Cheaper in the Championship but many fans still paying some premier prices

Picure: © Photospook ┃Creative Commons

Picure: © Photospook ┃Creative Commons

For most London fans the cost of following football is considerably cheaper in the Championship or lower leagues than the top flight, but there are still some premier rate prices being charged for lower league football.

The average season ticket price for a Championship club in London is much lower than the Premier League, as you might expect. The average for the most expensive season ticket was £651 while the average price for the cheapest season ticket in the Premier League is £658.

But the averages hide some surprising facts. Data gathered by the BBC in its Price of Football Study shows that the most expensive season ticket at Crystal Palace and newly promoted Watford are below £700 but a top of the range season ticket at relegated QPR is £719 and at Fulham it is £839, the highest in the Championship.

The ticket pricing reflects clubs adjusting after promotion and relegation. Watford went up and their cheapest season ticket rose by £19 to £385. QPR fell out of the Premier League and their cheapest season ticket was reduced by more than £100 but is still £389. Adjustments are also made on match day tickets. Watford increased their cheapest match day ticket from £14 to £36. At QPR it is down £1 to £24.

Football season ticket championship

There’s a similar scenario at Millwall. The cheapest and most expensive season tickets at The Den are frozen at last season’s prices although the club is now playing League 1 football. The cheapest match day ticket has been reduced by £1.

Leyton Orient dropped the cheapest season ticket price by £40 on being relegated to League 2 but at £180 it is still a fiver more than Charlton’s cheapest and they’re playing in the Championship

Football season tickets L 1 2

 

Fans always have the option to buy single tickets rather than one for the season, but the price of a big day out at the game does not come cheap either. Urbs took the median ticket price and added a replica shirt, programme, a pie and a cup of tea to calculate the cost of a one off match day experience. Our calculations show that it is cheaper than the Premier League but there’s not a huge difference between the Championship and League 2.

Football match day championship

Football match day L1 2

The biggest cost is the replica shirt, particular if you want the orange and black hoops of Barnet, just up from the Conference this season, but with a Premier League price on the kit. One saving you do make at The Hive is the price of a pie.  Barnet don’t have any, and neither do AFC Wimbledon.

Following football is packed with highs and lows for fans, but one thing remains consistent, it is punishing on the pocket.

Source data

See also

Season ticket price freeze but what’s the cost of a day out for a less loyal fan?

Met earns millions for policing football but costs are higher still

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

Met earns millions for policing football but costs are higher still

policeThe Metropolitan Police was paid more that £10 million for policing matches in the Premier League and Football League from 2010 to 2014.

And more than a third of that money came from Arsenal, who paid more than double their north London rival Tottenham and nearly 3 times as much as Chelsea.

The figures on income from policing fooball were revealed by the Metropolitan Police in response to a freedom on information request. It shows that income from all clubs in the 2013/14 season was £1.9 million, down from almost £2.5 million the season before.

Metropolitan Police, Income from Premier League and Football League clubs
2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 Total
All Clubs £2,637,621 £3,112,736 £2,482,180 £1,908,954 £10,141,491
Arsenal £923,462 £943,136 £923,462 £767,075 £3,557,135
Chelsea £318,350 £328,897 £318,350 £237,235 £1,202,832
Crystal Palace 188,705 £219,204 £174,120 £62,945 £644,974
Fulham £155,671 £190,771 £157,671 £99,136 £603,249
QPR £109,101 £138,674 £87,901 £51,556 £387,232
Tottenham £404,265 £423,486 £404,265 £283,587 £1,515,603
West Ham £189,694 £537,934 £189,694 187,303 £1,104,625

Arsenal’s Emirates stadium has the largest capacity in London after Wembley with seating for more than 60,000, but taking the charges as a cost per seat still show Arsenal paying a much bigger bill. On the basis of the 2013/14 season Arsenal paid £12.69 per seat, Chelsea £5,67 and Tottenham £7.81.

Policing of matches has been a contentious issue with the football authorities arguing that part of the cost should be met within the regular police budget and that is it unfair to charge all costs to the clubs.

A legal ruling in 2008 said the clubs could only be held liable for costs incurred for policing in their ‘footprint’, meaning inside a stadium or in the area immediately surrounding it.. That means a substantial shortfall for the police for the cost of officers on the routes to and from the grounds.

Information previously released by the Met shows that it estimates that the cost of policing Premier League matches in the 2012/13 season was £3.25 million. The most recent data release shows that the income from the 6 clubs in the league that season was £2.08 million.

The bill for the Met has gone up since. In response to a question from Labour London Assembly member Andrew Dinsmore the Mayor has revealed that the cost to the force for policing outside club ‘footprints’ was £1.9 million in the last season, 2014/15.

Guidelines issued by the Association of Chief Police Officers in 2014 says that all the costs of policing a football match should be recovered. But the arrangements between forces and clubs are subject to individual agreements and the debate about who pays the bill is likely to continue.

Source data

See also

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

Footy fans get a great deal in London – on the tea, at least

 

Urban chic or leafy charm? Inner city rentals catch up with affluent areas

© Paulmaguire | Dreamstime.com - To Let Sign UK Photo-2

Photo: © Paulmaguire | Dreamstime.com

Hackney or Richmond? Brent or Fulham? Where would you prefer to rent a property? There’s now nothing in the price difference to help you decide.

Monthly rents are over the £1,200 mark in a number of historically poorer boroughs that are increasingly fashionable and gentrified, bringing them into line with the traditionally affluent areas.

Using data from the Valuation Office Agency, a government advisory body on property, Urbs looked at median prices to eliminate the effect of the high and low extremes.   The median monthly rental cost in Brent is £1,300, as it is in Hammersmith and Fulham. It’s £1,257 for a slice of Hackney’s urban chic, compared to £1,295 for leafy Richmond.

Median rent

The highest rates are in the central areas with the median rent in the City of London now heading for £2,000. Westminster and Camden are close behind.

All but 13 of the 32 boroughs have a median monthly rental of £1,000 or more. The outer boroughs of Sutton and Hillingdon offer better value but only Havering has a median monthly rental price below £800.

London continues to be by far the most expensive place to rent a property in the country.

Median rental national

The median monthly rental price across London is currently £1,350, a 3% increase year-on-year and double that of all regions of the UK except the South East.

 

Source data

See also:

Rents rise by 31% in 10 years

Landlords reclaim record number of rented homes

 

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

By Ben Sutherland Flickr- Loftus Road Stadium

Photo: Ben Sutherland (Flickr- Loftus Road Stadium) |Creative Commons

Going to a football match in London rates poorly with away fans, according to a survey carried out by the Football Supporters’ Federation.

It asked 4000 fans to rate their experience of away games. The average score out of 10 for Premier League clubs outside London was 6.4. But for London grounds in the top flight it was 5.4.

To add further misery to a terrible season for QPR, the club has managed to come bottom of another league. A visit to Loftus Road was rated as the worst away experience in the Premier League or the Championship with a score of just 3.6.

Crystal Palace fared little better. While the Holmesdale end is happily singing the praises of Alan Pardew fans in the away corner are giving Selhurst Park a thumbs down with a score of 4.9.

The best Premier League experience in London is at Arsenal’s £390 million palace, the Emirates Stadium, the UK’s third biggest ground after Wembley and Old Trafford. Away fans gave it a generous 6.8. Spurs came second behind their north London rivals.

Away fans

Supporters were asked to rate their away experience based on transport links, turnstiles, stadium layout, sightlines, food and drink, and safety and security.

The top Premier League experience was at the KC Stadium with a score of 7.7, a small consolation for relegated Hull City. The overall winner out of both Premier League and the Championship was Wigan Athletic.

The best experiences in London were at Championship Fulham and at Watford, who will be welcoming the top clubs and their supporters to Vicarage Road next season.

Supporters were also asked what factors influenced their decision about whether to attend an away game. Price and distance were significant factors but with a heavy dose of realism only 4% cited the likelihood of victory as the reason to travel.

Source data

See also:

Footy fans get a great deal in London – on the tea, at least

 

Is our open space really open?

Richmond Park dawn copyLondon enjoys a reputation as a city of green spaces thanks to the parks spread across the centre.  But less than half of the open space in London is actually open to the public.  The rest is private land and gardens.

London sprawls across 1,594 square kilometres.  Data from Greenspace Information for Greater London shows that 622 square kilometres are designated as open space, which means the land hasn’t been developed.  That’s 39.4% of the total area and it puts London in the top flight of cities for open spaces.  Vienna, Singapore and Sydney all have a little more. But a closer look at the figures show that 52% of open space in London is not publicly accessible.

Most of the outer London boroughs have large areas of open space, as you might expect.  Bromley, the biggest borough by area has the most.  Data analysis by Urbs reveal that it also has the lowest proportion accessible to the public – just 21%. Richmond is about the third the size of Bromley, and has the same proportion of open space.  But in Richmond more than two thirds of the open space is accessible. This is likely due to the expanse of Richmond Park.

The borough with the highest proportion of accessible open space is Tower Hamlets with 80% accessibility. The inner city east London area may near the bottom of the table for available space but most of what it does have is open to all.

Open spaces 2 map

Finally,  spare a thought for the 11,000 residents of Town ward in Fulham.  According to the data the amount of open space in their 65 hectare neighbourhood is zero.

 

 Source Data