Road deaths and serious injuries down but pedestrians remain most at risk

pedestrian childFewer people were killed or seriously injured on the capital’s roads in the past 12 months.

According to data from Transport for London 2,167 people were killed or seriously injured in 2014, a 7% drop on 2013 and the lowest number since the current form of record keeping began in 1986.

Overall casualties figure that include minor injuries were up by 13% year-on-year with 30,785 people hurt in nearly 26,000 accidents. 38% of those injured were travelling in a car.

Pedestrians remain the most at risk of being killed on the road in London. Of the 127 people fatally injured, 64 were on foot and 104 were what TfL refers to as the most vulnerable groups – pedestrians, motor cyclists and cyclists.

Fatalities and Casualties on London’s Roads
Killed Serious Injury
Pedestrian 64 715
Cyclist 13 419
Motorbike/Scooter 27 499
Car 19 297
Van/Lorry 2 19
Taxi/Private Hire 0 13
Bus/Coach 0 71
Other 2 7

TfL’s current target for 2020 is to reduce deaths and serious injury by 50% from the average rate seen between 2005-09. Rates are currently 40% lower, and for children the 50% target has been achieved.

However those under 15 remain the most vulnerable pedestrians. 5,613 people on foot suffered some form of injury in a road accident in 2014. More than 1,000 of them were children.

Injuries to cyclists were up, but so is the popularity of cycling. Deaths and serious injuries rose by 3% on the 2005-09 average and minor injuries were up by 73%. Since 2005 the number of journeys taken by bike has risen by 92%, says TfL.

Men suffered 78% of cycling injuries, but they make three quarters of all cycle journeys, according to TfL. There was an even starker gender imbalance for motorbikes and scooters. Men take 87% of the journeys and suffered 93% of the injuries.

In comparison, injury rates for pedestrians and people in cars were split 54/46 male and female.

Source data

See also

Availability of public transport below average in all outer boroughs