Tube Delays: Waterloo and City Line

Tube stationThe Waterloo and City Line connects Waterloo railway station with Bank in the City of London. With two stations and no stops in between, it is the most efficient line on the network in terms of time lost through disruption.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

Data in the London Underground Performance Almanac for the last full year shows there was an average of 12,314 Lost Customer Hours per period on the Waterloo and City Line. This is the best performance on the network.

LCH Waterloo City

As the chart shows, with few other issues to contend with, isolated strike action is responsible for a very high proportion of the lost hours.

The Waterloo and City Line is the shortest line travelling 1.47 miles in 4 minutes. It carries fewer passengers than any other Tube line. It was known by its passengers as “The Drain”, possible due to the seepage of water into the tunnels.

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See also

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

Central Line leads the lost hours league table of your Tube delays

tube train interiorIf you are stuck on a platform waiting for a train or stranded in a tunnel aboard one Tube disruptions are frustrating, particularly when you are commuting and on a tight schedule. But how bad is your line?

At Urbs we have been looking at the reasons for Tube delays and the record for individual lines over the most recent 12-month period. So if you are asking yourself, “Why does this always happen to me?” Urbs has drawn up the Lost Hours League so you can check whether your line has been particularly afflicted.

Transport for London measures delays in what it calls Lost Customer Hours (LCH). These are calculated by multiplying the delays in minutes by the number of passengers. TfL records all delays over 2 minutes. It uses the financial year from April to March and splits the year in 13 equal periods for performance measurement.

The data for delays is gathered in the London Underground Performance Almanac. Urbs examined the LCH for each line for April 2014 to March 2015.

The Central Line was by far the worst performer with an average 410,000 lost hours per period. That’s 29% higher than the next worse in the list, the Jubilee Line.

Tube LCH League Table

The best performance was the Waterloo and City Line, but as it travels only between 2 stations, Waterloo and Bank, that should be expected. The best performance by a major tube line was the Bakerloo Line.

Looking at the record over the course of the year it is possible to see that the Central Line’s performance is distorted by huge spikes in lost customer hours in April/May and August/September. This is largely due to industrial action.

Tubes lines delays 2014-15

Looking back over 10 years reveals why the Northern earned the nickname the misery line and how the Piccadilly line also had big problems. The network performance is better than a decade ago but those two lines have seen particular improvement.

Tube LCH 10 years

While most lines have steadily reduced levels of disruption the Jubilee and the Central lines have struggled to improve performance at the same rate.

Source data

Strikes are a commuting disaster, but what delays your daily Tube journey?

Passenger data reveals busiest stations where Tube strike will hit hardest

 

Nearly half UK’s HIV patients are living in London

HIV test

Just under half the people in the UK living with HIV are in London.  The latest data from Public Health England shows that of the 68,664 people who were diagnosed as HIV positive, 31,393 were living in the capital.

The prevelence of HIV in the population of England is 2.14 people per 1000.  In London it is 5.7.  A borough-level breakdown of the numbers for 2013 shows that Lambeth and Southwark have the highest rates by some margin.  There are 3,342 people in Lambeth being treated and 2,692 in Southwark.

The proportion for the City represents just 57 patients. The only boroughs where patient rates are below the England average are Havering and Kingston.

HIV map

The data is based on the number of people aged 15-59 living with a diagnosed HIV infection who are resident in a local authority area and who were seen for HIV care at an NHS site.

HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.  It weakens a person’s immune system, damaging the ability to fight off diseases.  The virus was first diagnosed in 1982. It is treated with drugs that stop the virus reproducing but do not cure the infection.  Patients with HIV need continuing treatment, which is now so effective that those diagnosed are seeing normal life expectancy.

Source data

See also:

Sexual infection map shows problems for Lambeth and Southwark

For more information on living with HIV see Terrence Higgins Trust

London “most influential” global city

city towersLondon is the most influential city in the world thanks to its pre-eminence as a global financial capital and its location, according to business publisher Forbes.

While the United Kingdom is described as a “second-rate power” the capital leads the list for global influence judged by 8 criteria.  Researchers ranked cities according to the amount of foreign direct investment they have attracted, the concentration of corporate headquarters, number of business niches they dominate,  ease of air travel to other global cities, strength of services like legal and accountancy, financial services, technology and media power, and racial diversity.

The top five cities were:

  1. London
  2. New York
  3. Paris
  4. Singapore
  5. Tokyo

Location plays an important role in London’s ranking. Forbes says that being outside the US and the eurozone keeps it away from, what it called, “unfriendly regulators”. It has the second best air connections in the world, beaten only by Dubai. And it has a time-zone advantage over American in doing business with Asia.

History and tradition play a part too. Forbes says that London is the birthplace of the cultural, legal and business practices that define capitalism.  As the home of the English language it boasts a powerful position in media and advertising.  London has also become Europe’s leading tech start up city

New York came second in the Forbes list though in separate rankings for economic power and as a smart city, both reported by Urbs, it outperformed London.  The top two were some way ahead of third place Paris in all criteria. Singapore was the leading Asian city outperforming the mega cities of China and Japan. Dubai is the only city in the Middle East to make the top 10, thanks, says Forbes, to its globalisation strategy and a population diversity that has made it the crossroads of the world.

The size of the cities was of less importance. Of the top 10 on the list only 3, New York, Tokyo and Beijing, are ranked in the top 10 of the world’s most populous cities.  The cities of the so-called BRIC nations are becoming more important and Beijing, Hong Kong and Shanghai are all in the top 20. Poor infrastructure means it will be some time before Brazil and India break into the top flight of these rankings, says Forbes.

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