there, the highest number in London, closely followed by Newham and Hounslow.

The lowest number of new citizens proclaiming their allegiance to Queen and country were in the boroughs of Richmond, Kingston and Bexley. The small resident population of the City of London welcomed 17 new members to its community in 2015.

Citizenship London Map-2

The fall in London is reflected across the country.  The number of citizenship ceremonies peaked nationally in 2013 but have fallen back in the past two years

Citizenship since 2004

London retains its position for welcoming the bulk of new Britons.  Since 2004 around half of the ceremonies for the whole country took place in the capital.  Last year it was 45% and 16 of the London boroughs each had more ceremonies than the whole of Wales.

Citizenship regional

The latest data from the Home Office for the number of applications granted, the stage ahead of the final ceremony, show that numbers may be going up.  The national figures for the 12 months up to the end of June, which includes the period running up to the Brexit referendum, show that 40,000 more people gained British citizenship than in the 12 months to June 2015.

The figures do not show what impact this upturn has on London, but given the large proportion of applicants who make their home in the capital the numbers suggest that 2016 will see a rising number of ceremonies and new citizens after the drop in 2015.

Source data

See also

Our multi-lingual city – English second language for half of primary pupils

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

London’s unique language landscape where 26% don’t speak English at home

A tenth of Londoners won’t get a vote but may feel the impact of the EU referendum

 

Kingston’s diabetes record is the best in the country

Kingston has the lowest rate of diabetes in London and for the whole of England. But in the next 20 years there will be an additional 4,018 sufferers in the borough, according to Public Health England, placing pressure on health services.

There are currently 9,440 people with diabetes in the area, up by 218 on last year. Just 6.7% of all the people living in Kingston have the condition, which is well below the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have crept up to 6.8% and in 2035 will reach 7.6%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, 1.5% of them will live in Kingston.

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

 

 

Growth of preventable cases of diabetes threaten the health service

Obese copy

The number of people in London suffering from diabetes will rocket by 40% over the next 20 years, according to forecasts from Public Health England.

Its figures show that in 2016 there are 638,000 people over 16 with diabetes. But rising rates coupled with a growing population means that this will go up by more than a quarter of million to 895,000 by 2035.

PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

John Newton of Public Health England said: “Developing diabetes in not an inevitable part of ageing.  We have the opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS.”

The PHE forecasts reveals a wide discrepancy in rates across the capital.  Brent has the highest rate of diabetes not only in London but in England with 11.5% of people with the condition today.  Kingston has the lowest rate in England at 6.7%.

The highest rates after Brent are in Harrow, Redbridge and Ealing. The lowest, apart from  Kingston, are in Richmond, Wandsworth and Islington.

Diabetes rate 2016

Both Brent and Kingston will retain their positions as the boroughs with the highest and lowest rates in England by 2035.  The rate in Brent will climb to 13.6% of the population.

The record in Ealing, Harrow and Redbridge will remain poor and Newham will be second only to Brent with a rate of 12.7%.

Kingston’s rate will rise to 7.6%, with neighbouring Richmond, plus Wandsworth and Islington remaining among the areas with lowest rates.

Diabetes 2035

The data shows a worsening situation throughout London over the next two decades.  Today there are seven boroughs where the prevalence of diabetes in the population is above 10%. By 2035 the rate is forecast to be one in ten or higher in 17 areas.

The biggest change in the rate of the condition between 2016 and 2035 is forecast to be in Tower Hamlets where the rate will go up by 24%.  The borough is also expected to see the biggest growth in population in the coming decades, as reported by Urbs. The combination of these factors will place severe pressure on local health services.

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

See also

Sportiest Londoners live in the wealthier south west boroughs

How the obesity rate doubled for the class of 2007

Size matters – and it depends where you live

 

Smoking on the rise in six boroughs but the city is stubbing out the habit

Smoking-2Against the general trend of both the city and the country, smoking has increased in six boroughs since 2012.

The latest data gathered by the Office for National Statistics through its large-scale Annual Population Survey reveals that the rate of smoking in 2015 compared to 2012 was up in Harrow, Haringey, Kensington and Chelsea, Kingston, Newham and Tower Hamlets.

The biggest increase, of nearly 14%, was in Harrow, but the overall level of smoking remains low in the borough. Haringey, Newham and Tower Hamlets experienced an increase on rates that are among the highest in London.

smoking change 12-15-2

Although the increases are mostly small they are significant in the context of falling rates across the rest of the capital.  The average rate for London has gone down from 18.2% who said they were smokers in 2012 to 16.3% in 2015.  In Redbridge the rate fell by more than 30% over that period, according to the ONS figures. There were also steep declines in Brent and Bromley.

The data does not reveal the reason behind these changes.  It may be the consequence of changing habits or changes in the make up of the population in areas. It may be due to people aswering questions more honestly, as the survey relies on individuals to define themselves as smokers.

The rate of smoking in London is among the lowest for any region in England.  Across England 16.9% of people say that they are smokers. The rate is lower than that in 20 London boroughs.  The lowest rate in London is 11.5% in Redbridge, but it is nearly double that in Haringey where 22% of people said they smoked in 2015.  In five boroughs – Haringey, Lambeth, Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham –  two or more in every ten people smoke.

Smoking rates-2

Apart from Redbridge, Richmond, Brent and Bromley all have a rate of smoking at around 12% or lower.

There are a number of measures of smoking carried out across the country.  A survey at GP surgeries of people over 15 carried out over two year periods found the level of smoking in London fractionally higher in 2014/15 than the most recent ONS data, It also recorded small rises in a handful of boroughs.

Source data

See Also

Police taking a relaxed approach to ban on smoking in cars

Low birth weight babies in Tower Hamlets 60% above London average

Teenage survey finds that Richmond has highest level of cannabis use

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Falling numbers for free school meals but rates still among highest in country

children legsThe number of pupils claiming free school meals is continuing to fall in London. However, there is a greater proportion of children in nursery, primary and secondary schools claiming free lunches here than in many other parts of the country.

New data from the Department of Education shows that nearly 17% of London pupils are receiving free school meals in nurseries and primaries – more than two percentage points higher than the average in England.

Only the North East and West Midlands regions have a higher proportion of youngsters on the free meal scheme.  In Tower Hamlets and Hackney more than a third of under 11s are receiving free meals. The Merseyside borough of Knowsley is the only local authority with a higher rate.

In Southwark, a fifth of children are claiming free meals, a slight increase on last year.  But the numbers are down in Lewisham and Westminster, and the largest decrease took place in Islington where 29% of pupils are claiming school meal benefits, down from 38% last year, but still the third highest rate in the capital.

Free school meals primary

The trend is similar among secondary school pupils. On average, 13% of children over 11 are on the free meal scheme across England. The rate is similar in Outer London but significantly higher within inner London, with more than 40% in Tower Hamlets and 30% in Hackney and Islington. In Camden and Lambeth it is around a quarter of secondary school children.

Free school meals secondary-2

London varies hugely with outer areas pushing the capital average down.  Boroughs in the South West score as low or lower than many other parts of the country, with both Kingston upon Thames and Richmond upon Thames averaging less than 9% for students below the age of 16 claiming free school meals.

Free school meals are available to children from families who are claiming other types of benefit for unemployment or low income.  In 2013 the government extended the scheme so that all children in reception, year 1 and year 2 at state primary schools, ie all children under 8, receive free meals.  From year 3 onwards families must register and make a claim.

Entitlement to free school meals is commonly used as an indicator for children living in poverty. But many who are entitled to the benefit do not claim, a reluctance sometimes attached to social stigma. In London this year 215,000 children are judged to be eligible but only 180,000 are receiving free meals.

Source data

See also

105,000 extra secondary pupils pose huge challenge for capital’s schools

85% of children in private school in one area of West London

Schools data reveals ethnic mix with fall in proportion of white British pupils

 

Teens saying no to booze, but Richmond tops list for 15-year-olds getting drunk

Drinking alcoholThe soberest 15-year-olds in the country appear to be living in London, with the exception perhaps of the teenagers of Richmond.

A national survey of attitudes and habits of 15-year-olds found that 59% in London say that they have never touched alcohol, the lowest level for any region in England and Wales.

Of those that have drunk alcohol, nearly two thirds say that they are do not drink currently while in the South West of England, the same proportion say they do.

The What About YOUth survey commissioned by the Department of Health reveals that drinking habits are influenced by cultural and ethnic factors and by deprivation levels.

This can be seen in a borough by borough break down of the survey that received responses from around 120,000 teenagers.

When asked if they had ever taken an alcoholic drink just 15% in Tower Hamlets, 20% in Newham and 25% in Brent said yes.  Both boroughs have high levels of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic teenagers in the population, who were found to drink less than white youngsters.  Many Muslims live in these boroughs and drinking alcohol is forbidden by their faith.

Drinking levels were higher in outer London boroughs (including Redbridge, Havering, Bexley, Bromley, Sutton and Kingston), than inner ones and the highest proportion of 15-year-olds who have consumed alcohol was in Richmond.

Teens had a drink

Richmond also has the highest proportion in England and Wales of 15-year-olds who say that they have been drunk in the past month.  38% of those who say that they have tried alcohol say that they have been drunk in the previous 4 weeks.

Teens drunks

The proportion in Richmond is substantially higher than most other London boroughs. Haringey was the only other borough where the rate was above 30%.

Source data

See also

Kensington teenage girls have the most negative body image in England

London losing its thirst for binge drinking

London teen pregnancy rate lowest but more end in abortion

 

More mums in their early 40s than early 20s in city’s wealthiest areas

Pregnant at work g-stockstudio-2

Photo: g-stockstudio ┃Shuttertock.com

Women giving birth in their early 40s outnumber women giving birth in their early 20s in 8 of London’s most affluent boroughs. In Kensington and Chelsea the ratio is 2:1 in favour of the older mums.

The figures in the latest births data from the Office for National Statistics underlines the long-running trend towards women having children when they are older. Nationally the number of mums in the 35-39 age group exceeded those aged 20-24 for the first time last year, according to the data just released.

But in London that trend is more developed and the numbers of women in their 40s giving birth is growing. Across England and Wales just under half of all births are to women in their 20s. In London it is 38% as more women wait before having children.

London v national birth ages

London mums have an older age profile. The data show that 18% of all the children born in the England and Wales in 2014 were born in London. But only 9% of those born to under 20s were in the capital, while it is home to a quarter of mothers over 35 and more than a third of those over 45.

Across England and Wales as a whole the picture is different and the number of mothers in their early 20s outnumbers those in their 40s by 4:1.  This is the case in some London boroughs too, such as Newham and Barking and Dagenham. But in Richmond, and Kensington and Chelsea the 40-44s have outnumbered the 20-24s for some years and this trend is now emerging in more boroughs, including Camden, City of London, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kingston, Wandsworth and Westminster.

20s v 40s

The affluent nature of these boroughs suggests that professional women trying to balance career with the timing of children may be a key driver of this trend.

Source data

See also

Baby booming Wandsworth is the city’s kiddie capital

Over 50% of London babies have mothers born outside the UK

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

 

Thousands reoffend while on probation but rates are declining

Prison sign StockCube.shutterstock_62859043-1

Photo: StockCube ┃Shutterstock.com

Thousands of offenders who are being supervised by the probation service commit further crimes within 3 months. But the rate of reoffending by those on probation is going down in London. The city has the second lowest rate of reoffending in England and Wales for offenders who are being monitored by the Probation Service.

The latest figures from the Ministry of Justice show that during 2013 the Probation Service across London had a caseload of 92,607. These were offenders under supervision orders – either issued by a court or following their release from prison on license. Out of this caseload, 8.1% reoffended.

At regional level London has the second lowest reoffending rate in England and Wales. Only the West Midlands is lower.

Reoffending regional chart-2

London has had reoffending rates consistently lower than predicted since 2010.

Within London, Hammersmith and Fulham has the worst record with 12.9% committing a further offence while under probation supervision. Kingston, Kensington and Chelsea and Tower Hamlets have rates approaching 10%.

Southwark, Greenwich and Bromley had much better results during 2013. The reoffending rate in Bromley was below 7% while Southwark and Greenwich have rates that have been consistently lower than predicted.

Reoffending map

While these figures indicate some success for the Probation Service they do not show the full picture on reoffending. The data does not include youth crime or offenders over 22 who have been released from a custodial sentence of less than a year, as they do not receive probation supervision.

The broader data on reoffending from the Ministry of Justice shows that the rate for all adult and juveniles, not just those under probation supervision, was 26.5% in England and Wales in 2013, and this rate has been fairly stable since 2003.

The age group with the highest rate of reoffending is those under 14 where 38% commit a further offence within 12 months. People convicted of theft are most likely to reoffend – 43% commit a further crime with 12 months.

Source data

See also

Concern about knife crime but rise is small and level well below 2011

Crime down nearly a third in 5 years on buses, Tube and trains

Crime map shows inner-outer divide

Thousands of children sent to hospital because of tooth decay

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Photo: Dimijana ┃Shutterstock.com

Thousands of children, most of them under 10, are having teeth extracted in hospital because of decay. It is the most common reason for children between 5 and 9 to be admitted to hospital.

While many extractions take place in a dental surgery more difficult cases or ones where multiple teeth need to be removed are often referred to hospital. This is more common in younger children where a general anesthetic may be needed to perform the procedure.

London has one of the poorest records in England. Data gathered from dental hospitals for each local authority across the country for 2013-14 shows that 0.7% of under 19s in the capital were admitted to have a tooth or multiple teeth removed due to decay. That’s 13,787 children and teenagers. The figures do not include surgery on impacted wisdom teeth, often treated in hospital, which affects those over 18.

Improvements in dentistry and people’s care of their teeth mean that extractions are far less common than in the past but they are the only solution if a tooth cannot be repaired by a filling or a root canal.

The record in London is much worse that elsewhere in the South of England. In the South East region it is just 0.3% of children. Only Yorkshire and Humberside has a higher rate than London.

tooth exraction children chart

Rates are markedly higher in some parts of the capital – indicated by the darker area on the map. In Hammersmith and Fulham 1.2% of children ended up in hospital for an extraction. In neighbouring Richmond it is just 0.4%.

tooth extraction children map

The leading cause of tooth decay is frequent exposure to sugary drinks and snacks. Poor dental hygiene and failure to use fluoride toothpaste are also to blame. But Public Health England says that there is a correlation between levels of dental decay and levels of deprivation.

Its survey of levels of tooth decay in under 5s, published in 2013, showed that as with the figures on extractions, London had one of the poorest records, along with Yorkshire, Humberside and the North West.

33% of under 5s in London were found to have dental decay compared to a national average of 27%. But in Brent and Tower Hamlets the rate was 46% while in Kingston and Richmond it was below 20%.

The survey showed that the rate of dental decay had improved since the previous study in 2008 in every region except London.

Dental decay remains a significant public health problem and the NHS recommends that all children should have a dental check up once a year to prevent serious cases of decay going untreated and leading to extractions.

Data on tooth extractions

Hospital admission statistic

See also

Childhood obesity highest in London

1 in 3 kids growing up in out-of-work households in parts of London

Baby booming Wandsworth is the city’s kiddie capital