Cheaper in the Championship but many fans still paying some premier prices

Picure: © Photospook ┃Creative Commons

Picure: © Photospook ┃Creative Commons

For most London fans the cost of following football is considerably cheaper in the Championship or lower leagues than the top flight, but there are still some premier rate prices being charged for lower league football.

The average season ticket price for a Championship club in London is much lower than the Premier League, as you might expect. The average for the most expensive season ticket was £651 while the average price for the cheapest season ticket in the Premier League is £658.

But the averages hide some surprising facts. Data gathered by the BBC in its Price of Football Study shows that the most expensive season ticket at Crystal Palace and newly promoted Watford are below £700 but a top of the range season ticket at relegated QPR is £719 and at Fulham it is £839, the highest in the Championship.

The ticket pricing reflects clubs adjusting after promotion and relegation. Watford went up and their cheapest season ticket rose by £19 to £385. QPR fell out of the Premier League and their cheapest season ticket was reduced by more than £100 but is still £389. Adjustments are also made on match day tickets. Watford increased their cheapest match day ticket from £14 to £36. At QPR it is down £1 to £24.

Football season ticket championship

There’s a similar scenario at Millwall. The cheapest and most expensive season tickets at The Den are frozen at last season’s prices although the club is now playing League 1 football. The cheapest match day ticket has been reduced by £1.

Leyton Orient dropped the cheapest season ticket price by £40 on being relegated to League 2 but at £180 it is still a fiver more than Charlton’s cheapest and they’re playing in the Championship

Football season tickets L 1 2

 

Fans always have the option to buy single tickets rather than one for the season, but the price of a big day out at the game does not come cheap either. Urbs took the median ticket price and added a replica shirt, programme, a pie and a cup of tea to calculate the cost of a one off match day experience. Our calculations show that it is cheaper than the Premier League but there’s not a huge difference between the Championship and League 2.

Football match day championship

Football match day L1 2

The biggest cost is the replica shirt, particular if you want the orange and black hoops of Barnet, just up from the Conference this season, but with a Premier League price on the kit. One saving you do make at The Hive is the price of a pie.  Barnet don’t have any, and neither do AFC Wimbledon.

Following football is packed with highs and lows for fans, but one thing remains consistent, it is punishing on the pocket.

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See also

Season ticket price freeze but what’s the cost of a day out for a less loyal fan?

Met earns millions for policing football but costs are higher still

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

Season ticket price freeze but what’s the cost of a day out for a less loyal fan?

Picture © joshjdss via Creative Commonsjpg-2

Picture © joshjdss via Creative Commons

The cost of going to football for most loyal London fans of Premier League clubs has been frozen or increased by modest amounts this season. This sounds like good news until you realise that London clubs have some of the highest season ticket prices in the top flight.

Arsenal remains the most expensive. The most costly season ticket at the Emirates is £2,013 and the cheapest over £1,000. Arsenal froze season ticket prices this season, as did Chelsea, and Tottenham Hotspur. West Ham pushed up their most expensive season ticket by £20 compared to last season, and the cheapest by £15. Crystal Palace added £5 to the most expensive but took £7 off the cheapest.

Football season tickets 15

Newly promoted Watford added £19 to the cheapest season-long seat at Vicarage Road. But their cheapest match day ticket last season of £14 has gone with promotion. The cheapest now is £36.

The data is revealed in the BBC’s annual Price of Football Study. This year it looked at the prices at 227 clubs in 13 leagues across the UK.

The average match day price for the cheapest ticket across London is now £32.50. That average number is helped up by Chelsea who charge £52 for the cheapest ticket to Stamford Bridge. That’s the most expensive cheap seat in the country.

The study shows that little has changed for season tickets holders, but for those who are less committed or just want to experience the top level of English football what would be the cost of a big day out? Urbs did some calculations.

We looked at the prices to give a fan the full experience. On ticketing we took the median price of the most popular match day tickets. We added a replica shirt so you could join the tribe, a programme so you could get the words of wisdom from the manager, plus a pie and a cuppa at half time.

Our number crunching shows that ever-expensive Arsenal comes out as the priciest day out. Watford offer the best value, as you might expect for a newly promoted side, and an afternoon at Selhurst Park shouting for Crystal Palace is at the lower end, apart from those pricey pies.

 

The Premier League likes to think that it is the best in the world. When you consider that it is still possible to buy a match day ticket at Bayern Munich for £12, at these prices it had better be.

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See also

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

Met earns millions for policing football but costs are higher still

 

 

 

Met earns millions for policing football but costs are higher still

policeThe Metropolitan Police was paid more that £10 million for policing matches in the Premier League and Football League from 2010 to 2014.

And more than a third of that money came from Arsenal, who paid more than double their north London rival Tottenham and nearly 3 times as much as Chelsea.

The figures on income from policing fooball were revealed by the Metropolitan Police in response to a freedom on information request. It shows that income from all clubs in the 2013/14 season was £1.9 million, down from almost £2.5 million the season before.

Metropolitan Police, Income from Premier League and Football League clubs
2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 Total
All Clubs £2,637,621 £3,112,736 £2,482,180 £1,908,954 £10,141,491
Arsenal £923,462 £943,136 £923,462 £767,075 £3,557,135
Chelsea £318,350 £328,897 £318,350 £237,235 £1,202,832
Crystal Palace 188,705 £219,204 £174,120 £62,945 £644,974
Fulham £155,671 £190,771 £157,671 £99,136 £603,249
QPR £109,101 £138,674 £87,901 £51,556 £387,232
Tottenham £404,265 £423,486 £404,265 £283,587 £1,515,603
West Ham £189,694 £537,934 £189,694 187,303 £1,104,625

Arsenal’s Emirates stadium has the largest capacity in London after Wembley with seating for more than 60,000, but taking the charges as a cost per seat still show Arsenal paying a much bigger bill. On the basis of the 2013/14 season Arsenal paid £12.69 per seat, Chelsea £5,67 and Tottenham £7.81.

Policing of matches has been a contentious issue with the football authorities arguing that part of the cost should be met within the regular police budget and that is it unfair to charge all costs to the clubs.

A legal ruling in 2008 said the clubs could only be held liable for costs incurred for policing in their ‘footprint’, meaning inside a stadium or in the area immediately surrounding it.. That means a substantial shortfall for the police for the cost of officers on the routes to and from the grounds.

Information previously released by the Met shows that it estimates that the cost of policing Premier League matches in the 2012/13 season was £3.25 million. The most recent data release shows that the income from the 6 clubs in the league that season was £2.08 million.

The bill for the Met has gone up since. In response to a question from Labour London Assembly member Andrew Dinsmore the Mayor has revealed that the cost to the force for policing outside club ‘footprints’ was £1.9 million in the last season, 2014/15.

Guidelines issued by the Association of Chief Police Officers in 2014 says that all the costs of policing a football match should be recovered. But the arrangements between forces and clubs are subject to individual agreements and the debate about who pays the bill is likely to continue.

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See also

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

Footy fans get a great deal in London – on the tea, at least

 

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

By Ben Sutherland Flickr- Loftus Road Stadium

Photo: Ben Sutherland (Flickr- Loftus Road Stadium) |Creative Commons

Going to a football match in London rates poorly with away fans, according to a survey carried out by the Football Supporters’ Federation.

It asked 4000 fans to rate their experience of away games. The average score out of 10 for Premier League clubs outside London was 6.4. But for London grounds in the top flight it was 5.4.

To add further misery to a terrible season for QPR, the club has managed to come bottom of another league. A visit to Loftus Road was rated as the worst away experience in the Premier League or the Championship with a score of just 3.6.

Crystal Palace fared little better. While the Holmesdale end is happily singing the praises of Alan Pardew fans in the away corner are giving Selhurst Park a thumbs down with a score of 4.9.

The best Premier League experience in London is at Arsenal’s £390 million palace, the Emirates Stadium, the UK’s third biggest ground after Wembley and Old Trafford. Away fans gave it a generous 6.8. Spurs came second behind their north London rivals.

Away fans

Supporters were asked to rate their away experience based on transport links, turnstiles, stadium layout, sightlines, food and drink, and safety and security.

The top Premier League experience was at the KC Stadium with a score of 7.7, a small consolation for relegated Hull City. The overall winner out of both Premier League and the Championship was Wigan Athletic.

The best experiences in London were at Championship Fulham and at Watford, who will be welcoming the top clubs and their supporters to Vicarage Road next season.

Supporters were also asked what factors influenced their decision about whether to attend an away game. Price and distance were significant factors but with a heavy dose of realism only 4% cited the likelihood of victory as the reason to travel.

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See also:

Footy fans get a great deal in London – on the tea, at least

 

Sporty Londoners prefer solo exercise

h38% of Londoners are taking part in some form of sporting activity at least once a week.  While solo sports are the favourite way of keeping fit, football is by far the most popular team game with 5% of people over 16 playing each week.

The data on sport in the capital is captured in the Active People survey carried out by Sport England.  They spoke to 160,000 people across England in October last year.  Urbs took a detailed look at the data for people over 16 participating in sport at least once a week.

Sports such as running, swimming, cycling or going to the gym are by far the most popular with 30% of Londoners exercising on their own.  12% are down the gym, making it the favourite solo sporting activity. 6% are swimming,  which is becoming less popular.

Team sports are played by 7% of adults. Football dominates participation in team games and has grown in popularity since 2010. Football also proves more popular in London than the rest of England.

1 on 1 games like tennis and badminton also feature in the survey responses.  These games are enjoyed by 4% of over 16s in the capital.

Sport participation

Londoners emerge from the survey as slightly more active than people across England and with more taking part in sport than in 2010.  But that still leave 62% sitting on the sofa or watching from the sideline rather than taking part.

Source data

Footy fans get a great deal in London – on the tea, at least

© Jasonbatterham | Dreamstime.com -  Emirates Stadium seating

© Jasonbatterham | Dreamstime.com – detail view Emirates Stadium seating

The football season’s not over yet, but London fans best start saving for next.  Data analysis by Urbs of information gathered by the BBC from 207 clubs show that fans of London teams in the Premier League will again be paying over the odds compared to the rest of the country.

Urbs compared the prices of season and match day tickets at the 6 London clubs with the 14 others in the Premier League. The average price in London for the cheapest season ticket is 56% higher than the average outside the capital. For the most expensive season ticket its 88% higher.

There’s a similar story for match day tickets.  At London Premier League grounds the prices are 10% more expensive on average for cheaper seats and 53% higher for the top price ones.

Looking at the details, club by club Arsenal top the table for season ticket prices.  The most expensive at the Emirates is £2,013.  It’s a shade cheaper at their north London rivals, Tottenham. West Ham’s most pricey season ticket is less than half that at £940.  The cheapest season ticket in London is at Crystal Palace.  At £420 it is less than the average price for the 14 teams outside London.

Football season tickets

The highest match day entry is also at the Emirates at £97 for the best seat.  The best in the ground is cheaper at Stamford Bridge but the lowest on the day deal if you want to see Chelsea is still £50.  The lowest match day price is at West Ham with £20 for the cheapest but £75 for the most expensive.  That compares to the out of London average prices of £28 and £49.

Football match day tickets

There is one small piece of good news for fans in London.  The tea is cheaper by an average of 4p a cup.  But as our “pie” chart below shows,  there are few bargains to be had when it comes to getting something to eat.

Football pie prices

BBC Price of football calculator