Low drug-related death rates hide middle-aged heroin problem

heroinLondon has the lowest rate of deaths caused by drug abuse for any region of England and Wales. Last year 226 people in the capital died as a result of taking drugs. Most of them were men and most of them were the result of an unintentional overdose.

In the early 90s London had the worst record in the country for drug related deaths. The number of people killed reached a peak at the end of the 90s.

Drugs death london

During that period rates in other regions of the country began to rise, particularly in the North West of England. In the 2000’s the rate in London began to fall gently and since 2011 London has had the lowest mortality rate. Last year there were 25.4 deaths per million people in the capital. In the North West of England the rate is over 60 per million and in the North East nearly 70. The North East has seen the biggest increase over 20 years. In 1993 its mortality rate for drug misuse was just 14 per million.

drugs national

The data is based on registered deaths where drug misuse is defined as the cause of death. The data is collected by the ONS. The national figures give some surprising insights into the demographics of drug abuse.

The group with the highest death rate through drug misuse are not young people, as might be assumed, but people 40-49. The number of heroin and morphine related deaths in this group for 2014 is the highest on record. People aged 30-39 have the second highest death rate. People in their 20s have a lower mortality for drug misuse than those in their 50s and 60s.

Drugs deaths age

Men are 2.5 times more likely than women to die from drug misuse. 79% of the male deaths were unintentional. The rate for women is slightly lower at 69% and women show a greater level of intentional self-harm.

The national data also shows a substantial increase in the number of deaths caused by heroin and morphine which have risen by two thirds between 2012 and 2014. Deaths caused by cocaine use have also increased.

The detailed data at local authority level is grouped in batches of 3 years. The picture for London for 2012-14 shows that the highest deaths rates are in Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea and Islington. The lowest rates are in the outer boroughs of Merton, Hillingdon and Enfield.

Drugs death map

 

Source data

See also

Violence, disruption and drugs – why 20,000 pupils were excluded from school last year

Anxious, unhappy, dissatisfied with life? Perhaps you live in Hackney or Barking?

despair

How happy are you? Did you feel anxious yesterday? Are you satisfied with life, and does your life feel worthwhile? These are the questions the Office for National Statistics has been asking since 2010 to try to understand the nation’s well-being.

The most recent rankings show that people in Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea are most pleased with their lot in life while those in Barking and Dagenham, Hackney and Lambeth seem to have little to smile about.

The results are based upon a national survey carried out by the ONS that questions around 120,000 people nationally and over 13,000 in London. The responses indicate a greater sense of well-being in south and west London, in line with the GLA’s own well-being index, previously reported by Urbs.

When it comes to satisfaction with life the small resident population of the City of London came out top, closely followed by Kensington. At the other end of the scale the survey respondents in Barking and Dagenham and Lambeth were least satisfied.

ONS Well-being Survey
How satisfied are you with your life?
Most Satisfied Least satisfied
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
Richmond Camden
Southwark Hackney
Merton Greenwich

There was a similar result at the top and bottom of the rankings when it came to whether life felt worthwhile.

ONS Well-being Survey
To what extent do you feel the things you do in your life are worthwhile?
Worthwhile Not worthwhile
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Hillingdon Hackney
Bexley Camden
Richmond Brent

In terms of happiness the affluent areas of Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea score well once more, and Bromley on the southern outer edge of the capital also has happy residents. Hackney and Barking and Dagenham feature again but at the wrong end of the rankings.

ONS Well-being Survey
How happy did you feel yesterday?
Most happy Least happy
Kensington and Chelsea Hackney
Bromley Barking and Dagenham
Richmond Hammersmith and Fulham
Barnet Waltham Forest
Hounslow Westminster

As well as being unhappy the survey respondents in Hackney and Barking and Dagenham were also the most anxious people in the capital. As their boroughs feature in the bottom 5 in all 4 categories perhaps that’s not surprising.

ONS Well-being Survey
How anxious did you feel yesterday?
Least anxious Most anxious
Enfield Hackney
Barnet Barking and Dagenham
Harrow Lambeth
Newham Southwark
Hillingdon Islington

The least anxious were not in the affluent areas that scored well in other categories but in the North London boroughs of Enfield, Barnet and Harrow.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Are you a north of the river or south of the river Londoner?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over 50% of London babies have mothers born outside the UK

Baby hand

More than half the babies in London last year were born to mothers who were from outside the UK. Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that 58% of new Londoners had mothers who were born outside the UK.  That’s more than double the national rate as across the country non-UK mums account for 27% of births.

In 3 boroughs, Newham, Westminster and Brent, three quarters of the births were to mothers from outside the UK. Since 2004 Newham has had the highest rate in the country for births by women born overseas. Last year it was 76.4%.

The boroughs with the lowest rates of births to mothers born overseas are Havering, Bromley and Bexley. With 28% non UK-born mothers Havering comes closest to the national average.

Mothers born outside UK

National data shows that Poland, Pakistan and India are the most common countries of birth for mothers who are not UK-born. The Polish-born population of the UK has increased 10-fold in the past 10 years.

Of the 127,000 babies born in London in 2014, 25,000 had mothers born in Asia or the Middle East, 20,000 had mothers born in the EU, the majority in newer EU members, which includes Poland, and nearly 17,000 had mothers from Africa.

Across London the most common region of birth for mothers from outside the UK varies from borough to borough. In 6 of the 14 inner London boroughs, including Haringey and Islington, it is the EU. In 10 of the 19 outer London boroughs, including Hillingdon, Harrow, Redbridge and Sutton, it is Asia and the Middle East. For 8 boroughs, including Lewisham, Southwark and Barking and Dagenham, it is Africa.

Source data

See also

Muhammad and Amelia top London’s baby name charts, again

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

Our multi-lingual city – English second language for half of primary pupils

Renting in London: 4 bedroom homes

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, as its name suggests, has a number of esteemed residents living in larger properties. The area has streets of fine Georgian terraces and median rental on larger properties is the highest in London, and the highest in the UK at more than £9,000 a month.

Westminster is the second most expensive at £7,800, but these two boroughs are far removed from the rest of the market.

Rental 4 bed map

The wealthy West London boroughs of Richmond and Hammersmith and Fulham are in the next price tier along with Camden and Islington.

Central areas such as Tower Hamlets, which has expensive smaller housing stock through the development of areas like Canary Wharf and Limehouse, is cheaper for this size of property and in line with outlying boroughs such as Merton and Barnet.

Sutton and Bromley are noticeable more expensive than the boroughs in the east of the capital, while their prices have been more in line for smaller properties.

For bigger properties the gap between London and non-London prices is smaller than the premiums for 1,2 or 3 bedroom properties – it is only twice as expensive.

Rental 4 bed

Source data

More on Renting in London

 

 

 

 

Renting in London: 2 bedroom homes

The additional cost of living in London really begins to show in 2 bedroom homes. For families who need more than a single bedroom the median price in London is £1,400, that’s 135% above the median price for England.

Rental 2 Bed

Data from the Valuation Office Agency, the body that advises the government on property values, shows the highest prices in the capital are in Kensington and Chelsea, and Westminster, with the City close behind.

Camden and Islington are in the tier below with median rental around £1,900 a month followed by the ring of inner boroughs and Haringey.

Rental 2 bed map

As with smaller properties, median prices are lowest on the south and east edges of the capital.

Source data

More on Renting in London

 

Religious Faith in London: Non-believers

As previously reported by Urbs, London is the most religious region of Britain with three quarters of the population describing themselves as having a religious faith.

The biggest changes over the past decade have been the decline in Christianity to below 50% and the rise in non-believers. In 2006 16% said they had no religious faith. In 2014 that had climbed to 25%.

Non-believers are spread across the capital. The highest proportion is in Islington, but lack of religious belief is above 30% in most central boroughs.

Newham in the east has the fewest non-believers. The borough has one of the largest Muslim populations in the capital and a high proportion of Christians.

Religion no belief-2

Source data

See also

Religious Faith in London: Christians

Religious Faith in London: Muslims

Religious Faith in London: Hindus

Religious Faith in London: Jews

Religious Faith in London: Sikhs

Religious Faith in London: Buddhists

 

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

Baby handThe number of children born in London fell marginally last year to 127,399, a reduction of 0.7% on 2013.

Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that the birth rate has fallen for a second year. The ONS uses a measure called GRF (general rate of fertility) to measure the number of births per 1,000 women in the 15-44 age group. The rate for the whole of London is 63.3, a little above the average for England of 62.2 and the third highest in the country.

births natonally

But the overall rate hides a large variation across the city. The birth rate in the inner London boroughs is 56.5, and the differences become starker when looked at on a borough-by-borough level.

London has a central core of 4 boroughs where the birth rate is much lower. In the City of London, Camden, Westminster and Islington rates are below 50 per 1000 women. But in several outer boroughs, notably Barking & Dagenham and Newham the rate is over 75. Barking & Dagenham has the 4th highest GFR in England.

births london

The proportion of births to mothers born outside the UK went up slightly to 27% nationally in 2014. This has increased every year since 1990 and has a particular impact in London where there is a large overseas-born population.

Source data

See also

London drives UK population growth

Younger workforce makes capital’s population pensioner poor

Booming population will struggle to find a place to live

More homes packed into built up inner city as growth stalls in outer areas

crowded block of flatsLondon’s population continues to grow but housing development to provide people with a place to live has become increasingly focused on central areas in the past 15 years.

Data from the Department for Communities and Local Government shows that the growth in the number of homes this century has been 10% across England and 11% across London as a whole. But the figure for London disguises a stark difference between inner and outer boroughs. There has been a 37% increase in the number of homes in Tower Hamlets since 2001 and a 20% increase in Islington. But in the same period the growth rate in dwellings in 16 outer boroughs has been in single figures.

Housing growth

This pattern of growth is a reversal of what happened through most of the 20th century when more than half of the new housing stock was provided in the outer boroughs.

The consequence is that built-up areas of inner London are becoming more densely packed. Housing density is measured in dwellings per hectare. The average for England as a whole is 1.8. The average rate for London is 21.5. For Inner London it is more than double that again at 44.6. And for Kensington and Chelsea, the borough with London’s highest, it is 69.1.

As the map shows, Kensington and Chelsea has seen just 2% growth in homes sine 2001 due to a lack of brownfield sites. The fastest growing borough in terms of housing, Tower Hamlets, has seen dwelling density rise from 37.2 homes per hectare in 2001 to over 50 today.

In comparison, the dwellings per hectare rate in Havering is 8.7, in Hillingdon it is 9.1, and in Bromley 9.2. If Havering had the same level of housing density as Kensington and Chelsea it would have 800,000 homes, not 100,000.

Source data

See also:

Booming population will struggle to find a place to live

Crowded London’s most crowded place is Islington

 

 

Where 22,000 cars were stolen in the capital last year

dreamstime_s_27170312Wandsworth is the car crime capital coming top of the list of the 32 boroughs where a total of 22,000 cars were stolen last year.  Wandsworth wins the accolade only narrowly as car theft is spread quite evenly across the city and only 5 boroughs have fewer than 500 cars stolen. In comparison, cycle theft is far more focused on central areas, perhaps reflecting  a higher number of inner city cyclists and where commuters leave their bikes for the day.

Data from the Metropolitan Police for the 12 months to March 2015 shows that car theft went up by 8% on the previous 12 months. 1,052 cars were taken in Wandsworth, and Newham was just 5 cars behind. But, as our map shows, the pattern of theft was quite evenly spread with a few more dark areas in the east than west.

Car theft

Lowest levels were in the south west but the safest place to park a car was Harrow, with just 195 taken in the period.

Bike theft is focused on the centre of the city. 17,300 cycles were stolen in the 12 months to March 2015, a fall of 7%.  Westminster was the most likely place to lose you bike, with 1,296 taken followed by Hackney with 1,282 stolen cycles. These 2 boroughs, plus Camden, Islington, Tower Hamlets, Southwark and Lambeth form a central ring that accounted for nearly half the cycle thefts.

Bike theft

After these areas the most worrying place to park your bike in a rack were the western boroughs of Wandsworth, Kensington and Chelsea, and Hammersmith and Fulham.

The outlying boroughs of Havering and Bexley saw the lowest bike theft figures.

Source data

See also:

Tourists biggest users of Boris Bikes

Traffic constant, profits up – a congestion charge story

Crime Report: Islington

Islington has the 4th highest crime rate of the 32 London boroughs. Data from the Metropolitan Police shows that there were 26,100 crimes committed in the year to March 2015, giving the borough a rate of 116 crimes per 1000 residents. That is 43% higher than the London average of 81

Crime is higher in all major categories. There were 12,000 theft offences and 1,000 robberies. That’s  65% or more than the London average. Within the theft category 1,132 cycles stolen. That is 153% above the city-wide level.

Crime Report Islington

Islington is one of 4 north London boroughs that saw 5 murders committed in the period. Rape offences were 9% above the average and there was a significant problem with harassment with 2,384 offences recorded.

Source data

More crime reports