London teen pregnancy rate lowest but more end in abortion

hLondon has a lower level of teenage pregnancy than the rest of England but a higher proportion of those pregnancies end in abortion.

Teenage pregnancy is on a downward trend for both 15-17 year-olds and the 13-15 age group. Urbs analysis of the data gathered by the Office for National Statistics shows that for 15-17 year olds it went down by 46% from 2009 to 2013, and by 40% for the younger group. The rates for London are a below the national average, and declining at the same rate.

Pregnancy 15-17Pregnancy 13-15The abortion rate for 13-15 year-olds is 69% in London compared to 61% nationally.  In the older group the difference is more marked, 62% in London, which is about a fifth higher than the average for England.

Across London the conception rate varies widely.

For 15-17 year-olds in Barnet it is 13 per 1000. In Barking and Dagenham it is 3 times higher.  The rate of abortion in Barnet is 69% and in Barking and Dagenham it is 59%.  The data for 2011-13 suggests that boroughs with the higher pregnancy rates tend to have a lower proportion ending in abortion.

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The data behind failing ambulance response times

hThe London Ambulance Service responded to more than a million calls last year.  That works out at 2740 calls per day or 114 calls per hour.

Some areas of the capital are much busier than others. Data analysis by Urbs shows that the London wide borough average of calls per 1000 residents is 121. It is much higher in central London.

In the City of London it is 778 per thousand residents, reflecting the small numbers of residents compared to the large number of people working and socialising in the area. The figures for Westminster, Camden and Islington are also high on this measure. But some more residential outer London boroughs also have high call out rates. Barking and Dagenham, and Hilingdon are above the London average.

The service employs 4500 staff at 70 stations. It is under considerable pressure and currently failing to meet the national response time targets.  It should get to 75% of the immediately life-threatening incidents within 8 minutes.  Figures from the service for the six months to January this year show the monthly average of 62% or lower.  The head of the service, Ann Radmore, resigned in January.  Response times for February and March are yet to be published.

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Latest response times

Size matters – and it depends where you live

Obese copyLondon has a lower rate of adult obesity than any other region of England but there are large variations across the capital. 19.6% of Londoners are obese compared to the average for England of 23%. That goes up to a little over 25% in Yorkshire, Humberside and the North East.

But levels are even higher in some London boroughs as the map below shows.  Barking and Dagenham has 32% obesity and City of London 31%. That’s nearly three times the level in Kensington and Chelsea with 11.2%. Richmond also scores well with just 12.1% of residents classified as obese. It is double that in Hillingdon, Enfield, Bexley and Lewisham.

The data is based upon the Health Survey for England, the Sport England Active Person Survey and BMI information from the Understanding Society study for Health England.

Obesity is measured using the Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI is calculated by dividing your weight in kilograms by your height in meters. The NHS’s easy calculator is here. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal, healthy weight. Below 18.5 is underweight, above 25 is overweight and 30 and above is obese.

Londoners also score well when looking at that data for people at a normal, healthy weight. In London it’s 41% compared to 35% of people across England. And in Kensington and Chelsea, Richmond, and Hammersmith and Fulham 50% of people or more are in this category.

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Breast cancer screening lag

Breast cancer scan copyBreast cancer screening rates for London remain below the national average in England for the fifth year in a row. Data analysis by Urbs shows that 68.9% of eligible women aged 53-70 were screened last year. But that’s 9% below the rate for England as a whole.

London has managed to close the gap over the past five years. In 2007-08 London lagged 16% behind the national average.

The data is collected at borough level and shows a clear division in the capital between the performance of inner and outer London. The four best performing boroughs of Havering, Bexley, Bromley, Harrow all beat the average rate for England. The nine worse performing boroughs were all inner city. Islington came bottom, 24% below national average, followed by Kensington and Chelsea, 22% lower.

Islington’s performance has dropped year-on-year by 15%. During the same period the number of eligible women fell by 2%. Lewisham, Sutton, Croydon, Merton and Kingston also saw a drop in their year-on-year figures but all saw some increase in the numbers of eligible women.

671,463 women in London were eligible for breast cancer screening in 2014. Women aged 50-70 are offered the service as they are seen as the highest risk group who can benefit most through screening.

During the process a radiographer creates a special kind of X-ray called a mammogram, where an image of the breast is created by passing very low dose x-rays through the breast tissue.

In a study in 2011 Cancer Research UK estimated that screening saves the lives of approximately 1,300 women each year.

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More information about breast cancer here.

 

Childhood obesity highest in London

Obesity_London_ 2The rate of obesity in young people aged 10-19 is 40 per cent higher in London than the rest of England. While London enjoys a good record compared to the national average in all adult age groups the numbers for youngsters suggest future health problems for London families.

Across England 3.1% of youngsters are classified as obese. But in London that figure jumps to 5.3%. In all other age groups London levels are below the national average.

Adult Obesity by age

The data is based upon the Health Survey for England, the Sport England Active Person Survey and BMI information from the Understanding Society study for Health England.

Obesity is measured using the Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI is calculated by dividing your weight in kilograms by your height in meters. The NHS’s easy calculator is here.  A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal, healthy weight. Below 18.5 is underweight, above 25 is overweight and 30 and above is obese.

Obesity is broken down into three categories – severely obese, morbidly obese and super obesity. All the children in London are in the first category. Across England there are a small number of teenagers in the other two.

Obesity is linked to a number of health problems, including type-2 diabetes and heart disease.

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