A third of 10 and 11-year-olds obese in two areas of London

shutterstock_291654485-2London’s record on childhood obesity has been poor and getting worst for some time. But data for small areas released by Public Health England raise new levels of concern as in two neigbbourhoods a third of the 10 and 11-year old children are now obese.

In the electoral ward of Camberwell Green, Southwark 34% of Year 6 children are obese. In Hoxton West in Hackney its 33%.  Only one other area of England has a higher level – 35% in Sutton-on-Sea in Lincolnshire.

The Public Health England data covers nearly 7,500 electoral wards in England and it shows that six of the ten worst areas for childhood obesity among Year 6 children are in London.

Obesity Year 6 wards-2

It’s a similar pattern for children in Reception, aged 4 and 5, where Woodberry Down ward in Hackney has the worst record in the country and a rate that is double the England average. Six other neighbourhoods in the capital are also among the worst ten in England for this age group.

Obesity reception ward-2

This small area data is gathered by Public Health England to help target resources to combat child weight problems.

The poor record on obesity for primary school children is reflected more broadly at borough level and underlines that London has one of the most severe problems in the country.

At Reception age,  six of the ten local authorities with the highest rates are in London.  The highest level local authority average rate in the England is nearly 14% in Barking and Dagenham. Greenwich, Newham, Hackney, Southwark and Tower Hamlets all have rates of 12% or above.

The obesity rates in these boroughs doubles for Year 6 children. Enfield and Westminster also have more than a quarter of Year 6 children classified as obese.  Eight of the ten local authorities in England with the highest obesity rates for 10 and 11-year olds are in London.

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See also

How the obesity rate doubled for the class of 2007

Childhood obesity highest in London

Thousands of children sent to hospital because of tooth decay

 

How well qualified are people in your borough?

exam roomParts of East London are seeing a massive rise in the proportion of people with degree-level qualifications.

Since 2004 the proportion of working-age people who are graduates or have a similar level of qualification has nearly trebled in Newham.  In Barking and Dagenham, Havering and Bexley it has gone up by more than 130%.

Despite the recent increases these boroughs still have some of the lowest levels of people educated to what is called NVQ4+ level. This includes bachelor and post-graduate degrees, HNC, HND, BTEC higher level and some professional qualifications, such as nursing and accountancy.

Qualification map

Havering has the lowest level in the capital with 28% while in inner London boroughs at least half the working-age population has reached this level of education.

In the City of London 88% of people are graduates or the equivalent. In the wealthy south west areas of Wandsworth and Richmond it is more than 70%.

London has a better qualified workforce than any other region of the UK.  In London, 52% of people have been educated to NVQ4+ level compared to 38% for England as a whole.  Just 7% of Londoners have no academic or professional qualifications.

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See Also

The city’s workforce: best qualified in the UK and getting smarter

Far more 16-year-olds staying in school in London than across the UK

 

Landlords putting the brakes on rent rises

Modern flats

The rise in London rental prices is slowing down.

In a bit of good news for tenants and bad news for private landlords, figures from the Office for National Statistics show that rents in London are now rising slower than the average for the rest of England.

In the 12 month to the March this year rents in the capital had gone up by 1.6% compared to 2.4% across the rest of England, according to data from the ONS Index of Private Housing Rental Prices. This is in line with a trend in the year-on-year figures since November last year when London slipped behind average rise for the rest of country.

Before August 2015,  London rental prices were rising much faster than elsewhere.

rent rise march 2017

A regional breakdown of the data shows that the 1.6% rate of increase in London is the same as Yorkshire and Humberside. Rents in five other regions of the England are now climbing faster than the capital.  This includes the East and West Midlands, East of England, the South West and the South East. The increase in the South East over the period was 3.4%.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) says that the demand for rental property across the country remains steady but the number of new landlords instructing letting agents is down for the sixth month in a row.  This may increase pressure on prices, but RICS says that London is the exception to this. In its most recent monthly survey of the residential property market  it says that rents will continue to ‘soften’ in coming months and then remain broadly static for the year ahead.

While that may be a welcome forecast for more than a quarter of Londoners who rent their homes from private landlords, the amount they pay each month is still more than double the average for the rest of the UK.

Source data

See also

What you need to know about renting in London

Families face the biggest premiums for renting homes in the capital

More “affordable” homes but the rents prove unaffordable for many

Is Kensington really safer than Battersea? The answer may surprise you

Kensington Chelsea

A multi-million pound divorce case in the High Court had to consider an interesting London question this week, the relative safety of some neighbourhoods.

A woman fighting her ex husband for a settlement that includes a £5 million house in Kensington told the court that she felt ‘frightened’ when she left the area. She had rejected alternative homes suggested by her ex valued at around £2.5 million in the ‘less opulent’ areas of Shepherd’s Bush and Battersea.

But was her faith in the security of the Royal Borough misplaced?  As the couple remain anonymous it’s not possible to look at the exact locations of all the homes involved but the crime rates for the different boroughs may offer some surprises.

Affluent and exclusive Kensington and Chelsea has a crime rate of 121 offences per 1,000 residents, according to data from the GLA.  It’s the fourth highest rate in London and well above the city average of 84.

Shepherd’s Bush is in the borough of Hammersmith and Fulham.  It neighbours Kensington and Chelsea and has a slightly lower crime rate of 113 offences per 1,000 residents.

The more secure option may have been the Battersea home.  Battersea is in the borough of Wandsworth where crime is well below average at 72 per 1,000 people.

The judge, Mrs Justice Roberts, ruled that the alternatives put forward by the ex-husband were in ‘respectable and established family residential areas’.

She said: “Even allowing for the fact that she clearly has an anxious personality, I am not persuaded that any of these areas can be characterised as unsafe or inappropriate, devoid of the kind of amenities usually associated with areas occupied by professional families and others.”

The judge decided that the woman needed a housing fund of £2.5 million not the £5 million she was asking for.

If safety is her utmost concern then she might consider boroughs where the crime rate is less than half that of Kensington and Chelsea. Harrow has the lowest crime rate in London – just 50 crimes per 1,000 residents.  In Bexley the rate is 52 and in Sutton it is just 56.  None, of course, are as fashionable.

Crime rate

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London Borough Profiles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Borough Profile: Westminster

People

Westminster has a population of 239,862, that’s 2.8% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 37.6 years old, that’s 1.7 years older than the London average. There are more children in the borough than pensioners. Children and young people under 16 make up 15% of the population compared to 12% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 39% of the residents. 51% of the people living in Westminster were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from United States and makes up 4% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from France. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Italy and France.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £875,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 17% owning their home outright and a further 12% with a mortgage compared to 43% who rent privately and a further 28% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £674.

Crime

The crime rate in Westminster is 212 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is the highest in London by some way.  The London average is 84 per 1,000 residents.  Westminster, which covers the shopping and socialising area of the West End, has large number of visitors.

The Area

Westminster covers an area of 2,149 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 38% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Westminster is below the national average with 66% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £46,820 and for women it is lower at £37,715.  The median income for a household in the borough is £80,760.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 64% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 5% have no qualifications and 2% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 48,810 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.5 cars per household.  Westminster is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 18.4% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Westminster can expect to live until they are 82, for women life expectancy is 86 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 161.5 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 4% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 25% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.3 out of 10, which is below average for London.

See other borough profiles

Source Data

Borough Profile: Wandsworth 

People

Wandsworth has a population of 318,253, that’s 3.7% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 34.9 years old, that’s 1 year younger than the London average. There are more children in the borough than pensioners. Children and young people under 16 make up 17% of the population compared to 9% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 30% of the residents. 33% of the people living in Wandsworth were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Poland and makes up 2% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from South Africa. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Italy and Spain.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £532,500.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 18% owning their home outright and a further 31% with a mortgage compared to 31% who rent privately and a further 19% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £683.

Crime

The crime rate in Wandsworth is 73 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84 .

The Area

Wandsworth covers an area of 3,426 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 27% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Wandsworth is above the national average with 79% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £42,098 and for women it is lower at £37,146.  The median income for a household in the borough is £66,220.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 66% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 4% have no qualifications and 3% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 89,513 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.7 cars per household.  Wandsworth is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 18.2% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Wandsworth can expect to live until they are 80, for women life expectancy is 84 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 176.6 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 4% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 21% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.4 out of 10, which is above average for London.

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Borough Profile: Waltham Forest 

People

There are 274,139 people living in Waltham Forest, that’s 3.2% of the 8.6 million Londoners.

The average age of the population is 34.9 years old, that’s 1 year younger than the London average. There are more children in the borough than pensioners. Children and young people under 16 make up 22% of the population compared to 10% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 50% of the residents. 36% of the people living in Waltham Forest were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Pakistan and makes up 5% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Poland. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Romania and Bulgaria.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £320,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 21% owning their home outright and a further 29% with a mortgage compared to 30% who rent privately and a further 20% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,447.

Crime

The crime rate in Waltham Forest is 78 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84 .

The Area

Waltham Forest covers an area of 3,881 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 31% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Waltham Forest is below the national average with 73% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £32,574 and for women it is lower at £25,661.  The median income for a household in the borough is £39,460.

The workforce is among the less qualified in London with 43% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 12% have no qualifications and 3% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 76,217 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.8 cars per household.  Waltham Forest is rated as below average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 12.8% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Waltham Forest can expect to live until they are 79, for women life expectancy is 84 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 185.3 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 6% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 22% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.2 out of 10, which is below average for London.

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Borough Profile: Tower Hamlets

 

People

Tower Hamlets has a population of 297,805, that’s 3.5% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 31.3 years old, that’s 4.6 years younger than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 20% of the population compared to 6% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 54% of the residents. 38% of the people living in Tower Hamlets were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Bangladesh and makes up 15% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from India. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Italy and Spain.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £383,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 7% owning their home outright and a further 20% with a mortgage compared to 32% who rent privately and a further 42% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,181.

Crime

The crime rate in Tower Hamlets is 100 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is higher than the London average of 84 and is among the highest in the capital.

The Area

Tower Hamlets covers an area of 1,978 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 15% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Tower Hamlets is below the national average with 70% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £36,638 and for women it is lower at £32,423.  The median income for a household in the borough is £45,720.

The workforce is among the less qualified in London with 46% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 10% have no qualifications and 3% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 43,589 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.4 cars per household.  Tower Hamlets is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 19.3% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Tower Hamlets can expect to live until they are 78, for women life expectancy is 83 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 238.7 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 7% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 27% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.2 out of 10, which is below average for London.

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Borough Profile: Sutton 

People

There are 201,751 people living in Sutton, that’s 2.3% of the 8.6 million Londoners.

The average age of the population is 38.7 years old, that’s 2.8 years older than the London average. The under 16s in the borough outnumber the over 65s. Children and young people under 16 make up 21% of the population compared to 15% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 25% of the residents. 26% of the people living in Sutton were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Sri Lanka and makes up 2% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from India. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Romania and Bulgaria.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £285,000.   Owner occupiers outnumber those who rent with 26% owning their home outright and a further 42% with a mortgage compared to 21% who rent privately and a further 12% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,459.

Crime

The crime rate in Sutton is 56 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is lower than the London average of 84 and is among the lowest in the capital.

The Area

Sutton covers an area of 4,385 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 32% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Sutton is above the national average with 78% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £36,251 and for women it is lower at £26,372.  The median income for a household in the borough is £49,170.

The workforce is among the less qualified in London with 43% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 4% have no qualifications and 3% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 91,266 cars in the borough, which equates to 1.2 cars per household.  Sutton is rated as below average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 12.5% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Sutton can expect to live until they are 81, for women life expectancy is 83 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 163.2 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 6% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 17% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.5 out of 10, which is above average for London.

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Source Data

 

Borough Profile: Southwark

People

Southwark has a population of 310,642, that’s 3.6% of the 8.6 million people living in London

The average age of the population is 34.2 years old, that’s 1.7 years younger than the London average. There are more children in the borough than pensioners. Children and young people under 16 make up 18% of the population compared to 8% for the over 65s.

People who are black, Asian or of minority ethnic origin, BAME, represent 46% of the residents. 36% of the people living in Southwark were born abroad. The largest migrant group according to the last census is from Nigeria and makes up 5% of the population. The second largest group, based on the census is from Jamaica. More recently the largest number of migrants have come from Spain and Italy.

Housing

The median house price in the borough is £420,000.   Those who rent outnumber owner occupiers with 10% owning their home outright and a further 26% with a mortgage compared to 26% who rent privately and a further 37% living in social housing rented from the council or a housing association.

The council tax on a Band D property (the mid-tier cost in most local authorities) is £1,207.

Crime

The crime rate in Southwark is 101 crimes per 1,000 residents, which is higher than the London average of 84 and is among the highest in the capital.

The Area

Southwark covers an area of 2,886 hectares compared to the biggest borough, Bromley, which covers more than 15,000. The smallest borough, not counting the City of London, is Kensington and Chelsea, which covers around 1,200 hectares.

Some 25% of the area is classified as green space. The average for London is 38%.

Work

The employment rate in the Southwark is above the national average with 74% of people in work. The median annual salary for men is £36,004 and for women it is lower at £32,058.  The median income for a household in the borough is £48,000.

The workforce is among the highest qualified in London with 57% of workers who are educated to degree level or above. 8% have no qualifications and 2% of young people under 25 are listed as NEETS (that’s not in education, employment or training).

Transport

There are 60,438 cars in the borough, which equates to 0.5 cars per household.  Southwark is rated as above average for public transport, based on an index compiled by Transport for London. According to Government data on physical activity, 15.6% of people cycle each month.

Health and Well-being

Men living in Southwark can expect to live until they are 79, for women life expectancy is 84 years. The borough has a death rate from what are considered to be preventable causes of 207.5 per 100,000 people. The national rate for England is 182.

Other health indicators show that 6% of people over 17 suffer from diabetes and 28% of children are classified as obese.

When asked in a Government survey to rate their satisfaction with life the average score of people in the borough was 7.5 out of 10, which is above average for London.

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