Most Londoners are within a 15 minute car journey of hospital

© Slawekkozaks | Dreamstime.com - Entrance Accident & Emergency Department Royal London Hospital Photo-2

Photo: © Slawekkozaks | Dreamstime.com

The area near Hampton Court Palace is a fine riverside location to live, but it’s not so good if you need to drive to a hospital.

The Hampton neighbourhood is identified in government statistics as the place with the longest average journey time by car to get to a hospital in London.  The average journey for the 826 residents of this area is 28 minutes, almost double the London average.

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Google Maps, contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right 2013

Outer London boroughs like Richmond, Havering and Barking and Dagenham all have longer average journey times than central areas.  The average journey by car to hospital for residents in these areas is 17 minutes. In Hammersmith and Fulham and the City of London it is just 11 minutes.

The added factor for Richmond is that there is no hospital in the borough. The nearest are in Kingston or Hammersmith.

A comparison of the 4,600 local neighbourhoods, or LSOA, as they are referred in statistical studies reveals fairly uniform journey times across London for a car journey to hospital.

Car journey to hoptial

But if you are without a car and relying on public transport or walking to visit a sick relative or friend then your journey is more of a postcode lottery.  The average time in London is 28 minutes.  It’s a fraction of that in the City, but in the Rainham and Wennington areas of Havering the journey takes nearly an hour.

Source data

See also

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Fewer drivers caught on their mobile while mobile

Bishopsgate-2

The number of people caught using a mobile phone while driving has fallen to levels last seen in 2007. Last year 22,876 drivers in London were caught using a mobile device while at the wheel, that’s more than 60 people every day.

As the popularity of mobile phones has grown over the past 10 years so has the number of offences. In 2007 there were 22,500 offences. This grew rapidly in the following 3 years, reaching a peak of more than 36,000 offences in 2010, according to figures from the Metropolitan Police.

Since then the numbers have been falling. Last year there was a reduction of nearly 18% compared to 2013, and the figures for the first 7 months of this year suggest a further fall is on the cards.

using mobile while driving

One area remains stubbornly static however – the 60 or so people every year who are caught using a mobile while supervising a learner driver. This is also an offence and can result in the same penalty of a £100 fine and 3 penalty points on your driving licence.

Source data

See also

London leads the way in declining car use but the East is bucking the trend

Limehouse Link is the ultimate trap for speeding drivers

Police identify the most ignored red light with 1,500 drivers caught on camera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where 22,000 cars were stolen in the capital last year

dreamstime_s_27170312Wandsworth is the car crime capital coming top of the list of the 32 boroughs where a total of 22,000 cars were stolen last year.  Wandsworth wins the accolade only narrowly as car theft is spread quite evenly across the city and only 5 boroughs have fewer than 500 cars stolen. In comparison, cycle theft is far more focused on central areas, perhaps reflecting  a higher number of inner city cyclists and where commuters leave their bikes for the day.

Data from the Metropolitan Police for the 12 months to March 2015 shows that car theft went up by 8% on the previous 12 months. 1,052 cars were taken in Wandsworth, and Newham was just 5 cars behind. But, as our map shows, the pattern of theft was quite evenly spread with a few more dark areas in the east than west.

Car theft

Lowest levels were in the south west but the safest place to park a car was Harrow, with just 195 taken in the period.

Bike theft is focused on the centre of the city. 17,300 cycles were stolen in the 12 months to March 2015, a fall of 7%.  Westminster was the most likely place to lose you bike, with 1,296 taken followed by Hackney with 1,282 stolen cycles. These 2 boroughs, plus Camden, Islington, Tower Hamlets, Southwark and Lambeth form a central ring that accounted for nearly half the cycle thefts.

Bike theft

After these areas the most worrying place to park your bike in a rack were the western boroughs of Wandsworth, Kensington and Chelsea, and Hammersmith and Fulham.

The outlying boroughs of Havering and Bexley saw the lowest bike theft figures.

Source data

See also:

Tourists biggest users of Boris Bikes

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