Cycle hires hit a record monthly high

Santander bike Chris Warham shutterstock_307029647-2

Photo: Chris Warham | Shutterstock

July 2016 was the most successful month for Santander Cycle hire since the bike-sharing scheme was first introduced in 2010.

A record 1.18 million bikes were hired across London last month, an average of 38,000 hires a for each day of the month.  The data from Transport for London shows that on three days, 19th, 30th and 31st of July there were more than 46,000 hires. The average hire time was 23 minutes.

The monthly total beats the previous record for July 2014 by 5,200.  Summer months always prove the most popular times and monthly hires were also over one million in May and just under in June.  The number of hires in January and February this year was around half the July total.

The city bike scheme was introduced on 30th July 2010. In the first two days 12,000 bikes were hired and in the first month 340,000 as the scheme was rolled out across the boroughs and the docking stations became a familiar sight on the streets.

The data shows that the most popular day in the scheme’s six-year existence was 9th July last year when 73,000 bikes were hired.  On the 6th August that year the second highest total was recorded of 64,000.

Mainline stations are the popular hire points, as previously reported by Urbs, as commuters arriving from outside London and make their way to work in the morning and afternoon rush hours.

But the hire data at major landmarks and parks also suggests that tourists may be the biggest users of the bikes, with routes across Hyde Park among the most popular. The data shows that weekends see the largest usage and the most popular weekday for hire is a Thursday.

The bike sharing scheme was introduced by Boris Johnson when he was Mayor and the bicycles  became known as Boris bikes despite a sponsorship deal with Barclays.  Santander took over sponsorship of the scheme last year, but the bikes have not gone on to be re-named Sadiq cycles.

Source data

See also

Tourists biggest users of Boris Bikes

Americans back on top as London’s biggest visitors

How London compares for the cost of public transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forget keeping up with the neighbours, survey says we don’t even trust them

Neighbours 1000 Words shutterstock_296519900-1-2

PhotoL 1000 Words ┃Shutterstock.com

Londoners, it appears, don’t trust their neighbours. At least that’s what a survey commissioned by the Government suggests. Less than a third said they could trust the people in their neighbourhood.

This rather depressing finding is one of many from the Government’s annual Community Life Survey, which started 3 years ago. It was set up to assess feelings of community in society. The findings reinforce the widely held belief that the capital can be an unfriendly place. But the bad news for the country is the rest of England seems to be heading that way.

While only 31% of Londoners trust the neighbours, it is 44% in the rest of the country, but there’s been a significant fall in level of trust in the past 3 years.

community trust

While there may not be a great deal of trust, half the Londoners questioned chat with a neightbour at least once a week. The rest of England emerges as friendlier but not as friendly as it was.

community chat

One worrying result for both London and England as a whole is the falling rates of people who have a sense of belonging in the place they live. When this question was asked 3 years ago more than three quarters of people said they felt fairly or very strongly that they belonged in an area. In the most recent results that proportion has dropped to a little over 60%.

community belong

Despite this lack of belonging, some levels of community spirit seem to be holding fast. 57% of those asked in London said they felt people worked together to make their neighbourhood better.

community together

And there are 2 other positives. 83% of Londoners who took part said that they believed in Britain, and that rate has been consistent for 3 years. 84% said their area was one where people of different background could get on well together.

The Community Life Survey is commissioned by the Cabinet Office and carried out annually by a polling company.  In 2014-15 2,000 participants were interviewed.

Source data

See also

The Marmite response to living in the capital

Many in caring professions negative towards LGBT people, says survey

 

How London’s choice of nightlife compares to other cities

dancing-2London is rightly famous for vibrant nightlife but if you want a bar scene Rio’s the place for you, and if you want to shake something then head to Shanghai.

A serious-minded report on the impact of economic growth on culture and the creative industries has thrown up some interesting facts about how London compares with other cities.

It appears that while people in London may like a drink, that’s as nothing compared to the bar scene of some Latin capitals. Madrid has twice the number of drinking establishments of either London or New York. Rio has more than twice the number of Madrid. But the figures really stand out when you look at the number of bars per 100,000 of the population.

Bars per 100k

Our capital does a little better when it comes to restaurants. London has similar number as New York but fewer than Paris. But if you want some choice in eating out then Toyko is then place for you. The Japanese capital has 150,510 restaurants. That’s equivalent to 1 for every 100 people. Depending on the size of the eating places it seems that a fair proportion of Tokyo’s residents could go out to dinner one night.

Restaurants

There’s a bigger clubbing scene is in London than Berlin, but if you’ve got your dancing shoes on then point them to Shanghai which has twice the number of clubs and dance halls as LA.

Clubs

 

London appears to be falling down when it comes to live music. With 245 venues London trails behind New York. The data for London on this is from 2011 and recent reports suggest more venues closing.  Australia emerges in the figures as the place to see live bands and singers. Sydney may be a smaller city but it has nearly matched New York for venues, and Melbourne out performs them all.

Live muisc

The French emerge in the data as the most avid cinema-goers with 30% more cinema admissions in Paris than London. It has more cinema screens too, nearly matching Los Angeles, the home of Hollywood.

cinema

Data sources

World Cities Culture Forum 2015 report

See also

Economic growth carries risk for culture and creativity, says report

Why the Mayor thinks busking should be music to our ears

London losing its thirst for binge drinking

More mums in their early 40s than early 20s in city’s wealthiest areas

Pregnant at work g-stockstudio-2

Photo: g-stockstudio ┃Shuttertock.com

Women giving birth in their early 40s outnumber women giving birth in their early 20s in 8 of London’s most affluent boroughs. In Kensington and Chelsea the ratio is 2:1 in favour of the older mums.

The figures in the latest births data from the Office for National Statistics underlines the long-running trend towards women having children when they are older. Nationally the number of mums in the 35-39 age group exceeded those aged 20-24 for the first time last year, according to the data just released.

But in London that trend is more developed and the numbers of women in their 40s giving birth is growing. Across England and Wales just under half of all births are to women in their 20s. In London it is 38% as more women wait before having children.

London v national birth ages

London mums have an older age profile. The data show that 18% of all the children born in the England and Wales in 2014 were born in London. But only 9% of those born to under 20s were in the capital, while it is home to a quarter of mothers over 35 and more than a third of those over 45.

Across England and Wales as a whole the picture is different and the number of mothers in their early 20s outnumbers those in their 40s by 4:1.  This is the case in some London boroughs too, such as Newham and Barking and Dagenham. But in Richmond, and Kensington and Chelsea the 40-44s have outnumbered the 20-24s for some years and this trend is now emerging in more boroughs, including Camden, City of London, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kingston, Wandsworth and Westminster.

20s v 40s

The affluent nature of these boroughs suggests that professional women trying to balance career with the timing of children may be a key driver of this trend.

Source data

See also

Baby booming Wandsworth is the city’s kiddie capital

Over 50% of London babies have mothers born outside the UK

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

 

Economic growth carries risk for culture and creativity, says report

AstroStar shutterstock_251095102-2

Photo: AstroStar ┃Shutterstock.com

The economic success of London may be coming at a cost to the culture and creativity of the city. This is the warning in a report by the World Cities Culture Forum, a network of 27 cities, including London, that share research to help develop policy.

In its 2015 report, published to coincide with a summit meeting in London, it says that the capital’s growth poses significant challenges with pressure on housing and transport, and many people priced out of the city centre.

As reported by Urbs, the affordability of housing means younger people, in particular, find trouble finding a place to live, with many moving back in with parents after finishing higher education.

The report observes that the rising cost of living makes it very difficult for those working in the creative industries to find not only a home but also a space to work. It says, “For some years, places like London and New York have been replacing studios with apartments, artists with bankers. Estimates suggest that in the next four years, London will lose around 30% of its current artists’ workspace.”

The forum says that the emergence of ‘tech city’ in East London in the 1990s demonstrated the value of low cost workspace. Without it cities are prevented form nurturing radical and provocative ideas.

According to data analysis by the WCCF, London has the highest proportion of people working in the creative industries of any of its 27 city members. It says that 16.2% of the London workforce is in the creative industries, according to data from the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

creative industries employment

Ricky Burdett, Professor of Urban Studies at the LSE says, “The contribution of London’s creative industries to national productivity 
and its ability to attract young and global workforce are central to its survival as a world city.”


Surveys have shown that people globally rate London highly as a city to come to work, as previously reported by Urbs. The cultural and creative life of the city plays a part in their decision.

The report says that while some cities are now making low cost work space a priority they are failing to solve the problem of affordable housing for their artists, producers and young creative talent.

London data

World Cities Culture Forum 2015 report

See also

Where in the world would you like to work?

London leads Europe but lags behind US as tech start up base, says survey

 

 

A prosperity divide and neither rich nor poor seem happy

© Acmanley | Dreamstime.com - London Street Art Photo

Photo: © Acmanley | Dreamstime.com

The people of Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea and Camden are among the wealthiest on average in the UK, but money is not buying them happiness, as they are more miserable than many across the country.

These findings emerge in an index that looks at the combination of wealth and life satisfaction to indicate levels of prosperity. It suggests that 6 London boroughs (Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London) are the most prosperous in the country. But 4 others (Bexley, Greenwich, Brent and Croydon) are in the bottom 10 of 170 areas assessed.

The high prosperity scores for London boroughs are based largely on wealth not well-being. The Legatum Institute, a think tank that says that it is focused on promoting prosperity, put the index together. It used GDP per capita as a measure of wealth and the life satisfaction data collected by the Office for National Statistics.

Residents in Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden and the City of London, enjoy an average income of £133,000. 15 of the top 20 areas in the UK for average earnings, including Tower Hamlets, Hackney, Newham, Lambeth, Southwark, Lewisham, Haringey and Islington, are in London. But the spread of wealth is not uniform across the capital and some boroughs come at the lower end of the table. Redbridge, Waltham Forest, Enfield and Barking and Dagenham have average earnings of £14,300.

What is common to all London boroughs however is the low level of life satisfaction. The happiest place in the UK according the ONS measure is the Outer Hebrides. Out of 170 areas the only London borough to squeeze into the top 50 is Bromley at 49 in the rankings.

Wealthy Hammersmith and Fulham and Kensington and Chelsea are down in the mid 80s and only 6 other boroughs (Ealing, Merton, Sutton, Kingston, Richmond and Hounslow) make it into the top 100.

While residents of Camden and the City of London come top for earnings they are in the bottom 10 when it comes to happiness, along with Croydon and Brent. Haringey and Islington folk also seem to be miserable – 11th from bottom in the life satisfaction rankings.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Pay rates underline gap between rich and poor boroughs

Welcome to the city of the super rich

 

 

Elderly losing out in city with high levels of digital skills

finger on tablet-2A very high proportion of people in  London use the internet but what are they able to do when they are online? 91% of Londoners have at some point accessed the internet according to survey data from the Office for National Statistics, reported by Urbs.  But fewer than that have basic skills it would seem, according to a another survey into digital capability?

The research, commissioned by the charity Go On UK, which aims to improve digital skills in individuals and organisations, shows that Londoners come out on top in the UK,  but 16% would fail to perform 5 basic digital skills.

The charity identified a series of task to define digital skills, from searching for information, to filling out an online form or creating something from online assets.  Those with all 5 are defined as having Basic Digital Skills, those with the first 4 as having Basic Online Skills.

Screen Shot 2015-10-21 at 16.20.43

Graphic: Ipsos for Go On UK

Research company Ipsos carried out face-to-face interviews with 4,167 people nationally, 577 of them in London, to assess skills. 71% nationally possessed all 5 skills; in London it was 84%.

Screen Shot 2015-10-21 at 16.22.10

Map: Ipsos for Go On UK

 

Looking at the survey results at local authority level saw a high point of 90% in the City of London and above average scores of 88% in Kensington and Chelsea, and 86% in Wandsworth. Seven boroughs had rates below 80% with the lowest recorded in Redbridge, 76% and Newham, 73%.

Across the UK, skill levels in older people are much less common but the decline for those over 45 was much steeper in London than the rest of the country.  While skill levels for groups below 44 are almost identical, in the 65+ age category 43% have the basic digital skills but only 38% in London.

One positive difference between London and the rest of the country is the gender gap, which the survey suggests doesn’t exist in the capital.  In the UK as a whole 80% of men and 74% of women had the basic digital skills. In London it was 84% and 83%.

Access to broadband emerged as a key factor as did ownership of digital devices.  London scores well in both these areas; 93% of respondents in London had broadband access and 94% owned a smartphone.

Source data

See also

More than half a million Londoners have never used the internet

London’s smart, but not smart enough

 

More than half a million Londoners have never used the internet

keyboard close upMore than half a million people in London have never used the internet. But London has the lowest proportion of people who are not online of any region of the country.

These findings are based on data gathered by the Office for National Statistics in the Labour Force Survey. More than 300,000 people took part, 27,000 of them in London. They were asked, “When did you last use the internet?”

8.7% of respondents in London said that they have never used the Internet. That’s equivalent to 586,000 people. The average across all regions of the UK is 11.4%, but in Northern Ireland 18.8% have never been online.

The breakdown shows a clear age factor in non-usage. The majority of those over 75 do not use the Internet. Almost a  quarter of the people aged 65-74 are non-users and 16% of those 60-64. Most people under 60 are internet users and everyone in their 20s has been on the internet.

Internet usage age

There are more women than men in the survey who say they never use the internet; 10.8% compared to 6.5% of men. There is also some variation based on ethnic origin. In London a higher than average proportion of respondents from Chinese and Black, African, Caribbean or Black British backgrounds have never used the Internet. Across the UK people of Pakistani and Bangladeshi origin have a lower rate of usage but In London these groups are above average in internet use.

The occupations with the highest level of non-usage are people who work in process, plant and machine operation, followed by those in skilled trades.

People who own their home outright make up a higher proportion of non-users than those with a mortgage or renting.   This may be due to an age factor, as owner-occupiers tend to be older.

Although London as a whole has the lowest regional average there are some areas where the proportion of people who have never been online is higher than the national average. In Haringey it is 13% and in Bexley 14. In contrast only 3% of the population of Lambeth and 2% in Kensington and Chelsea have never been online.

Internet usage

The proportion of Londoners who have never used the internet has come down from 13.9% in 2011 when the ONS started asking this question. As most non-users are elderly people this rate is likely to keep falling as soon the elderly will also be part of a generation to have grown up and worked in a digital world.

Source data

Elderly show wealth divide – 75,000 not claiming pension, more rely on benefits

How TfL may be key to success for Apple Pay in the UK

Search London leads Europe but lags behind US as tech start up base, says survey

 

Anxious, unhappy, dissatisfied with life? Perhaps you live in Hackney or Barking?

despair

How happy are you? Did you feel anxious yesterday? Are you satisfied with life, and does your life feel worthwhile? These are the questions the Office for National Statistics has been asking since 2010 to try to understand the nation’s well-being.

The most recent rankings show that people in Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea are most pleased with their lot in life while those in Barking and Dagenham, Hackney and Lambeth seem to have little to smile about.

The results are based upon a national survey carried out by the ONS that questions around 120,000 people nationally and over 13,000 in London. The responses indicate a greater sense of well-being in south and west London, in line with the GLA’s own well-being index, previously reported by Urbs.

When it comes to satisfaction with life the small resident population of the City of London came out top, closely followed by Kensington. At the other end of the scale the survey respondents in Barking and Dagenham and Lambeth were least satisfied.

ONS Well-being Survey
How satisfied are you with your life?
Most Satisfied Least satisfied
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
Richmond Camden
Southwark Hackney
Merton Greenwich

There was a similar result at the top and bottom of the rankings when it came to whether life felt worthwhile.

ONS Well-being Survey
To what extent do you feel the things you do in your life are worthwhile?
Worthwhile Not worthwhile
Kensington and Chelsea Lambeth
City of London Barking and Dagenham
Hillingdon Hackney
Bexley Camden
Richmond Brent

In terms of happiness the affluent areas of Richmond and Kensington and Chelsea score well once more, and Bromley on the southern outer edge of the capital also has happy residents. Hackney and Barking and Dagenham feature again but at the wrong end of the rankings.

ONS Well-being Survey
How happy did you feel yesterday?
Most happy Least happy
Kensington and Chelsea Hackney
Bromley Barking and Dagenham
Richmond Hammersmith and Fulham
Barnet Waltham Forest
Hounslow Westminster

As well as being unhappy the survey respondents in Hackney and Barking and Dagenham were also the most anxious people in the capital. As their boroughs feature in the bottom 5 in all 4 categories perhaps that’s not surprising.

ONS Well-being Survey
How anxious did you feel yesterday?
Least anxious Most anxious
Enfield Hackney
Barnet Barking and Dagenham
Harrow Lambeth
Newham Southwark
Hillingdon Islington

The least anxious were not in the affluent areas that scored well in other categories but in the North London boroughs of Enfield, Barnet and Harrow.

Source data

See also

Well-being and wealth – how South West London soars ahead of the rest

Are you a north of the river or south of the river Londoner?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Muhammad and Amelia top London’s baby name charts, again

1 in every 100 boys born in London last year was named Muhammad. It has been the most popular boys’ name in the capital since 2011 and bucks the trend of the rest England and Wales where Oliver topped the naming charts in every other region except the North East, where it was 2nd.

The other spelling of the name, Mohammed, was the 10th most popular choice in London. Taken together it was the name for 1,300 of the 65,523 boys born in the capital, or 1.98%, according to data from the Office of National Statistics.

Amelia was the most popular girls’ name, as it was across England and Wales, and was given to 1% of the 61,869 girls born in London. Amelia has been the nationwide favourite since 2012.

Top Names in London 2014
Boys Girls
Muhammad Amelia
Oliver Olivia
Alexander Sophia
Daniel Isabella
Joshua Emily
James Maya
Adam Sofia
George Mia
Jack Sophie
Mohammed Chloe

Parents of girls seemed particularly fond of names ending with ia. They accounted for 5 of the top 10 names. Variants of Sophia/Sofia/Sophie also dominated accounting for more than 1,200 of the girls or just over 2%.

Source data

See also

Fewer babies born last year but birth rates vary across city

Schools data reveals ethnic mix with fall in proportion of white British pupils

Our multi-lingual city – English second language for half of primary pupils