5 more boroughs will have a majority of BAME population in next 20 years

multi ethnic crowd bikeriderlondon shutterstock_150364787-1-2Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people will be in the majority in 12 of London’s 33 boroughs by 2036, according to population forecasts by the GLA.

Currently there is a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic majority in Newham, Brent, Tower Hamlets, Harrow, Ealing, Hounslow and Redbridge. By the end of the current decade there will be more BAME people than white people in Croydon, Barking and Dagenham, and Waltham Forest. By 2036 this will also be the case in Hillingdon and Lewisham.

BAME people are powering London’s population growth. Between the 2001 and 2011 census the population grew by 881,000. During the same period the white population fell by 300,000, despite the arrival of white EU migrants.

There are currently 8.6 million people living in London, 5 million of them are white. By 2041 the GLA expects their numbers to have risen by 10% to 5.5 million but the BAME population will grown by 36% from 3.6 to 4.9 million.

BAME White pop-2

The GLA forecasts that the biggest ethnic group will be from India. Black Africans overtook them at the time of the last census but they will become the biggest single group again by 2035, followed by Other Asians and Black Africans.

BAME trend-2

London will remain a city with a white majority population but the numbers vary in Inner and Outer areas. By 2041 BAME people will be 44% of the residents of inner boroughs and 49% of the population in outer areas.

Source data

See also

The Met fails to reflect the face of people it’s policing

Poles and Pakistanis help shape the multi-cultural make up of the city

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

Drug resistant TB poses health and financial concern

Mycobacterium_tuberculosis_Bacteria,_the_Cause_of_TB_By NIAID [CC BY 2.0 (http-//creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons 2.

Photo: by NIAID CC BY 2.0

London faces a potential health care and treatment funding crisis caused by the development of drug resistant TB.

There were 2,500 cases of tuberculosis in London last year, that’s more than any other western European city. 9% of those cases were resistant to the first line of antibiotics used to fight the infection. And the Health Committee of the London Assembly warns that drug resistance is set to rise.

In its report Tackling TB in London the Health Committee highlights how the risk from TB is increased by the lack of knowledge and the social stigma attached to the disease and it calls on the Mayor to do more to raise awareness.

It also suggests a more unified and consistent approach to treating the infection across the capital. Currently, treatment and prevention is handled at a local level and the approach varies between the 30 clinics. The committee warns that this can lead to a fragmented approach. This is underlined by the fact that only 24 of the 32 boroughs offer universal vaccination against TB to babies.

Cases of TB have risen by 50% in the last 15 years. A third of boroughs have what is classified by the World Health Organisation as a high incidence – that is more than 40 cases per 100,000 people. But in some areas of Newham, Brent, Hounslow, Harrow and Ealing it is over 150, a higher level than many developing world counties such as Rwanda or Iraq.

At borough level, Newham has the highest incidence in London and England, followed by Brent. London accounts for 40% of all TB cases in England.

TB map

TB is caused by bacteria and spread through coughing and sneezing. It most commonly affects the lungs, causing serious illness, and is potentially fatal.

It is treated by a 6-month course of antibiotics that costs around £5,000. Last year £30 million was spent tackling TB in London. Drug resistant strains of the infection require complex treatments often involving hospital care and costs are typically 10 times higher or more.

TB is closely linked to social deprivation with those who are homeless, living in overcrowded conditions, misusing drugs and alcohol, or with weakened immune systems particularly vulnerable.

Many people who are exposed to the tuberculosis bacterium will fight it off or may carry it in their bodies without getting sick. This is known as latent TB.

More than 80% of the cases in London are seen in people born outside the UK, though only a small proportion in those who have recently arrived. The most common countries of origin for non-UK born cases are India, Pakistan and Somalia.

Sufferers may have contracted TB in countries with high incidence and carried the infection in latent form only for it to become active while living in London.   Chronic illness or poor housing and nutrition may have acted as a trigger in these cases.

The rate for non-UK born cases has fallen in recent years but those for UK residents have remained unchanged.

The Health Committee reports says that far from being a disease of London’s past TB continues to present a significant public health challenge.

Source data

Tackling TB in London report

Borough level data

See also

Low drug-related death rates hide middle-aged heroin problem

Sexual infection map shows problems for Lambeth and Southwark

Health and wealth – an East/West divide when it comes to a flu jab

 

North and East see growth in number of businesses

house plans 2Business growth across London has been more successful in the north and east of the capital in the past 6 years than the south and west.

The number of businesses has contracted in some central areas and fallen by 32% in the City. Data from the Office for National Statistics shows the largest growth in the number of individual business units between 2009-2015 was in Camden and Lambeth.

But a crescent of boroughs from Harrow in the north to Greenwich in the south east have seen growth above 20% since 2009 and in a number, including Newham and Redbridge, it is over 30%. At the same time there has been just single digit growth on the opposite side of the city.

Business unit growth

The data shows that there are currently 461,020 businesses in London. It’s the largest number of any UK region and the equivalent of the combined number for North West England, Yorkshire and Humberside.

More that 10% of businesses are in Westminster, and it has 10 times more than Barking and Dagenham, which has the fewest with 5,865.

Business unit numbers 2

The largest sector in terms of numbers of businesses in the capital is Professional, Scientific and Technical services, as it is in the UK as a whole. In London this accounts for 24% of all business. In the City of London this sector is 40% of all business units.

Information and Communication services is London’s second biggest sector with 13% of all businesses. Business administration and support, and construction are third and fourth. Across the country, construction is the second biggest industry sector in terms of numbers of businesses and retail makes up a higher proportion of businesses than in does in London.

Source data

Jobs forecast shows Tower Hamlets as engine of employment growth

Jobs concentrated in just 5 of London’s 33 boroughs

Shrinking public sector employment outdone by private sector jobs growth

 

 

 

Suicide rate lowest in 20 years and lowest in England and Wales

homeless 2London has the lowest rate of suicide of any region of England and Wales but the figures are far from even across the capital and some boroughs have rates that are above the national average.

The latest data available from the Office for National Statistics shows that in 2013 516 Londoners over the age of 15 killed themselves. That is a rate of 7.9 per 100,000 people. This is the lowest rate in the capital in the past 20 years. The highest rate in England is in the North East, and in Wales the rate is double that of London.

Suicide regional rates

The national figures reveal that 3 times more men than women commit suicide. The majority of men killed themselves through suffocation. This is also the most common method among women, but women are more likely than men to poison or drown themselves.

An age breakdown into groups of 5 years shows that people aged 45-49 have the highest rate of suicide. It is rare in those under 20 but climbs steadily up to the 45-49 age group.  Rates drop significantly at retirement age of 65 and only rise again in those over 80.

Because the actual numbers are small we have looked at averages over the past 3 years of data to examine rates at borough level. While the City of London has by far the highest rate the actual numbers are so small given the low population of the area that comparison of rates is not reliable.

In the 32 boroughs, Westminster has the highest rate at 12 per 100,000 people followed by Hammersmith and Fulham with 11.5. These proportions exceed the rate for England for the same period of 10.4 per 100,000 residents. The lowest rates are in Harrow, Greenwich and Newham.

Suicide london map

 

Source data

See also

Low drug-related deaths rates hide middle-aged heroin problem

Low ranking on infant deaths puts London behind other cities

For help and more information: Samaritans

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anxious, unhappy, dissatisfied with life? Perhaps you live in Hackney or Barking?

despair

How happy are you? Did you feel anxious yesterday? Are you satisfied with life, and does your life feel worthwhile? These are the questions the Office for National Statistics has been asking since 2010 to try to understand the nation’s well-being.

The most recent rankings show that people in Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea are most pleased with their lot in life while those in Barking and Dagenham, Hackney and Lambeth seem to have little to smile about.

The results are based upon a national survey carried out by the ONS that questions around 120,000 people nationally and over 13,000 in London. The responses indicate a greater sense of well-being in south and west London, in line with the GLA’s own well-being index, previously reported by Urbs.

When it comes to satisfaction with life the small resident population of the City of London came out top, closely followed by Kensington. At the other end of the scale the survey respondents in Barking and Dagenham and Lambeth were least satisfied.

ONS Well-being Survey
How satisfied are you with your life?
Most Satisfied Least satisfied
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
Richmond Camden
Southwark Hackney
Merton Greenwich

There was a similar result at the top and bottom of the rankings when it came to whether life felt worthwhile.

ONS Well-being Survey
To what extent do you feel the things you do in your life are worthwhile?
Worthwhile Not worthwhile
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Hillingdon Hackney
Bexley Camden
Richmond Brent

In terms of happiness the affluent areas of Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea score well once more, and Bromley on the southern outer edge of the capital also has happy residents. Hackney and Barking and Dagenham feature again but at the wrong end of the rankings.

ONS Well-being Survey
How happy did you feel yesterday?
Most happy Least happy
Kensington and Chelsea Hackney
Bromley Barking and Dagenham
Richmond Hammersmith and Fulham
Barnet Waltham Forest
Hounslow Westminster

As well as being unhappy the survey respondents in Hackney and Barking and Dagenham were also the most anxious people in the capital. As their boroughs feature in the bottom 5 in all 4 categories perhaps that’s not surprising.

ONS Well-being Survey
How anxious did you feel yesterday?
Least anxious Most anxious
Enfield Hackney
Barnet Barking and Dagenham
Harrow Lambeth
Newham Southwark
Hillingdon Islington

The least anxious were not in the affluent areas that scored well in other categories but in the North London boroughs of Enfield, Barnet and Harrow.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Are you a north of the river or south of the river Londoner?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over 50% of London babies have mothers born outside the UK

Baby hand

More than half the babies in London last year were born to mothers who were from outside the UK. Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that 58% of new Londoners had mothers who were born outside the UK.  That’s more than double the national rate as across the country non-UK mums account for 27% of births.

In 3 boroughs, Newham, Westminster and Brent, three quarters of the births were to mothers from outside the UK. Since 2004 Newham has had the highest rate in the country for births by women born overseas. Last year it was 76.4%.

The boroughs with the lowest rates of births to mothers born overseas are Havering, Bromley and Bexley. With 28% non UK-born mothers Havering comes closest to the national average.

Mothers born outside UK

National data shows that Poland, Pakistan and India are the most common countries of birth for mothers who are not UK-born. The Polish-born population of the UK has increased 10-fold in the past 10 years.

Of the 127,000 babies born in London in 2014, 25,000 had mothers born in Asia or the Middle East, 20,000 had mothers born in the EU, the majority in newer EU members, which includes Poland, and nearly 17,000 had mothers from Africa.

Across London the most common region of birth for mothers from outside the UK varies from borough to borough. In 6 of the 14 inner London boroughs, including Haringey and Islington, it is the EU. In 10 of the 19 outer London boroughs, including Hillingdon, Harrow, Redbridge and Sutton, it is Asia and the Middle East. For 8 boroughs, including Lewisham, Southwark and Barking and Dagenham, it is Africa.

Source data

See also

Muhammad and Amelia top London’s baby name charts, again

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

Our multi-lingual city – English second language for half of primary pupils

Mapping Londoners: Born in Uganda

Ugandan-born Londoners have a preference for boroughs in the north west of the city. Harrow is the favourite place to live but across the capital there are also large groups of Ugandan-born people in Croydon, Redbridge and Newham.

Born in Uganda

According to the 2011 census there were 32,000 people resident in London who were born in Uganda. The latest estimates in the Annual Population Survey suggests that number may have declined to around 25,000 in 2014.

Ugandans are the 6th largest group of African-born people in the capital. The country was part of the British Empire and gained independence in 1962. Some who identified themselves as Ugandan-born in the census may be of Asian descent and came to Britain after they were expelled from Uganda by the then president, Idi Amin, in 1972

Source data

More population maps

 

Renting in London: 3 bedroom homes

The additional cost of living in London for a family seeking a 3 bedroom house is punishing. As previously reported by Urbs, the premium charged is at its highest for this size of property, 150% above median rent for England.

Renting 3 bed

The nature of the housing stock in different parts of the city becomes more apparent in the map for this size of property. There is no data for the City as it has so little of this sort of housing. Kensington and Chelsea does have supply of medium sized homes, but at a huge premium, more than 3 times the median rent.

The inner boroughs and the leafier neighbourhood of Richmond can command rents in excess of £2,000 a month. Further out in boroughs like Harrow and Merton prices drop to around £1,500

Rental 3 bed map

Data from the Valuation Office Agency, the body that advises the government on property values, shows that it is only in the 3 most easterly boroughs that median monthly rental is at £1,200 and below.

Source data

More on Renting in London

Renting in London: A Room

For many people coming to London, particularly younger people, their first experience of setting up home in the capital is renting a room in a shared house.

As with all levels of property, that’s considerably more expensive than in the rest of the England; £525 per month compared to £341, according to the Valuation Office Agency, the body that advises the government on property values.

Rental room

But across the capital, are there any bargains to be had in the communal living lifestyle? The closest you will get to the England average is in Havering where a room costs £417. Prices are generally cheapest in the east of city where there are 6 boroughs with monthly prices below £500.

Rental room map

Across the capital Croydon, Sutton, Hillingdon, Harrow and Enfield also duck under the £500-a-month bar.

At the other end of the scale, you can pay double that in the City and not much less in Westminster and Kensington and Chelsea.

Source data

Renting in London: A Studio

More on Renting in London

Mapping Londoners: Born in Kenya

Kenyan-born Londoners are the third largest group from Africa. There are 64,000 in the capital, far fewer than the 114,00 Nigerians, but only a little behind the 65,000 Somalis.

Figures from the last census show that Kenyans are strongly concentrated in the North West of London, especially Harrow where there are nearly 12,000.

Many Kenyan-born Londoners are ethnically South Asian and were forced to leave the country in the 1960s and 70s, as they were from Uganda.

Born in Kenya

Source data

More population maps