A third of 10 and 11-year-olds obese in two areas of London

shutterstock_291654485-2London’s record on childhood obesity has been poor and getting worst for some time. But data for small areas released by Public Health England raise new levels of concern as in two neigbbourhoods a third of the 10 and 11-year old children are now obese.

In the electoral ward of Camberwell Green, Southwark 34% of Year 6 children are obese. In Hoxton West in Hackney its 33%.  Only one other area of England has a higher level – 35% in Sutton-on-Sea in Lincolnshire.

The Public Health England data covers nearly 7,500 electoral wards in England and it shows that six of the ten worst areas for childhood obesity among Year 6 children are in London.

Obesity Year 6 wards-2

It’s a similar pattern for children in Reception, aged 4 and 5, where Woodberry Down ward in Hackney has the worst record in the country and a rate that is double the England average. Six other neighbourhoods in the capital are also among the worst ten in England for this age group.

Obesity reception ward-2

This small area data is gathered by Public Health England to help target resources to combat child weight problems.

The poor record on obesity for primary school children is reflected more broadly at borough level and underlines that London has one of the most severe problems in the country.

At Reception age,  six of the ten local authorities with the highest rates are in London.  The highest level local authority average rate in the England is nearly 14% in Barking and Dagenham. Greenwich, Newham, Hackney, Southwark and Tower Hamlets all have rates of 12% or above.

The obesity rates in these boroughs doubles for Year 6 children. Enfield and Westminster also have more than a quarter of Year 6 children classified as obese.  Eight of the ten local authorities in England with the highest obesity rates for 10 and 11-year olds are in London.

Source data

See also

How the obesity rate doubled for the class of 2007

Childhood obesity highest in London

Thousands of children sent to hospital because of tooth decay

 

Borough Profile: Enfield

People

There are 330,968 people living in Enfield, that’s 3.8% of the 8.6 million Londoners.

The average age of the population is 36.2 years old, that’s 0.3 years older than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 23% of the population compared to 13% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 42% of the residents. 33% of the people living in Enfield were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Turkey and makes up 5% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Cyprus (Not otherwise specified). More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Romania and Bulgaria.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £285,000.   Owner occupiers outnumber those who rent with 26% owning their home outright and a further 36% with a mortgage compared to 21% who rent privately and a further 17% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,395.

Crime

The crime rate in Enfield is 69 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84.

The Area

Enfield covers an area of 8,083 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 46% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Enfield is below the national average with 73% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £34,349 and for women it is lower at £27,932.  The median income for a household in the borough is £41,250.

The workforce is among the less qualified in London with 43% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 5% have no qualifications and 3% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 119,653 cars in the borough, which equates to 1.0 cars per household.  Enfield is rated as below average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 7.9% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Enfield can expect to live until they are 81, for women life expectancy is 84 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 152.0 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 7% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 25% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.3 out of 10, which is below average for London.

Diabetes in Enfield

Enfield has one of the worst records in London for diabetes and the number of sufferers will climb by 10,316 the next 20 years, placing huge pressure on local health services, according to Public Health England.

There are currently 24,515 people with diabetes in the borough, up by 460 on last year. Some 9.5% of all the people living in Enfield have the condition, which is above the national rate of 8.6%. But forecasts by PHE, a government agency, show that by 2020 the rate will have gone up to 9.7% and in 2035 will hit 10.8%.

Diabetes 2035

The agency based its predictions on health surveys carried out over three years and focused on people over the age of 16. PHE says that around 90% of the new cases will be Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by lifestyle factors and linked to obesity. It says these cases are preventable and tackling the problem is fundamental to the future of the health service.

The increased prevalence of the condition coincides with a rise in the population of the capital in the coming decades. There will be 895,489 diabetes sufferers across London’s 33 boroughs by 2035, and 3.9% of them will live in Enfield .

Diabetes is caused by the inability of the body to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Sufferers may also develop kidney disease and foot ulcers, which can lead to amputation.

Source data

More diabetes stories

 

Fuel consumption down but scale of diesel use remains a worry for health

Cab speeds past-2The amount of fuel consumed by vehicles on the roads of London has fallen by nearly a third over the past 10 years.

The biggest reduction has been in personal travel, which includes cars, motorbikes and buses. Fuel usage in these types of transport is down by 31%.  The reduction for freight transport, which includes vans and lorries, is down by 22%. Personal travel accounts for 2½ times the fuel consumed by freight.

As previously reported by Urbs, traffic volumes have gone down by about 7% since 2004 despite a rising population. But the reduction in fuel consumption can also be attributed to better fuel economy for vehicles.

The estimates are based upon data modelling by the Department of Energy and Climate Change and it shows that fuel consumption, like car ownership, is highest in the outer boroughs, particularly those north of the river, such as Enfield, Barnet and Havering. The highest consumption level is in Hillingdon.

Fuel consumption

The estimates look at where fuel is consumed rather than where it was bought so areas with large arterial roads are likely to have higher consumption levels – the M4 running out through Hillingdon or the M1 in Barnet, for example.

The reduction in consumption is good news environmentally but the data reveals a statistic which is having an impact on the city’s air quality – the shift from petrol to diesel cars. In 2004 consumption of diesel was about 20% of the consumption level for petrol. By 2013 it was 67%.

Diesel engines were promoted by the government as they produce lower levels of emissions that contribute to climate change, but they produce higher levels of N02.  Recent research by Kings College found that NO2 is having a far more harmful impact on health than had been previously recognised and responsible for nearly 6,000 deaths a year.

Source data

See also

London leads the way in declining car use but the East is bucking the trend

Nearly 9,500 deaths a year – study reveals impact of air pollution

Most boroughs fail on legal limit for toxic gas that could harm health

Emission targets at risk as growing population hits greener city plan

 

Far more 16-year-olds staying in school in London than across the UK

students hands up-2Far more young people are staying on in full-time education in London than elsewhere in the country.  Nearly half as many leave school at 16, 22% compared to 40% nationally.

London also has the highest rate of people entering further education after school age, with a third of people studying full time until they are 20 -23.

Leaving age London v UK

This trend for more time in education has been developing over a number of years in both London and the UK and is captured in data gathered by the Office for National Statistics through its Annual Population Survey.  The latest breakdown of these figures at borough level is for 2014 and it shows a wide discrepancy in the age of leaving education across the capital.

Nearly half the young people in Havering and 40% in Bexley leave education at 16.  School leaver rates are also high in Barking and Dagenham, and Enfield.  In comparison, the boroughs in the west of the city have large proportions staying in education. Just 9% in Richmond leave school at 16, 11% in Westminster, 12% in Kensington and Chelsea, and 13% in Wandsworth, and Hammersmith and Fulham.Leaving age boroughsWhen these numbers are combined with those leaving full time education at 19 three quarters of people are out of education in Havering by that age and 60% or more in Enfield, Sutton, Barking and Dagenham, and Bexley.

But in Wandsworth, Camden, Kensington and Chelsea, Hammersmith and Fulham, and Westminster fewer than a third have left education.

This inner-outer, east-west divide is also evident in those staying in education until aged 24 and over.  In Kensington and Chelsea 22% are in education until this age and it’s nearly 20% I Hammersmith and Fulham, and Westminster.  But Havering has just 4% of people coming out of education at 24 and over, with 5% in Bexley and Enfield.

The data also reveals that some of London’s 16-69 year-old have never been in full-time education. In Tower Hamlets, Newham and Waltham Forest it is an estimated 3% of the adult population under 70.

Source data

See also

Fight for reception gets tougher as more kids swell primary school demand

105,000 extra secondary pupils pose huge challenge for capital’s schools

Where are all the young people? The in-out flow of 20-something Londoners

 

 

Huge pay gap in hourly rates between full time and part time workers

Daniel Wilson shutterstock_95849584-1-2-1People working part time are paid a little over half the hourly rate of those working in full-time employment, and the gap between full time and part time rates is wider in London than any area of the country.

Latest figures for earnings from the Office for National Statistics show that the median hourly rate in London is £9.22 if you work part time but £16.16 for those with a full-time job.

A quarter of the jobs in London are part time and many of them are low skilled. That’s 1.24 million jobs, with some people doing more than one to make up full time hours but being paid a fraction of what they might earn as a full time employee.

In London the gap in hourly rates of pay is 43% but in every other region of the country it is 40% of less. In the South West of England part time workers earn an hourly rate of 68% the full time rate, compared to 57% in London.

The median hourly rate for part time work in the capital is just 14p higher than the next nearest region, the South East of England, but £1.20 higher than the lowest paid region, the North East.

Hourly earnings part time regional

The figures are based on a sample of PAYE records and the ONS calculates a median, or mid point, rather than an average, which might be distorted by a small number of very high rates.

People living in Newham have a lower hourly part time rate than any region of the country and are typically being paid less than those living in Newcastle or Sunderland, where the cost of living is lower.

The rate is only a little higher in neighbouring Tower Hamlets and across the capital median hourly rates for part time workers are below the London Living Wage in 15 of the 33 boroughs – Croydon, Merton, Greenwich, Lambeth, Tower Hamlets, Newham, Barking and Dagenham, Hounslow, Ealing, Brent, Camden, Hackney, Haringey, Enfield and Waltham Forest.

Hourly earnings part time map

The Greater London Authority sets the London Living Wage. It is a voluntary rate and promoted by the Mayor, who is trying to get employers to sign up. At the time of the earnings survey in April the London Living Wage was £9.15. It was increased to £9.40 in October.

As previously reported by Urbs, there are three quarters of a million jobs in London paying less than the Living Wage.  Data shows that women are more likley than men to be in low paid work, and nearly half of those working for less than the London Living Wage are under 24.

Source data

See also

Lowest paid living in Newham as rates remain static across capital

Over 750,000 jobs pay less than the living wage in the capital

Buying a home gets further out of reach, now 11 times annual salary

 

 

Lowest paid living in Newham as rates remain static across capital

Pay ShaunWilkinson shutterstock_207548536-1-2

Photo: Shaun Wilkinson ┃Shutterstock.com

The lowest paid full time workers in London appear to be living in Newham. Hourly rates of pay for residents of the East London borough are lower than the typical rate for the UK generally at £12.90.

People living in the City of London or the best-paid borough, Westminster, are typically earning in excess of £250 per week more with an hourly rate of pay over £20.

The figures are revealed in the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings from the Office for National Statistics. They are based upon a sample of PAYE tax records and are considered the most reliable guide to pay rates.

Newham is not the only London borough where the median pay rate is below the rate for the UK generally. In Barking and Dagenham the full time hourly rate is £13.31, that’s 5p per hour below the UK median rate.

In contrast, across the river from Newham, the hourly rate in Greenwich is £3 higher.

Hourly pay full time London map

The median rate in Brent is below £14 per hour. In Enfield, Haringey, Waltham Forest, Hounslow and Ealing it is below £15.

Outside the centre, rates are highest in a pocket of South West London. Kensington and Chelsea, Richmond and Wandsworth have rates above £19 per hour. In Hammersmith and Fulham it is above £18.

The ONS uses a median rate or mid point rather than calculating an average, which would be distorted by a small number of very highly paid people. The rates are before tax and do not include overtime.

Rates of pay in London remain higher than the rest of the country. The London-wide median rate for full time employment is £16.16, £1.44 per hour more than the next nearest region, the South East of England, and £4.15 more than the lowest paid region, Northern Ireland.

Hourly rates full time regional

The median rate across the UK moved very little in the past year, rising by just 1.5% but that is 5 times higher than London where the hourly rate rose by just 5p since 2014.

Source data

See also

Over 750,000 jobs pay less than the living wage in the capital

Paying the rent takes up 72% of income for private tenants

A prosperity divide and neither rich nor poor seem happy

© Acmanley | Dreamstime.com - London Street Art Photo

Photo: © Acmanley | Dreamstime.com

The people of Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea and Camden are among the wealthiest on average in the UK, but money is not buying them happiness, as they are more miserable than many across the country.

These findings emerge in an index that looks at the combination of wealth and life satisfaction to indicate levels of prosperity. It suggests that 6 London boroughs (Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London) are the most prosperous in the country. But 4 others (Bexley, Greenwich, Brent and Croydon) are in the bottom 10 of 170 areas assessed.

The high prosperity scores for London boroughs are based largely on wealth not well-being. The Legatum Institute, a think tank that says that it is focused on promoting prosperity, put the index together. It used GDP per capita as a measure of wealth and the life satisfaction data collected by the Office for National Statistics.

Residents in Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London, enjoy an average income of £133,000. 15 of the top 20 areas in the UK for average earnings, including Tower Hamlets, Hackney, Newham, Lambeth, Southwark, Lewisham, Haringey and Islington, are in London. But the spread of wealth is not uniform across the capital and some boroughs come at the lower end of the table. Redbridge, Waltham Forest, Enfield and Barking and Dagenham have average earnings of £14,300.

What is common to all London boroughs however is the low level of life satisfaction. The happiest place in the UK according the ONS measure is the Outer Hebrides. Out of 170 areas the only London borough to squeeze into the top 50 is Bromley at 49 in the rankings.

Wealthy Hammersmith and Fulham and Kensington and Chelsea are down in the mid 80s and only 6 other boroughs (Ealing, Merton, Sutton, Kingston, Richmond and Hounslow) make it into the top 100.

While residents of Camden and the City of London come top for earnings they are in the bottom 10 when it comes to happiness, along with Croydon and Brent. Haringey and Islington folk also seem to be miserable – 11th from bottom in the life satisfaction rankings.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Pay rates underline gap between rich and poor boroughs

Welcome to the city of the super rich

 

 

Growing illegal dumping problem costs £20 million to clear up

Sebastian Ballard [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http---creativecommons.org-licenses-by-sa-2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons-1.jpg

Photo: Sebastian Ballard ┃CC BY-SA 2.0

Clearing up illegally dumped rubbish cost taxpayers in London nearly £20 million in the last financial year.   8 of the 10 councils in the country with the biggest problem for fly-tipping are in London, and the problem is getting worse with a 12% increase in dumping incidents in the past 12 months.

Newham has the biggest problem in the country, as it did in the previous year, with more than 70,000 incidents recorded. Enfield had more than 50,000, a 57% increase on 2013/14. In comparison there were fewer than 1,000 recorded incidents in Kingston.

The clear up costs in Newham alone came to £3.34 million. Haringey and Enfield are both paying in excess of £2 million and Croydon and Southwark paid more than a million.

Fly-tipping in London
Number of incidents Clear-up costs
Newham 70,192 £3,339,219
Enfield 50,121 £2,015,058
Haringey 25,709 £2,193,945
Southwark 25,583 £1,063,934
Croydon 18,560 £1,568,123

Newham says that the large number of incidents may be down to better reporting thanks to 7-day a week street cleaning and improved technology for recording incidents.

Two thirds of the incidents in Newham involved fly-tipping on roadsides. Among the things dumped were 1,200 so-called white goods, such as fridges and washing machines.

Enfield recorded 1,322 incidents of fly-tipping on railway lines. It is a problem peculiar to the area as next nearest council with such incidents was Lewisham with just 7.

Clearing up in Haringey and Croydon costs double that of the other boroughs with the most substantial problems. The cost per incident in Croydon was £84.48 while in Newham and Enfield it is around half that. Haringey and Southwark recorded a very similar number of incidents but the clear up costs in Haringey are double those of Southwark.

The data gathered from the councils show that Enfield prosecuted 249 people for fly-tipping, more than any other London council. Newham took action in more than 8,000 cases, half of which involved a warning letter. It issued more than 2,000 fixed penalty notices fines and in a statement said that it had prosecuted 318 people for fly-tipping and littering, but no prosecutions for fly-tipping are recorded in the data from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Source data

See also

Fly-tipping hits 5 year high with Newham suffering the biggest problem

London is rubbish at recycling and many boroughs are getting worse

Emission targets at risk as growing population hits greener city plan

 

Low drug-related death rates hide middle-aged heroin problem

heroinLondon has the lowest rate of deaths caused by drug abuse for any region of England and Wales. Last year 226 people in the capital died as a result of taking drugs. Most of them were men and most of them were the result of an unintentional overdose.

In the early 90s London had the worst record in the country for drug related deaths. The number of people killed reached a peak at the end of the 90s.

Drugs death london

During that period rates in other regions of the country began to rise, particularly in the North West of England. In the 2000’s the rate in London began to fall gently and since 2011 London has had the lowest mortality rate. Last year there were 25.4 deaths per million people in the capital. In the North West of England the rate is over 60 per million and in the North East nearly 70. The North East has seen the biggest increase over 20 years. In 1993 its mortality rate for drug misuse was just 14 per million.

drugs national

The data is based on registered deaths where drug misuse is defined as the cause of death. The data is collected by the ONS. The national figures give some surprising insights into the demographics of drug abuse.

The group with the highest death rate through drug misuse are not young people, as might be assumed, but people 40-49. The number of heroin and morphine related deaths in this group for 2014 is the highest on record. People aged 30-39 have the second highest death rate. People in their 20s have a lower mortality for drug misuse than those in their 50s and 60s.

Drugs deaths age

Men are 2.5 times more likely than women to die from drug misuse. 79% of the male deaths were unintentional. The rate for women is slightly lower at 69% and women show a greater level of intentional self-harm.

The national data also shows a substantial increase in the number of deaths caused by heroin and morphine which have risen by two thirds between 2012 and 2014. Deaths caused by cocaine use have also increased.

The detailed data at local authority level is grouped in batches of 3 years. The picture for London for 2012-14 shows that the highest deaths rates are in Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea and Islington. The lowest rates are in the outer boroughs of Merton, Hillingdon and Enfield.

Drugs death map

 

Source data

See also

Violence, disruption and drugs – why 20,000 pupils were excluded from school last year