Cycle hires hit a record monthly high

Santander bike Chris Warham shutterstock_307029647-2

Photo: Chris Warham | Shutterstock

July 2016 was the most successful month for Santander Cycle hire since the bike-sharing scheme was first introduced in 2010.

A record 1.18 million bikes were hired across London last month, an average of 38,000 hires a for each day of the month.  The data from Transport for London shows that on three days, 19th, 30th and 31st of July there were more than 46,000 hires. The average hire time was 23 minutes.

The monthly total beats the previous record for July 2014 by 5,200.  Summer months always prove the most popular times and monthly hires were also over one million in May and just under in June.  The number of hires in January and February this year was around half the July total.

The city bike scheme was introduced on 30th July 2010. In the first two days 12,000 bikes were hired and in the first month 340,000 as the scheme was rolled out across the boroughs and the docking stations became a familiar sight on the streets.

The data shows that the most popular day in the scheme’s six-year existence was 9th July last year when 73,000 bikes were hired.  On the 6th August that year the second highest total was recorded of 64,000.

Mainline stations are the popular hire points, as previously reported by Urbs, as commuters arriving from outside London and make their way to work in the morning and afternoon rush hours.

But the hire data at major landmarks and parks also suggests that tourists may be the biggest users of the bikes, with routes across Hyde Park among the most popular. The data shows that weekends see the largest usage and the most popular weekday for hire is a Thursday.

The bike sharing scheme was introduced by Boris Johnson when he was Mayor and the bicycles  became known as Boris bikes despite a sponsorship deal with Barclays.  Santander took over sponsorship of the scheme last year, but the bikes have not gone on to be re-named Sadiq cycles.

Source data

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Thousands forced to stand as train overcrowding worsens

© Olilee2 | Dreamstime.com - Train At Clapham Junction Photo-2

Photo: © Olilee2 | Dreamstime.com

Around a quarter of the 563,000 people who arrive at London’s main rail terminals each weekday morning on their commute to work have to stand for their journey. That’s 139,000 people each day who don’t get a seat in exchange for their ticket.

The data was released by the Department of Transport and gathered by the train operators in autumn 2014. It shows that the number of people standing on trains in the morning rush hour has gone up by more than 15% since autumn 2013.

Of the 139,000 people who are forced to stand 84,000 of them arrive in London in the peak hour 08.00 to 08.59. The numbers are better on the way home. Only 78,000 are standing during the evening peak period as journeys home from work are more staggered than arrival times.

Paddington Station has the highest rates of overcrowding on arriving trains each weekday morning. And the train operator with the worst rates is First Great Western.

Train overcrowding is measure in a statistic called Passengers in Excess of Capacity (PiXC). This shows the proportion of standard class passengers in excess of the capacity of the service at its busiest point.

Train overcrowding London

The rate at Paddington in the morning rush hour is 13.5%. Trains arriving at Blackfriars and Moorgate are 10.6% over capacity, and the rate of overcrowding has increased at all London’s main train terminals except Victoria and Euston since 2013. The largest increase in the over capacity rate was at Moorgate.

train overcrowding london rise

The average rate of overcrowding for all trains at London terminals in the morning rush hour is 5.4% and slightly lower at 4.1% if morning and evening are counted together. This is directly in line with a 4.2% increase in passenger journeys between autumn 2013 and 2014. Much of the increase in is due to the improvement in the economy which has resulted in demand returning to pre-recession levels due to a growth in employment in central London.  Outside London, Manchester is the city with the worst rates.

Train overcrowding national

 

The one service that emerges with a good statistical record from these rather grim figures is London Overground. It has no over capacity rates on morning or evening services, but many of its trains have fewer seats and more standing areas, increasing their capacity but not necessarily the comfort of the passengers. It has the highest proportion of passengers standing of any train operator but they are all within the train capacity limit.

Source data

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Tube Delays: Piccadilly Line

Tube escalatorSignal problems are the biggest cause of disruption on the Piccadilly line.

Staff issues, including industrial action and problems with the train fleet are the other significant issues.

Delays are measured by what TfL call Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

 

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 205,014 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Piccadilly Line.

LCH Piccadilly

The Piccadilly ranks in 4th place for the worst record on the network, but it has improved considerably in the past 10 years. It has reduced Lost Customer Hours by 69% in the pas 3 years compared to 2003/06.

Source data

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Tube Delays: Northern Line

commuters tube escalatorThe Northern Line, formerly known as the misery line, has seen the best rate of improvement over the past decade in reducing the level of delays.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 139,252 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Northern line.

LCH NOrthern

Comparing its recent performance with the average for 2003/06 shows a reduction in LCH of 76%, the best record on the network.

The line has one of the highest proportions of disruption caused by passengers. This accounted for 27% of the delays in 2014/15 compared to 17% across the network.

Delays caused by what TfL calls “customers and public action” include commuters taking ill, items dropped on the track and people jumping in front of trains. Documents from TfL show that more than 20 people a year kill themselves on the Underground.

Source data

See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

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Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

tube train interiorIf you are stuck on a platform waiting for a train or stranded in a tunnel aboard one Tube disruptions are frustrating, particularly when you are commuting and on a tight schedule. But how bad is your line?

At Urbs we have been looking at the reasons for Tube delays and the record for individual lines over the most recent 12-month period. So if you are asking yourself, “Why does this always happen to me?” Urbs has drawn up the Lost Hours League so you can check whether your line has been particularly afflicted.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

The data for delays is gathered in the London Underground Performance Almanac. Urbs examined the LCH for each line for April 2014 to March 2015.

The Central Line was by far the worst performer with an average 410,000 lost hours per period. That’s 29% higher than the next worse in the list, the Jubilee Line.

Tube LCH League Table

The best performance was the Waterloo and City Line, but as it travels only between 2 stations, Waterloo and Bank, that should be expected. The best performance by a major tube line was the Bakerloo Line.

Looking at the record over the course of the year it is possible to see that the Central Line’s performance is distorted by huge spikes in lost customer hours in April/May and August/September. This is largely due to industrial action.

Tubes lines delays 2014-15

Looking back over 10 years reveals why the Northern earned the nickname the misery line and how the Piccadilly line also had big problems. The network performance is better than a decade ago but those two lines have seen particular improvement.

Tube LCH 10 years

While most lines have steadily reduced levels of disruption the Jubilee and the Central lines have struggled to improve performance at the same rate.

Source data

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

How TfL may be key to success for Apple Pay in the UK

Oyster Reader Tom Page Wikimedia commonsApple Pay arrived in the UK this week and one measure of its success will be how it performs on the London transport network.

Apple Pay allows people to use their iPhones in the same way as a contactless card by setting up payment details in an app on the device and touching it on the card reader.

London is the contactless capital of the country accounting for 38% of all transactions according to the payment services company Worldpay. Since it adopted contactless payments alongside the Oyster card across the network in September last year Transport for London has been a key driver in the rapid rise of contactless payment.

There are about 1.2 million contactless transactions on the transport network each weekday according to Shashi Verma, TfL’s Director of Customer Experience.

Analysis of contactless usage by the UK Card Association, the trade body for the card payment industry,  in December found that TfL were the source of 11% of all contactless usage in the country. Supermarkets, coffee shops, bars and takeaways are the other big users.

Early reports on Apple Pay indicated that some people were finding it slower to open the gates on the Underground than using a credit/debit card or an Oyster.

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TfL warned customers to make sure that their phone was charged to ensure they would be able to touch out at the end of their journey as Apple Pay will not work if the device is out of power.

Samsung and Google are looking at their own payment methods so paying by phone may soon become commonplace.

From September this year the limit on contactless transactions will increase from £20 to £30, so the relentless rise of cash free lifestyle is likely to grow, with London at the forefront of the change.

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Long distance commuters could fill Albert Hall 13 times

london commuters70,000 people working in London are long distance commuters coming from outside the neighbouring regions of the East and South East. That’s enough people to fill the Albert Hall 13 times.

The London workforce consists of 4.7 million people. Data from the Office for National Statistics for where people live and where people work shows that around 3.8 million of them are residents. That leaves 880,000, or 19% of the workforce commuting to the city each day. And the proportion of commuters in the central London workforce is even higher at 25%.

Urbs looked at the data to see where commuters originated. The vast majority are making the daily journey from neighbouring regions of East and South East England but the rest are spending hours in a car, train or perhaps even flying to London for work. Long distance commuters include 5,000 people from Wales and Scotland and 3,000 from the North East of England.

Long distance commuters

But this is not just a story of one-way traffic. Thousands of Londoners take a reverse commute out of the city. 266,000 of them work across the South East. Although 363,000 people come in from the East of England only 10,000 go back the other way to work. 47,000 Londoners head further afield and commute to jobs across the country. A further 7,000 work overseas but remain resident in the capital.

Source data

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Jobs concentrated in just 5 of London’s 33 boroughs

 

Where 22,000 cars were stolen in the capital last year

dreamstime_s_27170312Wandsworth is the car crime capital coming top of the list of the 32 boroughs where a total of 22,000 cars were stolen last year.  Wandsworth wins the accolade only narrowly as car theft is spread quite evenly across the city and only 5 boroughs have fewer than 500 cars stolen. In comparison, cycle theft is far more focused on central areas, perhaps reflecting  a higher number of inner city cyclists and where commuters leave their bikes for the day.

Data from the Metropolitan Police for the 12 months to March 2015 shows that car theft went up by 8% on the previous 12 months. 1,052 cars were taken in Wandsworth, and Newham was just 5 cars behind. But, as our map shows, the pattern of theft was quite evenly spread with a few more dark areas in the east than west.

Car theft

Lowest levels were in the south west but the safest place to park a car was Harrow, with just 195 taken in the period.

Bike theft is focused on the centre of the city. 17,300 cycles were stolen in the 12 months to March 2015, a fall of 7%.  Westminster was the most likely place to lose you bike, with 1,296 taken followed by Hackney with 1,282 stolen cycles. These 2 boroughs, plus Camden, Islington, Tower Hamlets, Southwark and Lambeth form a central ring that accounted for nearly half the cycle thefts.

Bike theft

After these areas the most worrying place to park your bike in a rack were the western boroughs of Wandsworth, Kensington and Chelsea, and Hammersmith and Fulham.

The outlying boroughs of Havering and Bexley saw the lowest bike theft figures.

Source data

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Tourists biggest users of Boris Bikes

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