Tube Delays: Waterloo and City Line

Tube stationThe Waterloo and City Line connects Waterloo railway station with Bank in the City of London. With two stations and no stops in between, it is the most efficient line on the network in terms of time lost through disruption.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 12,314 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Waterloo and City Line. This is the best performance on the network.

LCH Waterloo City

As the chart shows, with few other issues to contend with, isolated strike action is responsible for a very high proportion of the lost hours.

The Waterloo and City Line is the shortest line travelling 1.47 miles in 4 minutes. It carries fewer passengers than any other Tube line. It was known by its passengers as “The Drain”, possible due to the seepage of water into the tunnels.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

Tube Delays: Victoria Line

Tube mapPassengers are the main cause of delays on the Victoria Line. Members of the public were behind 35% of the time lost to disruption on the line in 2014/15. That’s double the rate for any other line.

Delays caused by what TfL calls “customers and public action” include commuters taking ill, items dropped on the track and people jumping in front of trains. Documents published by TfL reveal that more than 20 people a year kill themselves on the Underground.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 129,010 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Victoria Line. This makes it one of the better performers.

LCH Victoria

The Victoria Line was the first to introduce automated operations where the train is controlled by computer overseen by a driver. These types of automated systems are also in use on the Central and Jubilee lines but only on the Victoria Line do they feature as a significant cause of Lost Customer Hours. They were blamed for 13% of the delays last year on this line.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Tube Delays: Northern Line

commuters tube escalatorThe Northern Line, formerly known as the misery line, has seen the best rate of improvement over the past decade in reducing the level of delays.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 139,252 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Northern line.

LCH NOrthern

Comparing its recent performance with the average for 2003/06 shows a reduction in LCH of 76%, the best record on the network.

The line has one of the highest proportions of disruption caused by passengers. This accounted for 27% of the delays in 2014/15 compared to 17% across the network.

Delays caused by what TfL calls “customers and public action” include commuters taking ill, items dropped on the track and people jumping in front of trains. Documents from TfL show that more than 20 people a year kill themselves on the Underground.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Tube Delays: Jubilee Line

Tube stationThe Jubilee is the newest Tube line but it faces an age-old problem for every urban underground – delays caused by its passengers. This was the single biggest factor in 2014/15 causing 22% of time lost compared to 17% for the whole network.

Delays caused by what TfL calls “customers and public action” include commuters taking ill, items dropped on the track and people jumping in front of trains. The grim “person under a train…” message is familiar and more than 20 people a year kill themselves on the Underground.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 292,033 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Jubilee line. This makes it the second highest on the network after the Central line.

LCH Jubilee

While the Jubilee line has seen an improvement over the past 10 years in Lost Customer Hours the numbers rose slightly at the start of 2015/16 year in April.

The Jubilee line is the only line to see “stations” listed as a significant source of delay. Although the line was opened as recently as 1979 a number of its stations date back 100 years and were used by other lines originally. The line was extended in the 1990s though the Docklands to Stratford.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

tube train interiorIf you are stuck on a platform waiting for a train or stranded in a tunnel aboard one Tube disruptions are frustrating, particularly when you are commuting and on a tight schedule. But how bad is your line?

At Urbs we have been looking at the reasons for Tube delays and the record for individual lines over the most recent 12-month period. So if you are asking yourself, “Why does this always happen to me?” Urbs has drawn up the Lost Hours League so you can check whether your line has been particularly afflicted.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

The data for delays is gathered in the London Underground Performance Almanac. Urbs examined the LCH for each line for April 2014 to March 2015.

The Central Line was by far the worst performer with an average 410,000 lost hours per period. That’s 29% higher than the next worse in the list, the Jubilee Line.

Tube LCH League Table

The best performance was the Waterloo and City Line, but as it travels only between 2 stations, Waterloo and Bank, that should be expected. The best performance by a major tube line was the Bakerloo Line.

Looking at the record over the course of the year it is possible to see that the Central Line’s performance is distorted by huge spikes in lost customer hours in April/May and August/September. This is largely due to industrial action.

Tubes lines delays 2014-15

Looking back over 10 years reveals why the Northern earned the nickname the misery line and how the Piccadilly line also had big problems. The network performance is better than a decade ago but those two lines have seen particular improvement.

Tube LCH 10 years

While most lines have steadily reduced levels of disruption the Jubilee and the Central lines have struggled to improve performance at the same rate.

Source data

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest