East London likely focal point for PM’s English tuition for Muslim women

flag waving-2Almost 40% of the Muslim women who speak little or no English, targeted by David Cameron for language lessons, are living in London.

East London boroughs will need to be a particular focal point of the PM’s £20 million language tuition fund as around a third of Muslim women in Tower Hamlets and Hackney have English difficulties. Across the capital 17% of Muslim women speak little or no English.  They far outnumber the men.

Data from the 2011 census, which asked people about their religion and proficiency in English, shows that there are nearly 100,000 Muslims in London who say that their English is poor.  63% of them are women, the same proportion as for England.

A further 19,000 speak no English at all.  75% or 14,000 are women.  The majority are over 45.

No English Muslims

These figures also show that more than 2,000 of the non-English speaking Muslims are school-age children between 3 and 15.

Urbs looked at the data at borough level for Muslim women who are unable to speak any English. They are concentrated in East London in Tower Hamlets and Newham.

No English map

The Prime Minister has been criticised for singling out Muslim women in his pronouncement on the need for more English tuition to help combat extremism. Many people pointed out that his government previously cut the budget for English tuition for migrants.  While Muslim women are the largest group, people of other faiths also lack a command of English.

The census data shows that the second biggest faith group for non English speakers is Christians. More than 12,000 do not speak English, quite evenly divided between men and women. There are also more than 5,000 Hindus, largely women, who do not speak English.

non Englsih all faiths

The latest data for all these figures comes from 2011, since when there has been a large influx of people coming to work in the UK from Central and Southern Europe.  Many have limited ability in English.

The PM chose to target Muslim women in linking command of English with combating extremist views, but the broader problem of a lack of language skill and its impact upon society and the workforce may be a bigger, multi-faith or no faith problem.

Source data

See also

Our multi-lingual city – English second language for half of primary pupils

London is more diverse than the UN or Fifa

Poles and Pakistanis help shape the multi-cultural make up of the city

What National Insurance really tells us about London’s overseas workforce

 

 

Economic growth carries risk for culture and creativity, says report

AstroStar shutterstock_251095102-2

Photo: AstroStar ┃Shutterstock.com

The economic success of London may be coming at a cost to the culture and creativity of the city. This is the warning in a report by the World Cities Culture Forum, a network of 27 cities, including London, that share research to help develop policy.

In its 2015 report, published to coincide with a summit meeting in London, it says that the capital’s growth poses significant challenges with pressure on housing and transport, and many people priced out of the city centre.

As reported by Urbs, the affordability of housing means younger people, in particular, find trouble finding a place to live, with many moving back in with parents after finishing higher education.

The report observes that the rising cost of living makes it very difficult for those working in the creative industries to find not only a home but also a space to work. It says, “For some years, places like London and New York have been replacing studios with apartments, artists with bankers. Estimates suggest that in the next four years, London will lose around 30% of its current artists’ workspace.”

The forum says that the emergence of ‘tech city’ in East London in the 1990s demonstrated the value of low cost workspace. Without it cities are prevented form nurturing radical and provocative ideas.

According to data analysis by the WCCF, London has the highest proportion of people working in the creative industries of any of its 27 city members. It says that 16.2% of the London workforce is in the creative industries, according to data from the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

creative industries employment

Ricky Burdett, Professor of Urban Studies at the LSE says, “The contribution of London’s creative industries to national productivity 
and its ability to attract young and global workforce are central to its survival as a world city.”


Surveys have shown that people globally rate London highly as a city to come to work, as previously reported by Urbs. The cultural and creative life of the city plays a part in their decision.

The report says that while some cities are now making low cost work space a priority they are failing to solve the problem of affordable housing for their artists, producers and young creative talent.

London data

World Cities Culture Forum 2015 report

See also

Where in the world would you like to work?

London leads Europe but lags behind US as tech start up base, says survey

 

 

Museums much searched on Google are found by millions from overseas, says survey

Science Museum

London’s Science Museum…much searched, often found

Measuring popularity by the number of Google searches has become a pretty regular metric. A quick glance at Google Trends top chart will tell you that Pharrell Williams is more popular than Benedict Cumberbatch, more of us want to make chocolate cake than carrot cake, and the thing we most want to know how to do is to draw.

The latest top 5 in the Google league tells us that museums and galleries in London are the most searched in the world. According to London & Partners, the Mayor’s official promotional company, the Google museum search list has London institutions at 1,2, and 3.

  1. Science Museum, London
  2. Natural History Museum, London
  3. British Museum, London
  4. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  5. Smithsonian Museum, Washington DC

London and Partners caution that Google’s methodology means that the results may vary day to day and the Science Museum comes top “on average”.

Perhaps more telling therefore is not how many people search the museum name on Google but how many people come to visit.

According to London and Partners a visitor survey conducted through 15,000 face to face interviews at 13 museums and galleries by research company Morris Hargreaves McIntyre concluded that they received 17.9 million overseas visitors in 2014 and 2015 out of a total visitor number of 31.5 million. That’s 57% of visitors, and an increase of 19% over the past 4 years.

French and American tourists were the most frequent, in line with figures for London visitor numbers, as reported by Urbs. Along with people from Italy, Spain and Germany they accounted for 9.7 million of the 17.9 million overseas museum visitors, according to the survey.

Source data

See also

Good news for tourists and Londoners as city dominates for visitor attractions

French biggest group of visitors but Americans spend most

London ranked as top global city destination

Where the arts-loving Londoners live – not in Newham

 

 

 

 

 

 

Religious Faith in London: Sikhs

Just over 1% of Londoners identify themselves as Sikhs, that’s around 100,000 people.

They are heavily concentrated in Hillingdon and Hounslow with significant numbers in Ealing as well. The Sikh community is highly focused on these 3 West London boroughs and there are no Sikhs registered as living in neighbouring  Hammersmith and Fulham.

On the opposite side of London Redbridge and Barking and Dagenham also have established Sikh communities.

Religions sikhs

The proportion of Sikhs in the capital has been largely unchanged for the past 10 years, according to the National Office for Statistics. In the same time there has been a growth in the number of people who say they have no belief but, as reported by Urbs, London is still the most religious region of Britain.

Source data

See also

Religious Faith in London: Christians

Religious Faith in London: Muslims

Religious Faith in London: Hindus

Religious Faith in London: Jews

Religious Faith in London: Buddhists

Religious Faith in London: Non-believers

Religious Faith in London: Jews

The Jewish community is long established in North London with the largest proportion in Barnet and sizeable numbers in the neighbouring boroughs of Harrow and Camden, plus the Stamford Hill area of Hackney.

There are a little over 170,000 Jews in London, that’s around 2% of the population.

Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that proportion of Jews in the population has been stable for the past 10 years. In the same time there has been a growth in the number of people who say they have no belief but, as reported by Urbs, London is still the most religious region of Britain.

Religions Jews

Source data

See also

Religious Faith in London: Christians

Religious Faith in London: Muslims

Religious Faith in London: Hindus

Religious Faith in London: Sikhs

Religious Faith in London: Buddhists

Religious Faith in London: Non-believers

 

Religious Faith in London: Hindus

5% of Londoners, that’s 427,000 people, describe themselves as Hindu and they are largely concentrated in North West London boroughs. The highest proportion is in Harrow. These areas are home to the largest proportion of Indian-born Londoners.

Redbridge in the east of the city also has a significant proportion. Lambeth has the lowest rate of Hindus in the population.

According to figures from the Office for National Statistics, the number of Hindus in London has remained more or less stable over the past 10 years.  While the number of people with no faith has increased London still remains the most religious region of Britain, as reported by Urbs.

Religion Hindu

Source data

See also

Religious Faith in London: Christians

Religious Faith in London: Muslims

Religious Faith in London: Jews

Religious Faith in London: Sikhs

Religious Faith in London: Buddhists

Religious Faith in London: Non-believers

 

 

Why the Mayor thinks busking should be music to our ears

2015-07-18 14.19.56-1-2For some, busking is a noisy nuisance that obstructs the pavements. For others it is an essential part of the vibrancy of London. The Mayor and the GLA are on a mission to increase busking but some boroughs seem unconvinced and it remains a contentious issue open to local rules and by-laws.

City Hall’s promotion of busking steps up a gear throughout the next few weeks with the Busk in London festival until August 8th. It kicked off on Saturday 18th July, which was National Busking Day, if you didn’t know. In the coming weeks a large number of performers will showcase their talents in high profile locations like Trafalgar Square.

But away from festival time the rules on busking and its public acceptability are complex. London has a number of ‘official’ busking pitches, though the GLA dislikes using the term official as it points out that busking is legal on any public land in the UK.

The GLA told Urbs that there are currently 70 established pitches which include 39 in the London Underground, 14 on the Southbank, 11 around Covent Garden, 4 in Hillingdon Town Centre, 1 at One New Change Shopping Centre near St Paul’s and 1 at the O2 Centre on Finchley Road.


See also

Where the arts-loving Londoners live – not in Newham

Good news for tourists and Londoners as city dominates for visitor attractions


For buskers the problems centre on knowing when a location is on public land and whether their act is causing an obstruction or a noise nuisance, when a number of different laws may be used to move them on.

The GLA has tried to combat this by producing a Buskers’ Code to help potential performers choose a pitch and build up a good relationship with local people.

So far just 6 of the 33 boroughs have signed up – Westminster, Islington, Southwark, Hounslow, Kingston and Redbridge.

Camden, known for its music venues, has sought to restrict busking by introducing a license scheme and £1,000 fines for anyone caught busking without one.

Busking is not allowed at all in the City of London. The Corporation sites the Police & Factories (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1916 as the reason why.

The GLA says it is hopes to sign up more boroughs to its code soon and is talking to Network Rail about pitches at the big main railway stations.

It estimates that about 1,000 buskers are regularly performing in London. TfL says that performers at its 39 marked pitches at 25 Tube stations provide 100,000 hours of music for commuters each year.

If the Mayor, Boris Johnson, has his way their be more music and street theatre. In launching the code of conduct and his annual Gigs busking competition for under 25s he said: ”’Busking adds to the capital’s joie de vivre, but in spite of its popularity, buskers have sometimes encountered problems when plying their trade.”

The GLA estimates that music tourism generates £600 million for the London economy each year and that live performances enhance public spaces. And if City Hall gets its way you’ll be seeing a lot more of it.

 

Religious Faith in London: Christians

The Christian population of London has declined to 49% from 61% 10 years ago. This means that a little under 4.2 million people describe themselves as Christian.

London is the only region in the UK where fewer than 50% define themselves as Christian.

Christian in UK

Despite this decline in Christianity London remains the most religious region of the UK when all religions are included, as previously reported by Urbs.

Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that Christians are quite evenly spread throughout the capital. The outer borough of Bexley has the highest proportion. The lowest rate is in Tower Hamlets, which has the highest proportion of Muslims in the capital.

Christian in London

Source data

See also

Religious Faith in London: Muslims

Religous Faith in London: Hindus

Religious Faith in London: Jews

Religious Faith in London: Sikhs

Religious Faith in London: Buddhists

Religious Faith in London: Non-believers

The capital is the most religious region of Britain

 

The capital is the most religious region of Britain

Westminster Abbey interiroLondon is the most religious place in Britain with 75% of the population having some form of belief. But it is the only region of the country where Christians make up less than half of the population.

Across the country an average of 68% of people have religious faith, according to data from the Office of National Statistics. After London, the North West of England is most God-fearing, and the least religious region is Scotland.

Religion none

London’s Christian population currently stands at 49%, down from 61% in 2006. The capital has a higher proportion of people of other faiths. Muslims make up 14% of the population compared to 5% nationally. Other faiths are also more common in the capital.

Religion proportions

While Islam has grown a little in London, from 12% to 14% of the population since 2006, other religions groups – Hindu, Sikh, Jewish, and Buddhist – have remained more or less stable. The biggest change in faith in London is in people losing it.

Religion London

In 2006 16% said that they had no religions belief. In 2014 that had increased to 25%.

Source data

See also

Religous Faith in London: Christians

Religous Faith in London: Muslims

Religious Faith in London: Hindus

Religious Faith in London: Jews

Religious Faith in London: Sikhs

Religious Faith in London: Buddhists

Religious Faith in London: Non-believers

 

 

 

Good news for tourists and Londoners as city dominates for visitor attractions

British Museum - the Uk and London's top visitor attraction

British Museum – the UK and London’s top visitor attraction

Planning a day out, with or without the kids, means being spoilt for choice in London. According to data from the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions, London has most of the top sites in the UK.

But expect a crowd when you get there.  20 of the 31 visitor attractions in the UK that have more than 1 million visitors are in London and that includes 9 of the top 10.

The data for 2014 shows that the venerable British Museum is top once again with 6.7 million annual visitors. The top 5 are:

  1. British Museum
  2. National Gallery 
  3. Southbank Centre
  4. Tate Modern
  5. Natural History Museum

The figures show that Tate Modern, the art gallery housed in the old Bankside power station on the Thames, has seen particularly strong growth in visitors year on year since 2013.  High profile exhibitions like the Matisse show helped push up visitor numbers by 18%.

All the top five have free entrance, though there are charges for some special exhibitions. Museum and gallery spaces outscore simple sightseeing.  The highest position for London’s landmark buildings is St Paul’s Cathedral in 12th place, but it has seen a drop in visitors of 17% since 2013.

The highest placed attraction outside London is the Library of Birmingham, opened in 2013, in 10th place.  The Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh is at 14.  Chester Zoo, with a little over 1.4 million visitors is the top animal attraction and outscores London Zoo with 1.3 million.

The only site in the rankings attracting more than a million people that is outside a city is Stonehenge in Wiltshire.   Stonehenge added a new visitor centre at the end of 2013 and 1.3 millon people trooped through last year.

The Associate of Leading Visitor Attractions includes museums, galleries, historic places and gardens but its list does not include theme parks such as Thorpe Park and  Chessington, just outside London.  Thorpe Park has annual numbers of around 2 million.  Chessington has around 1.5 million thrill-seekers. The capital’s top paid for tourist attraction remains the London Eye with 3.75 million visitors.

Source data