Economic growth carries risk for culture and creativity, says report

AstroStar shutterstock_251095102-2

Photo: AstroStar ┃Shutterstock.com

The economic success of London may be coming at a cost to the culture and creativity of the city. This is the warning in a report by the World Cities Culture Forum, a network of 27 cities, including London, that share research to help develop policy.

In its 2015 report, published to coincide with a summit meeting in London, it says that the capital’s growth poses significant challenges with pressure on housing and transport, and many people priced out of the city centre.

As reported by Urbs, the affordability of housing means younger people, in particular, find trouble finding a place to live, with many moving back in with parents after finishing higher education.

The report observes that the rising cost of living makes it very difficult for those working in the creative industries to find not only a home but also a space to work. It says, “For some years, places like London and New York have been replacing studios with apartments, artists with bankers. Estimates suggest that in the next four years, London will lose around 30% of its current artists’ workspace.”

The forum says that the emergence of ‘tech city’ in East London in the 1990s demonstrated the value of low cost workspace. Without it cities are prevented form nurturing radical and provocative ideas.

According to data analysis by the WCCF, London has the highest proportion of people working in the creative industries of any of its 27 city members. It says that 16.2% of the London workforce is in the creative industries, according to data from the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

creative industries employment

Ricky Burdett, Professor of Urban Studies at the LSE says, “The contribution of London’s creative industries to national productivity 
and its ability to attract young and global workforce are central to its survival as a world city.”


Surveys have shown that people globally rate London highly as a city to come to work, as previously reported by Urbs. The cultural and creative life of the city plays a part in their decision.

The report says that while some cities are now making low cost work space a priority they are failing to solve the problem of affordable housing for their artists, producers and young creative talent.

London data

World Cities Culture Forum 2015 report

See also

Where in the world would you like to work?

London leads Europe but lags behind US as tech start up base, says survey

 

 

Heathrow decision soon but survey says most unconcerned by aircraft noise

© Olilee2 | Dreamstime.com - Heathrow Congestion Photo

Picture: © Olilee2 | Dreamstime.com

Aircraft noise has no impact on the majority of Londoners who took part in a survey conducted by the GLA, but most of those taking part were aware of the proposal to expand Heathrow, currently awaiting government approval.

The GLA used its regular phone poll of 1,000 people to ask to what extent daily life is affected by aircraft noise. A third said not at all and a further 28% said that they hardly noticed it.

7% of those asked said it had an adverse impact, with 3% saying it caused very significant impact, sometimes disrupting their sleep. If that 7% is converted into a proportion of the current population that’s around 600,000 people

Aircraft noise survey

But the low rate of concern about noise from the majority will be unwelcome to those campaigning against the expansion of Heathrow. The Airport Commission, set up to determine the expansion of airport provision for London and the South East recommended in July that Heathrow should grow.

The Mayor, Boris Johnson, is opposed to the plan and the Conservative chosen to try to replace him, Zac Goldsmith, has been a leading critic. Mr Goldsmith, who is the MP for Richmond Park, an area on the flight path, published a map which he said showed how noise from an expanded Heathrow could affect around 1 million Londoners. The results of this survey suggest that concern may currently be falling on deaf ears.

In delivering its verdict the Airport Commission acknowledged the noise pollution problems of a bigger Heathrow where a plane currently takes off or lands every 45 seconds. While is said that expansion of Heathrow was the clear choice because it delivered far larger economic benefits it hedged it bets by saying that Gatwick’s expansion plan was also “credible’.

The decision was given to the Government and is expected this autumn.

Source data

Heathrow gets the nod to expand, but it’s already Europe’s noisiest airport

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Neck and neck in the race to replace Boris

Cheaper in the Championship but many fans still paying some premier prices

Picure: © Photospook ┃Creative Commons

Picure: © Photospook ┃Creative Commons

For most London fans the cost of following football is considerably cheaper in the Championship or lower leagues than the top flight, but there are still some premier rate prices being charged for lower league football.

The average season ticket price for a Championship club in London is much lower than the Premier League, as you might expect. The average for the most expensive season ticket was £651 while the average price for the cheapest season ticket in the Premier League is £658.

But the averages hide some surprising facts. Data gathered by the BBC in its Price of Football Study shows that the most expensive season ticket at Crystal Palace and newly promoted Watford are below £700 but a top of the range season ticket at relegated QPR is £719 and at Fulham it is £839, the highest in the Championship.

The ticket pricing reflects clubs adjusting after promotion and relegation. Watford went up and their cheapest season ticket rose by £19 to £385. QPR fell out of the Premier League and their cheapest season ticket was reduced by more than £100 but is still £389. Adjustments are also made on match day tickets. Watford increased their cheapest match day ticket from £14 to £36. At QPR it is down £1 to £24.

Football season ticket championship

There’s a similar scenario at Millwall. The cheapest and most expensive season tickets at The Den are frozen at last season’s prices although the club is now playing League 1 football. The cheapest match day ticket has been reduced by £1.

Leyton Orient dropped the cheapest season ticket price by £40 on being relegated to League 2 but at £180 it is still a fiver more than Charlton’s cheapest and they’re playing in the Championship

Football season tickets L 1 2

 

Fans always have the option to buy single tickets rather than one for the season, but the price of a big day out at the game does not come cheap either. Urbs took the median ticket price and added a replica shirt, programme, a pie and a cup of tea to calculate the cost of a one off match day experience. Our calculations show that it is cheaper than the Premier League but there’s not a huge difference between the Championship and League 2.

Football match day championship

Football match day L1 2

The biggest cost is the replica shirt, particular if you want the orange and black hoops of Barnet, just up from the Conference this season, but with a Premier League price on the kit. One saving you do make at The Hive is the price of a pie.  Barnet don’t have any, and neither do AFC Wimbledon.

Following football is packed with highs and lows for fans, but one thing remains consistent, it is punishing on the pocket.

Source data

See also

Season ticket price freeze but what’s the cost of a day out for a less loyal fan?

Met earns millions for policing football but costs are higher still

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

Season ticket price freeze but what’s the cost of a day out for a less loyal fan?

Picture © joshjdss via Creative Commonsjpg-2

Picture © joshjdss via Creative Commons

The cost of going to football for most loyal London fans of Premier League clubs has been frozen or increased by modest amounts this season. This sounds like good news until you realise that London clubs have some of the highest season ticket prices in the top flight.

Arsenal remains the most expensive. The most costly season ticket at the Emirates is £2,013 and the cheapest over £1,000. Arsenal froze season ticket prices this season, as did Chelsea, and Tottenham Hotspur. West Ham pushed up their most expensive season ticket by £20 compared to last season, and the cheapest by £15. Crystal Palace added £5 to the most expensive but took £7 off the cheapest.

Football season tickets 15

Newly promoted Watford added £19 to the cheapest season-long seat at Vicarage Road. But their cheapest match day ticket last season of £14 has gone with promotion. The cheapest now is £36.

The data is revealed in the BBC’s annual Price of Football Study. This year it looked at the prices at 227 clubs in 13 leagues across the UK.

The average match day price for the cheapest ticket across London is now £32.50. That average number is helped up by Chelsea who charge £52 for the cheapest ticket to Stamford Bridge. That’s the most expensive cheap seat in the country.

The study shows that little has changed for season tickets holders, but for those who are less committed or just want to experience the top level of English football what would be the cost of a big day out? Urbs did some calculations.

We looked at the prices to give a fan the full experience. On ticketing we took the median price of the most popular match day tickets. We added a replica shirt so you could join the tribe, a programme so you could get the words of wisdom from the manager, plus a pie and a cuppa at half time.

Our number crunching shows that ever-expensive Arsenal comes out as the priciest day out. Watford offer the best value, as you might expect for a newly promoted side, and an afternoon at Selhurst Park shouting for Crystal Palace is at the lower end, apart from those pricey pies.

 

The Premier League likes to think that it is the best in the world. When you consider that it is still possible to buy a match day ticket at Bayern Munich for £12, at these prices it had better be.

Source data

See also

A poor day out in the Prem is away fans’ verdict on most London grounds

Met earns millions for policing football but costs are higher still

 

 

 

Neck and neck in the race to replace Boris

Labour’s Sadiq Khan and the Conservative’s Zac Goldsmith are running neck and neck in the race to be London Mayor, according to polling organisation You Gov.

A survey of a little over 1,000 Londoners gave Khan 29% of the support to Goldsmith’s 28%. But with 44% saying they were not sure who would make the best Mayor it is all to play for in the race to replace Boris. When the don’t knows are factored out it is 51/49 in Khan’s favour.

Looking at the detailed breakdown, Sadiq Khan gets a more favourable response from women. Zac Goldsmith has more support among older voters.

With a margin or error of 3 points it is hard to separate Khan and Goldsmith in a number of the survey responses. They score closely on who would be best in a crisis and votes appear to find them equally likeable.

It is only when it comes to who is most in touch with ordinary people that there is some clear air between the candidate. Here Khan, the MP for Tooting and the son of a bus driver scores much better than Goldsmith, the MP for Richmond Park and son of a multi-millionaire.

The current Mayor, the Conservative Boris Johnson, has retained his popularity according to the GLA’s own polling, as reported here. But whether this legacy will rub off on Zac Goldsmith, also a bit of an outsider on a number of issues in the Conservative camp, will be key in the city which remained a Labour stronghold during the election in May.

The poll by YouGov, on behalf of the Evening Standard, is the first to be carried out since both the  candidates for the larger parties were confirmed. There are 6 others in the field including the Lib Dem Caroline Pidgeon, the Greens’ Sian Berry, Peter Whittle for UKIP, and 3 others. The election is on 5th May next year.

Poll data

See also

As Boris enter his final months, how happy have we been with the Mayor?

Lib Dem’s London collapse a consolation prize for Labour

Photo Zac Goldsmith, courtesy Policy Exchange

Photo Sadiq Khan, courtesy National Archive

 

 

 

 

Universities climb world rankings, but here’s how they score against the best

Imperial College, London's highest ranking university

Imperial College, London’s highest ranking university

London has 7 universities in the top 200 in the world and 4 of them are in the top 30. The annual rankings by Times Higher Education showed an improved performance this year with Imperial College going up a place to 8th and UCL breaking into the top 20 at 14th.

The LSE climbed 9 places to 23 and the improvement was even greater for Kings College, rising from 40 to 27th. Queen Mary broke into the top 100 at 98 and St George’s held on at 196th. The only London institution in the top 200 to fall back was Royal Holloway down to 129 from 118 last year.

The rankings are drawn up using 13 performance indicators split into 5 areas: teaching, research, citations, international outlook and industry income. The detailed scoring in each category and some of the statistics about each university show where London institutions are doing well and where they are not able to compete with the best in the country, currently ranked by Times Higher Education as Oxford, and the best in the world, the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

In the category of teaching the judges examined data from a reputation survey and looked at the staff to student ratios at each institution.

While the score for teaching at Imperial is close to Oxford, and not that far behind at UCL, after that the gap opens up between the UK’s best and London’s other top 30 universities. Caltech has a clear lead.

University rankings teaching

UCL is London’s best perfomer in the research criteria, judged on reputation and income. None can compete with Oxford, not even Caltech.

University rankings research

There’s better news for Imperial when it comes to the influence of the research. It scores highly for citations for published work, as do all London’s top 4.

Perhaps it is not surprising that universities in London, a leading global city, should do well in the international outlook area. Imperial out-performs Oxford and UCL matches it. All 4 trounce Caltech in this category.

University rankings internat

But the area where London’s universities lag behind is in winning industry income. Involvement in innovation, invention and consulting projects is, according to the judges, becoming a core mission for academic institutions.

There’s a big gap here between the Oxford and London’s best but Caltech, home of the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is clear winner. For once, it seems, the answer really is rocket science.

Source data

See also

Universities marked down by their own students

London leads in places for poorer students

 

 

 

 

 

 

London may win for iPhone earning power over Poland but cost of living much higher

It takes 100 hours longer to earn enough money to buy an iPhone in Poland as it does in the UK.

This insight into earning power by researchers at the financial services company UBS helps to demonstrate why overseas workers find London an attractive city to find a job.

But their findings also show that while the earning potential may be better, London is an expensive city with prices much higher than they are in the place many Londoners once called home.

UBS took 68,000 pieces of data from 71 cities around world to put together an index which looks at costs and the spending power of people working there.

London is ranked as the 5th most expensive city after New York, Zurich, Geneva and Oslo and 6th most expensive if rents are excluded. When it comes to take home pay, the amount we earn after tax, London trails in 11th in the list.

And UBS came up with some interesting measures of spending power. Using a new iPhone as a benchmark they examined how long the average worker would take to earn the cash to buy one. In New York it takes 3 working days. In London it’s 41 hours, in Warsaw 141, but the longest labour was in Kiev.

Iphone earnings

Across the globe it is much quicker to eat a Big Mac than to earn the money to buy one. In London it takes 12 minutes and in Warsaw twice that. In Nairobi it’s nearly 3 hours.

Big Mac earnings

Many can happily avoid the indulgence of a new smartphone or a burger and the real cost of living is measured in essentials such as food and housing.

UBS looked at a shopping basket of 39 common food items including bread, milk, meat, fish and vegetables. Many arriving in London to work will have realised that it is much more expensive to feed the family, unless you have moved from New York or Zurich. The average global price for the basket of goods was $400. Prices were highest in Zurich and lowest in Kiev. London was 8th most expensive of the 71 cities

 

USB has published the Price and Earnings Index every three year since 1971.

See also

London expensive? Not compared to being an expat in Luanda

What National Insurance really tells us about London’s overseas workforce

 

 

Museums much searched on Google are found by millions from overseas, says survey

Science Museum

London’s Science Museum…much searched, often found

Measuring popularity by the number of Google searches has become a pretty regular metric. A quick glance at Google Trends top chart will tell you that Pharrell Williams is more popular than Benedict Cumberbatch, more of us want to make chocolate cake than carrot cake, and the thing we most want to know how to do is to draw.

The latest top 5 in the Google league tells us that museums and galleries in London are the most searched in the world. According to London & Partners, the Mayor’s official promotional company, the Google museum search list has London institutions at 1,2, and 3.

  1. Science Museum, London
  2. Natural History Museum, London
  3. British Museum, London
  4. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  5. Smithsonian Museum, Washington DC

London and Partners caution that Google’s methodology means that the results may vary day to day and the Science Museum comes top “on average”.

Perhaps more telling therefore is not how many people search the museum name on Google but how many people come to visit.

According to London and Partners a visitor survey conducted through 15,000 face to face interviews at 13 museums and galleries by research company Morris Hargreaves McIntyre concluded that they received 17.9 million overseas visitors in 2014 and 2015 out of a total visitor number of 31.5 million. That’s 57% of visitors, and an increase of 19% over the past 4 years.

French and American tourists were the most frequent, in line with figures for London visitor numbers, as reported by Urbs. Along with people from Italy, Spain and Germany they accounted for 9.7 million of the 17.9 million overseas museum visitors, according to the survey.

Source data

See also

Good news for tourists and Londoners as city dominates for visitor attractions

French biggest group of visitors but Americans spend most

London ranked as top global city destination

Where the arts-loving Londoners live – not in Newham

 

 

 

 

 

 

Global success means London is more at risk from climate change, says report

Canary Wharf buidlingThe economy of London is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and businesses are doing too little to make themselves more resilient, according to a report by a committee of the London Assembly.

London’s vulnerability is not confined to local weather events like flooding or drought, and is due largely to its success as a global financial centre. This inter-dependence with other economies means risk for the financial services sector, and international supply chains could be easily disrupted leading to shortages of products or components.

In its report, Weathering the Storm, the Economy Committee of the London Assembly finds that more than half of the FTSE 100 companies have not built climate change adaptation into their business strategy or continuity planning.

And small and medium size businesses are generally less well prepared with 60% lacking any plan to deal with the impact of extreme weather conditions.


See also

Emission targets at risk as growing population hits greener city plan

Nearly 9,500 deaths a year – study reveals impact of air pollution


The reports says that one problems is a lack of skills in the workforce to help firms develop adaptive strategies and policies to deal with the risk of climate change.

It points to an opportunity for London. It says that the risk from climate change is a global one. There is a growing demand for good, services and infrastructure that can adapt and businesses in the capital may be well placed to provide them.

The committee urges the Mayor, Boris Johnson, to take more action to prepare the city and it companies for extreme weather, both here and globally.

42 pedestrians and cyclists injured each week by hit and run drivers

bikesMore than 1,200 pedestrians and over 1,000 cyclists were injured by hit and run drivers in London last year. The figures include 6 deaths – 4 people on foot and 2 on bikes.

This means that a fifth of all injuries to pedestrians and cyclists in 2014 were caused by drivers who didn’t stop. This equates to 6 people a day, or 42 each week and is an increase of 16% in pedestrian injured in hit and run incidents and a 13% rise for cyclists, compared to 2013.

Overall the number of hit and run collisions, including cars, fell marginally last year from 4,154 to 4,049. The figures were revealed in a written answer from the Mayor, Boris Johnson, to Green Party London Assembly Member Jenny Jones.

Hit and run injuries 2014
Fatal Serious Slight Total
Pedestrian 4 132 1,076 1,212
Cyclist 2 91 921 1,014
Car 0 24 1,799 1,823

As the figures show, pedestrians and cyclists are far more vulnerable to death and serious injury.

Jenny Jones said: “There are far too many arrogant drivers who think they can get away with injuring someone, just as they think they can get away with breaking the rules on speeding, jumping red lights and using mobile phones.”

As previously reported by Urbs, fewer people were killed or seriously injured overall on the capital’s road last year. But injuries to cyclists were up. The GLA benchmarks road safety figures against the average for the years 2005-09. On this measure deaths and serious injuries to cyclists were up by 3% and minor injuries by 73% last year. TfL points out that since 2005 there has been a 92% increase in the number of journeys taken by bike.

See also

Road deaths and serious injuries down but pedestrians remain most at risk

Pedestrians and cyclists push Westminster to top of road injuries list

Nearly 9,500 deaths a year – study reveals impact of air pollution